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VOL XVII NO. 45 NOVEMBER 5. 1987 


1528 15TH STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94103 


TELEPHONE: 415/861-5019 


Lawsuit Charges Collusion 
Between Feds, AZT Maker 

Company Donates $55,000 for Research; 
Special Status Granted for Marketing Drug 


by Ray O'Loughlin 

The two federal agencies which approve and regulate AIDS treatments are accused of col¬ 
luding with drug manufacturers. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Food and Drug 
Administration (FDA) are accused of expediting the approval of AZT in exchange for a $55,000 
donation by the AZT manufacturer, Burroughs Wellcome. In July 1985, Burroughs received 
exclusive rights to market AZT for seven years. 


The allegation is part of a class 
action lawsuit filed in June by 
San Francisco-based Gay Rights 
Advocates. The suit accuses the 
NIH of failing to spend $47 
million appropriated by Con¬ 
gress for experimental drug 
treatments. In response to the 
government’s motion to dismiss 
the suit, NGRA released a series 


of letters indicating that certain 
medications are put on a “fast 
track for approval.” They charge 
that there are unethical conflicts 
of interest in the agencies’ opera¬ 
tions. 

“If the judge allows this case 
to go forward, we will prove that 
government officials have been 


engaged in unethical and illegal 
conduct resulting in serious 
delays of promising new AIDS 
medications,” said NGRA’s legal 
director, Leonard Graff. 

According to documents filed 
in U.S. District Court in Wash¬ 
ington, D.C., Dr. Samuel Broder 
of the National Cancer Institute, 
part of NIH, encouraged Bur¬ 
roughs Wellcome to fund three 
research positions in his 
laboratory. 

Shortly after that Burroughs 
applied to the FDA for “orphan 
drug” status for AZT. Two weeks 
later Broder’s office received the 
check for $55,000 from Bur¬ 
roughs. That same day FDA 
granted the company exclusive 
rights to market AZT. Originally 
developed as a cancer treatment, 
AZT has been in existence for 
over 20 years. 

“We’re alleging a special 
cooperative relationship between 
sister agencies that put certain 
drugs on a fast track for ap¬ 
proval,” said Graff. Both NIH 
and FDA come under the federal 
(Continued on page 19) 


Rights Chief Canned 
For 'Missouri' Stand 

Mayor Launches a Vendetta 
Against Homeporting Opponents 

by Tim Taylor 

Mayor Diaime Feinstein dumped Human Rights Commis¬ 
sion Chairwoman Esta Soler last week as the city’s chief 
guardian against discrimination. Soler earlier this year led 
the commission in passing a strongly worded resolution 
which opposed homeporting the USS Missouri until the Navy 
reversed its policy to discriminate against lesbians and 
gay men. (Continued on page 20} 



(Photo: R. Pruzan) 


HALLOWEEN: Wasn't it special!! For pictures of the night of 
the ghouls, see page 2 and pages 32-36. 

TOO GAY: Pres. Reagan hastily changed his mind on nomi¬ 
nating a Sacramento federal judge when someone pointed 
out what could possibly be a pro-gay statement in one of his 
rulings. See page 3. 

FOOD FOR THE SOUL: Mary Richards cooks up a recipe for 
curing the health crisis blues by throwing a dinner party, not 
a tantrum. See page 16. 


It's Agnos vs. Molinari in Runoff 



Molinari Vows Renewed Campaign; Gay Vote Leans Toward Agnos 


by Tim Taylor 


those who would bring it to dark¬ 
ness and doom. I will not give it 
over to those who have a radical 
and dark vision of the future.” 

He said an Agnos victory 
would resurrect the chaos of the 
“tumultuous sixties.” 

The Molinari victory party 
resembled more of a wake—until 
the candidate appeared at 11:20 
p.m. to revive the crowd—and his 
campaign. 

“Beginning here tonight we’re 
starting this campaign over,” 
Molinari said. “Tomorrow morn¬ 
ing at 7 o’clock Louise and I will 
be out at a bus stop to share our 
vision and our plan for the future 
of San Francisco. We’re going to 
get our message across to the 
voters.” 

Clearly some major change in 
(Continued on Pape 14) 


In the 35-day run off cam¬ 
paign, Agnos and Molinari will 
have to sharpen their messages in 
a struggle that already shows 
signs of bitterness. 

Agnos told his jubilant sup¬ 
porters that his huge lead was a 
result of a campaign that set 
positive themes and avoided the 
use of targeted mail that he call¬ 
ed “divisive.” He promised to 
stick to the “high road” prior to 
the December balloting. 

STARTING OVER 

Molinari took a more defiant 
stance in addressing his sup¬ 
porters. He acknowledged the 
outcome was not everything he 
had hoped for. Pointedly noting 
that he is a native San Francis¬ 
can, Molinari said, “I am not 
prepared to turn this city over to 


Art Agnos’ come-from-behind 
campaign for mayor staged a 
stunning upset as he finished 
first in the heated race for control 
of City Hall. He bested second- 
place finisher John Molinari by 
close to 2-to-l, and also appeared 
to sweep the lesbian and gay vote. 
Agnos and Molinari are now 
headed for a final showdown in a 
Dec. 8 run off election. 

With 100 percent of precincts 
reporting in the poor turn-out 
election, the tallies showed Agnos 
with 88,275 votes, or 48.2 per¬ 
cent; Molinari with 45,566 votes, 
or 34.9 percent; and Roger Boas 
with 39,769 votes, or 21.7 per¬ 
cent. 

Warren Hinckle ran ahead in 
a field of seven minor candidates, 
scoring 5,095 votes, or 2.8 per¬ 
cent of the ballots cast. 


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Supreme Court Candidate 
Vetoed Over Gay Footnote 

Jesse Helms Strikes Again as Reagan 
Backs Down in Nominating Sacramento Judge 

by Ray O'Loughlin 

A footnote reference to a pro-gay legal opinion appears to have killed the Supreme Court hopes 
for Sacramento Federal Judge Anthony M. Kennedy. According to a report Nov. 2 in the 
Recorder, San Francisco’s legal newspaper, a last-minute lobbying effort spearheaded by Sen. 
Jesse Helms (R-NC) convinced Pres. Reagan to drop his plans to nominate Kennedy. Instead 
Judge Douglas Ginsburg was named because he was seen as more suitable to conservatives in 
the Justice Department and Senate on gay and abortion rights issues. 


In a 1980 ruling upholding the 
U.S. Navy’s right to discharge a 
gay sailor, Kennedy allowed that 
there was some debate as to the 
constitutional issues presented in 
the case. He cited legal scholar 
Laurence Tribe as argument that 
gay sex acts may be protected by 
the constitutional right of 
privacy. Kennedy sits on the 
federal 9th Circuit Court of Ap¬ 
peals. 

Leonard Graff, of National Gay 
Rights Advocates, called the 
move against Kennedy an 
“outrage.” 


nedy stood an easier chance of 
being confirmed. 

HELMS MIFFED 

Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) 
campaigned for Ginsburg’s 
nomination, saying that Ken¬ 
nedy’s approach to privacy rights 
“signaled an overly moderate 
cast of mind,” according to The 
Recorder. 

Sen. Jesse Helms is credited 
with issuing the final blow to 
Kennedy’s nomination. Helms, 


reported the legal daily, “went 
all-out to stop Kennedy” once he 
saw the judge’s opinion that civil 
rights could possibly apply to 
gays. 

Helms reportedly placed a call 
to Reagan only hours before the 
President was to nominate Ken¬ 
nedy. Helms was miffed not only 
about Kennedy possibly being 
too moderate but also about not 
being included in White Hosue 
conferences to select a nominee 
after the defeat of Bork. 


“The Reagan Administration 
has now said that judicial gay 
bashing is the new litmus test for 
your qualifications to sit on the 
Supreme Court,” said Graff. 

Roberta Achtenberg, head of 
the Lesbian Rights Project, said 
that it’s clear that the litmus test 
for court nominees goes beyond 
abortion rights as once thought. 
“Kennedy is anti-abortion, is not 
middle of the road, and is a 
staunch conservative. It’s very 
shocking that that’s not 
enough,” she said. 

“No one had any idea that 
(gay) issues figured so prominent¬ 
ly,” said Achtenberg, in the selec¬ 
tion of judges. 

VICIOUS ENOUGH? 

In Beller v. Middendorf, Ken¬ 
nedy upheld as reasonable the 
military’s policy of banning all 
gays and lesbians. But he did not, 
as Judge Robert Bork did in 
Dronenberg v. Zech in 1984, ex¬ 
tend his opinion to repudiate any 
right to privacy for gay people. 
Kennedy recognized that “some 
kinds of government regulation 
of private consensual homosex¬ 
ual behavior may face substantial 
constitutional challenge.” 

“He came to the right (conser¬ 
vative) conclusion,” said Graff, 
“but he was not vicious enough.” 
Graff characterized Kennedy’s 
opinion as intelligent and well- 
thought out in contrast to Bork’s 
ideological approach. 

It was the circulation of Ken¬ 
nedy’s opinion in Beller and 
Bork’s opinion in Dronenberg 
that began the right-wing lobby¬ 
ing against Kennedy. According 
to The Recorder, a number of 
conservative senators threatened 
to filibuster Kennedy’s nomina¬ 
tion if Reagan went through with 
it. 

Attorney General Edwin 
Meese III led the fight against 
Kennedy. Meese favored Gins¬ 
burg as a more reliable conserva¬ 
tive vote on the High Court. 

One unnamed White House 
official was quoted by The 
Recorder saying, “Meese told the 
President that sometimes Ken¬ 
nedy’s reasoning doesn’t reflect 
our thinking.” 

White House staffers such as 
Chief of Staff Howard Baker, on 
the other hand, argued that Ken¬ 


Commenting on Tribe’s argu¬ 
ment, Kennedy wrote, “We re¬ 
cognize, as we must, that there is 
substantial academic comment 
which argues that the choice to 
engage in homosexual action is 
a personal decision entitled, at 
least in some instances, to 
recognition as a fundamental 
right and to full protection as an 
aspect of the individual’s right to 
privacy.’ ’ 

Despite that, Graff said, “Ken¬ 
nedy is not a friend of the gay 
community.” He referred to his 
conservatism and to his refusal to 
examine the military policy that 
excludes gays. “He merely defer¬ 
red to the military’s reasons for 
having that policy,” said Graff, 
“and they were the same reasons 
used to exclude blacks years 
ago.” 

Despite the Reagan Adminis¬ 
tration’s efforts to turn the courts 
against gay causes, Graff remain¬ 
ed optimistic in the long run. 
“The legal arm of the gay com¬ 
munity is one of many sound in¬ 
stitutions,” said Graff. “We have 
to look at it as a long-term 
endeavor. It was 50 years before 
the NAACP won its first case in 
the Supreme Court.” 

“There are many battles to be 
fought,” said Graff. “Eventually, 
we will prevail.” • 


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Conservatives apparently were 
concerned not only with a poten¬ 
tial pro-gay vote on the Supreme 
Court but also with a possible 
pro-rights view on abortion. They 
feared that Kennedy’s regard for 
privacy rights could lead him to 
oppose an expected challenge to 
Roe V. Wade, the 1973 case which 
made abortions legal in the U.S. 
That ruling was based on the con¬ 
stitutional right to privacy. 

Graff called the entire contro¬ 
versy over Kennedy’s supposed¬ 
ly pro-gay sympathies “oblique.” 
“It was only a footnote citing of 
Tribe’s remark and was only say¬ 
ing that people differ on the 
issue,” he said. 


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PWA Group Gathering 
Washington 
Subway Cards 

The Florida PWA Coalition is 
gathering Washington, D.C. sub¬ 
way fare cards left over from the 
March on Washington. The 
group plans to convert some of 
the Metro cards to cash and to 
provide the others to PWAs 
visiting Washington or the Na¬ 
tional Institutes of Health. 


BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 4 


“This is a painless way for peo¬ 
ple to help PWAs help them¬ 
selves,” said coalition coor¬ 
dinator Jim Merriam. ‘‘If 
enough people send us cards with 
fare still left on them, the Coali¬ 
tion will be able to expand its 
efforts to provide educational 
materials to PWAs,” Merriam 
said. 

People interested in donating 
their cards to the Coalition 
should mail their cards to Florida 
PWA Coalition, 13967 NE 2nd 
Ave., N. Miami, Florida 33161- • 


Here We Go Again 

LaRouche Initiative Makes the '88 Ballot 

by Jay Newquist 

The Lyndon LaRouchites behind Proposition 64 in 1986 last week filed more than 700,000 
signatures to qualify an identical initiative for the 1988 ballot. The initiative urges quarantine 
for carriers of the AIDS virus. The signatures gathered by Lyndon LaRouche supporters Brian 
Lantz and Khushro Ghandi must still be verified by California’s Secretary of State. But local 
gay and lesbian leaders say they fear the initiative will reach the ballot next June. 


Ralph Payne, who helped or¬ 
ganize the “No on 64” Cam¬ 
paign in 1986, said opponents 
will pursue legal challenges to 
keep the initiative off the ballot. 


At a strategy meeting in Los 
Angeles a week ago, Payne said 
there was a consensus that an ef¬ 
fort must be undertaken now to 
stop the initiative. 


“We must mount a campaign 
and go on the offensive on many 
levels instead of being on the 
defensive and reacting all the 
time,” Payne said. 


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“We must seize the initiative 
and appeal to the voters to take 
a positive approach to AIDS,” 
Payne said. 

Another top-level strategy ses¬ 
sion against the new LaRouche 
Initiative is planned for 
December. 

The new initiative calls for car¬ 
riers of the AIDS virus to be plac¬ 
ed on a list of reportable diseases. 
The initiative provides that each 
carrier “is subject to quarantine 
and isolation statutes and regula¬ 
tions.” 


MORE TROUBLE 

Payne said the new LaRouche 
Initiative would likely be eclips¬ 
ed by the Doolittle-Gann Initia¬ 
tive, which could reach the ballot 
in November, 1988. 

The Doolittle-Gann Initiative 
calls for mandatory reporting by 
doctors of people who test posi¬ 
tive to the AIDS antibody. It is 
being proposed by anti-gay state 
Sen. John Doolittle (R-Folsom) 
and anti-tax crusader Paul Gann, 
who was recently diagnosed with 
AIDS after having been exposed 
through a blood transfusion. 

“It rules out quarantine,” 
Payne said, “but it’s more dan¬ 
gerous than the LaRouche initia¬ 
tive because it’s more likely to 
pass.” 

Payne called for gay men and 
lesbians to show their solidarity 
against these AIDS initiatives by 
participating in a March on 
Sacramento next Memorial Day 
weekend. 

“This time we have to set up a 
state-wide coalition that will stay 
in place,” Payne said. “The ex¬ 
tremists will try to erode the 
strength we had, but once again 
we’ll conquer. It’s outright cruel¬ 


ty that these animals would do 
this to us at a time like this. We’re 
exhausted and still grieving, but 
we will respond out of rage this 
time, not fear,” he said. 

LEGAL CHALLENGE 

Anne Jennings, a gay commu¬ 
nity liaison on the Attorney Gen¬ 
eral’s staff, said an investigation 
of the 723,000 signatures by the 
Secretary of State would likely 
yield some bogus names. 

She said, however, that she 
doubted enough fraudulent 
signatures would be found to in¬ 
validate the initiative. 

“It’s not likely to happen,” 
Jennings said. 

Also at issue is the fact there is 
no law on the books to prohibit 
repeat initiatives such as Prop. 64 
from the ballot year after year— 
no matter how soundly they are 
defeated. 

Jennings said the Attorney 
General’s office would mount an 
investigation if it were docu¬ 
mented that laws were broken by 
LaRouchites to obtain the need¬ 
ed signatures. 

Otherwise, she said, the Attor¬ 
ney General merely records the 
initiative and writes an unbiased 
description of it for the ballot. 

Jennings said that to her know¬ 
ledge the Attorney General was 
not investigating the California- 
based LaRouchites on their fund¬ 
raising activities despite the 
LaRouche organization’s trial in 
Massachusetts on felony fraud 
charges. 

The members are charged 
with altering credit card slips 
from book orders, inflating the 
amount on the slips and diver¬ 
ting the overpayments to Lyndon 
LaRouche’s presidential cam¬ 
paign. • 


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BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5. 1987 PAGE 5 




































BAY AREA REPORTER 

OPEN FORUM 


VOL. XVII NO. 45 NOVEMBER 5, 1987 


NEXT ISSUE OUT: NOVEMBER 12 


NEXT DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 6 


(Div. of Benro Enterprises, Inc.) 
Copyright 1987 

EXECUTIVE & EDITORIAL OFFICES: 

1528 15th Street 
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TELEPHONES: 

(415) 861-5019/861-7230 

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Marcus, Richard McPherson, 
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Taylor, Rick Thoman, Paul 
Trefzger, Tom Vindeed, Dick 
Walters, Lauren Ward, Steve 
Warren, Allen White, Keith 
White, Bob Woolhouse 


Published weekly. Bay Area Reporter 
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Bay Area Reporter. Ads will not be 
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The Agnos Affair: JAccuse: 
Part II 

TO: John Van De Kamp, Attorney General, State of California , 
Arlo Smith, San Francisco District Attorney 
Louise Renne, San Francisco City Attorney 
and Joe Russinello, U.S. Attorney 

I accuse the above named officials of dereliction of duty in failing 
to investigate known and undisputed facts regarding the finan¬ 
cial affairs of Assemblyman Arthur C. Agnos. Their failure to act 
constitutes a crime upon the citizenry of San Francisco, I, therefore 
make the following official complaint to each one of them: 

THE FACTS 

I. RELATIONSHIP WITH ANGELO TSAKOPOLOUS: Agnos 
has described Sacramento developer Angelo Tsakopolous as his best 
friend and financial benefactor. 

2. TSAKOPOLOUS’ CONNECTION AS THE TRUE 
SOURCE OF LAUNDERED FUNDS: Angelo Tsakopolous has 
been named as the “true source” of $250,000 in laundered loans to 
former Sacramento County Supervisor William Bryan. 

3. TSAKOPOLOUS’ LOANS TO AGNOS: Tsakopolous has made 
15 loans to Agnos for a total of $187,603 from 1979 to 1985. 

4. TSAKOPOLOUS ASSOCIATES HAVE BEEN INDICTED: 
In April of this year the Sacramento District Attorney indicted Frank 
Pereira, a Tsakopolous associate for falsifying loan documents in an 
attempt to hide the involvement of Tsakopolous. In October of this year 


the Sacramento District attorney indicted Raymond T. Butler, an in¬ 
surance executive for orchestrating a scheme to launder a $5,000 loan 
from Tsakopolous to Sacramento City Councilman David M. Shore. 

THE LAW 

1. BRIBERY: Any person who gives or offers any bribe to any elected 
official may be subjected to imprisonment in state prison for a term 
up to four years. 

2. PERJURY: Any person who makes or files a return that is required 
to be made by law and makes false statements on said return is guilty 
of perjury. Perjury is a felony punishable by imprisonment in state 
prison. 

Based upon the above facts and law, I hereby demand that each and 
every one of the above named law enforcement officials immediately 
open an investigation into the financial affairs of Arthur C. Agnos 

Signed, Bob Ross 
Publisher 


Hearing Set For Lawsuit Against Agnos 

Lawsuit by San Francisco Taxpayers Assoc, and William O’Keefe 
on allegations against Agnos and his mishandling of campaign 
funds to be heard Dec. 10,9:30 a.m.—Dept. 5, Superior Court of 
San Francisco. 

The California Fair Political Practices Commission is also cur¬ 
rently investigating the alleged errors and omissions in Agnos’ finan¬ 
cial disclosure statements, • 


They Stole a Word 

I n 1978, Congress passed the Amateur Sports Act, which 
gave to the II,S. Olympic Committee the sole trademark 
and use of the word ‘^Olympics*** Gay people—especially 
organizers of the Gay Games, previously known as the Gay 
Olympics—have decried the law as a violation of freedom of 
speech. The Supreme Court last year sided with the U.S. 
Olympic Committee and against Gay Games. 

Last month in Congress, U.S. Rep. Gerry Studds fD-Mass.i 
said that Congress goofed in passing the 1978 law. He cited 
an Aug. 24 opinion in the New Yorker magazine as reflecting 
his view of the controversy. Studds ’ remarks and the New 
Yorker essay were published in the Congressional Record on 
Sept. 29 and are reprinted here, 

Mr. Studds: Mr. Speaker, sometimes, legislation which 
seems to us routine turns out to have consequences that are 
anything but routine. I doubt very much, for example, that 
when we passed the Amateur Sports Act of 1978, we con¬ 
templated either a frontal assault on the first amendment or 
a highly personal assault against one of our citizens. Yet we 
seem to have been a party to both. 

The following essay from the New Yorker of August 24,1987, 
tells a story that ought to give us all pause. It is very hard, 
indeed, for me to believe that this is what we intended. 


P eter Weiss is a trademark lawyer here in New York. He has de¬ 
fended, among many others, the appellations Superman, 
Channel, and Ultrasuede against those who would make free with 
them. We called him up last week to talk about the Supreme Court’s 
decision in June that the United States Olympic Committee had the 
right, under the Amateur Sports Act of 1978, to exclusive domain, for 
purposes of public identification and promotion, over the word 
“Olympics.” 

The decision came in a case called San Francisco Arts & Athletics, 
Inc., and Thomas F. Waddell v. United States Olympic Committee, in 
which the U.S.O.C. sought to enjoin the defendants from using the name 
Gay Olympics in promoting an event ultimately called the Gay Games. 

Mr. Weiss became involved in the matter as an informal consultant 
on the side of the San Francisco group. We wanted to talk to him be¬ 
cause of a lingering feeling we had that there was something extremely 
peculiar about removing a general, ancient, and, indeed, religious word 
from our language and “awarding” it, even if only for certain purposes, 
to some committee. 

M r. Weiss vastly strengthened our impression that the Amateur 
Sports Act and the Supreme Court decision upholding its con¬ 
stitutionality amounted to a linguistic theft, and that the deci¬ 
sion was kind of crazy in its details. 


“It’s preposterous—a genuine howler of an error,” he told us, “The 
U.S.O.C. got its power over the word directly from Congress, so obviously 
the action the U.S.O.C. takes with regard to this so-called trademark is 
the equivalent of state action. It’s also pretty obvious that the U.S.O.C. 
has acted in a discriminatory way in this case.” 

“Furthermore, the Court upheld a statute that didn’t even allow 
S.F.AA. the traditional defense in such cases—that there was no 
likelihood of confusion, that no one would have associated the Gay 
Olympics with anything the U.S.O.C. might sponsor. And it’s not straining 
at all to think of the name Gay Olympics as political speech and therefore 
protected by the First Amendment; the poup involved was trying to make 
a political point against stereotyping homosexuals as being unathletic. 
And, by the way, there was a dissenting opinion that made that point 
very strongly when the case was heard by the full Ninth Circuit Court, 
and the judge who wrote the dissent is generally regarded as an 
ultraconservative,” Weiss said. 

We asked Mr, Weiss what sort of precedent this decision might set. 

“Terrible,” he said. “Say the Association of International Marathons 
went to Congress and pointed out that many marathons in this country 
were bringing in people from all over the world and a lot of money, and 
that the whole thing needed to be regulated, and so forth, and they asked 
for trademark rights to the word ‘marathon.’ It would be a very similar 
set of circumstances and a perfectly logical development.” 

“If Conpess passed such a law and the President signed it, that would 
mean that the association could dole out the word to whatever events 
it deemed worthy and withhold it from those it felt were undeserving. 
In essence, Conpess actually sold a word to the Olympic Committee, 
because back in 1978 the committee said that the government would 
end up losing money if they—the committee—couldn’t regulate the 
term. And it’s the only instance I know of where the government has 
given a private party exclusive rights over a single, descriptive word,” 
Weiss said. 

After we hung up, we realized what it was, specifically, that had 
prompted us to call Mr. Weiss in the first place and what was adding 
immeasurably to our distress about the turning of a word into a com¬ 
modity: an account we’d just come across in the San Francisco Examiner 
of a memorial service for Dr. Thomas Waddell, one of the defendants 
in the U.S.O.C. suit, who had died of AIDS. (Dr. Waddell was the head 
of San Francisco Arts & Athletics, Inc.) 

The service was held in the rotunda of San Francisco’s City Hail, and 
in the course of it Dr. Waddell’s wife, Sara Lewinstein, announced that 
the U.S.O.C. had officially removed a lien it had placed on Dr. Waddell’s 
house to defray its legal costs in pursuing its case. Evidently, the house, 
which Dr. Waddell has renovated himself, was his major asset, and he’d 
wanted to pass it on to his four-year-old daughter, Jessica. He died not 
knowing for certain whether he would be able to do so. 

Ultimately, Dr. Waddell became a tireless fighter for gay rights and 
gay pride. He was, it seems clear, a man with the courage of his convic¬ 
tions, and by all accounts he was a gentle, intelligent, and charming 
person. It’s unlikely that he would ever have threatened to take away a 
dying man’s legacy to his daughter. • 


BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 6 





























Mindboggling 

★ I’ve enjoyed reading B.A.R. over the years, though 
I must admit the slow shift to the right has been 
rather obvious. But your odd endorsement of voting 
against district elections is truly mindboggling. 

W. Curling 
San Francisco 


Overlooked 

★ This is a copy of a letter sent to MasterCard. The 
charities listed included MADD/Mothers Against 
Drunk Driving and "Jerry’s Kids.” 

MasterCard International, Inc. 

P.O. Box 5255 
Clifton, N.J. 07015 

I recently saw an advertisement for your new 
charity program. While I agree that the charities you 
have chosen are important, I am dismayed that you 
have not included any organization dealing with the 
nation’s #1 health priority—AIDS. 

There are many excellent organizations current¬ 
ly lacking federal funding for the work they do. You 
have neglected a critical area of charity. I hope this 
is not based upon insensitivity, fear, or prejudica Per¬ 
haps one of the AIDS health research organizations 
could be added to your list? 

K. B. Griffith 
San Francisco 


Patient Zero 

★ The following letter was sent to California 
Magazine. 

I am writing in regards to the article “Patient Zero: 
The Man Who Brought AIDS to California,’’ by 
Randy Shilts, which appeared in the October issue 
of California magazine. 

I believe a book on the mishandling of the AIDS 
epidemic by government and the medical establish¬ 
ment is certainly important and timely. I do intend 
to read it. 

However, I also believe Shilts did a disservice to 
himself and his book by attempting to sensationalize 
the life and death of an individual. In doing so he 
has managed to create a scapegoat of Gaetan Dugas, 
a focus for those who would continue to insist AIDS 
is “their (homosexuals) fault.’’ 

As Shilts did not spend years on Dugas’ shoulder 
he is reporting hearsay and conjecture as fact giv¬ 
ing his work a slight tinge of National Enquirerism. 
“Patient Zero” tells us nothing we did not already 
know—but does manage to sully the past of a per¬ 
son who cannot present his side. 

Does Shilts believe the epidemic would not be, had 
Dugas never existed? I think not, so why focus blame 
where it does not belong? When a literary career is 
being built on the corpses of others, close examina¬ 
tion of motives and ethics is most important. 

Ron Patton 
Los Angeles 


Overstating the Case 

★ Last week’s editorial “The Agnos Affair: 
J’accuse,” makes an unfortunate contribution to the 
already malignant atmosphere of the mayoral elec¬ 
tion. It is of course your right—indeed your duty—to 
disseminate information and to take stands on issues 
of vital importance to our community. 

Wouldn’t it be more beneficial to discuss those 
issues in measured tones rather than engaging in 
vitriolic invective? Your target of course is not the 
alleged nonfeasance of the legal officials mention¬ 
ed, but rather Agnos himself. 

Although I’m a supporter of Art, I believe that 
both he and Jack Molinari are fine men and our 
friends—and I do not believe I’m alone in those feel¬ 
ings since so many respected leaders of our commu¬ 
nity are divided in their candidate choice. That is 
precisely what makes the nature of the campaign so 
disappointing and hurtful. 

Larry Sheehan 
San Francisco 


The Great March 
Letters Project 

★ I was so emotionally moved by the March on 
Washington for love and life, Oct. 10-11, that I must 
thank you, my gay and lesbian brothers and sisters, 
our friends and relatives, for coming to my home and 
making my city so beautiful with your love and 
solidarity. I will carry the experience with me always 
and it will nourish me in a million situations. 

I want to honor and enhance the love and commu¬ 
nion we created in Washington by keeping the spirit 


of the march alive. I want to do this by publishing 
a compilation of letters expressing the feelings, 
thoughts and experiences of those of you who came 
to Washington and participated in the march. 

The march was a unique experience in all of our 
lives and it will make our community stronger if we 
know how the other hundreds of thousands of gay and 
lesbian people, their friends and relatives felt about 
the march. It will be more than a souvenir, it will be 
a tangible reminder of our individual and collective 
aspirations. Therefore, I call it the Great March 
Letters Project. 

I am sending this letter to gay and lesbian 
newspapers and bookstores across the country to 
reach as many as I can that came to the march. You 
can help me tell others about the Letters Project if 
you will and contribute a valuable page to our history. 

As a practical matter, I ask you to write legibly on 
white paper, using typewriter or dark ink. Please in¬ 
clude where you live, your age and whether you are 
a gay man, a lesbian or a friend or relative. Include 
only your initials on the letter if you do not want your 
name published. I will photocopy your letter; I can¬ 
not transcribe it or decipher it. If you have other 
correspondence, please include it on a separate sheet. 
I do not have the resources to respond to inquiries, 
but I will place an announcement in this paper or 
bookstore when the Great March Letters Project is 
available. 

Please send your letters to Stephen Westfall, P.O. 
Box 11509, Cleveland Park Station, Washington, DC 
20008. 

Stephen Westfall 
Washington, DC 


Helms Ignorant 

★ The following letter was sent to Sen. Jesse Helms, 
Dear Sen. Helms: 

I am sadly disappointed at your uncompassionate 
and intolerant actions with regard to the fight against 
AIDS. Tolerance and goodwill have been the foun¬ 
dation of American liberty and morality, but you 
obviously neither respect nor uphold these real tradi¬ 
tional values. 

To believe that homosexuality is perverted is shock¬ 
ing in its display of ignorance in this day and age, 
with ample social scientific evidence that homosex¬ 
uality is a normal occurrence in nature. 

More importantly, your contention that AIDS cases 
can all be traced to homosexual acts flies in the face 
of scientific fact. The evidence from Africa alone 
bears this out. And have you never heard of AIDS in¬ 
fection from sharing contaminated intravenous 
needles? ... or from blood transfusions? 

In fact, a large proportion of AIDS cases can be 
traced to the sort of bigotry you are perpetuating. 
History already shows that government inaction was 
the central cause of the spread of AIDS. I’m afraid 
that by refusing to take every step necessary to fight 
AIDS—especially education about safe sex—you are 
effectively condemning thousands to die. But given 
your misperceptions about AIDS as an exclusively 
homosexual affliction, perhaps that is exactly what 
you want. 

Paul Reed 
San Francisco 


Best Wishes 

★ The following letter was sent to Pres. Ronald 
Reagan. 

Mr. President: 

Please accept, on Mrs. Reagan’s behalf, my con¬ 
cern over her illness and sincere best wishes for her 
speedy and complete recovery. I am sure the hearts 
of most Americans go out to you both during this 
time of personal trial. 

Please remember once this crisis is past, however, 
that most of us whose relatives and friends are ill do 
not have access to the nation’s finest health care. Your 
position, connections and wealth entitle you and 
those you love to such care. The rest of us do what 
we can. 

Fortunately, Mrs. Reagan will recover. Those I have 
loved who have died of AIDS will not. Because of the 
prejudice and penurious attitude the federal govern¬ 
ment has so far shown, those who care for those I love 
are mercilessly overworked, criminally underinform¬ 
ed and helplessly unable to offer hope. 

I am relieved for you that you have “great con¬ 
fidence in the medical personnel who are in charge” 
of Mrs. Reagan’s case. Every American would like 
to be able to say the same of those who care for those 
we love. Through no fault of the heroic doctors, nurses 
and support personnel who do their best for us, those 
of us who must deal daily with AIDS cannot. 

Our hearts are with you, Mr. Reagan. Is there room 
in yours for us? 

John Dibelka 
San Francisco 



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A. Heavy Heart 

•k The following was sent to a Bay Area bank: 

I am returning my new Visa card to you because 
I am declining any of your services. It is with a heavy 
heart that I discovered that some banks offering this 
Visa service maintain a policy of donating money to 
the U.S. Olympic Committee, (USOC), with each Visa 
card purchase. A recent court decision stated that the 
“Gay Olympics” cannot use the word “Olympics” 
for their athletic games. 

This is homophobia. As a lesbian and as a believer 
in the First Amendment, I cannot and will not tolerate 
this. The U.S. Olympic Committee has done nothing 
to initiate a challenge to this recent homophobic 
decision. Visa, instead, has offered money incentive 
to this organization by donating money to them for 
every Visa purchase made. 

I will continue to use the services of my Master- 
Card. We gays and lesbians will continue to fight for 
our long-overdue rights. 

I am retaining one-half of this Visa card in order 
that it will become part of a memorial to Dr. Tom 
Waddell, co-founder of the “Gay Olympics,” who re¬ 
cently died of AIDS. 

Janet C. Blankenship 
San Francisco 


Disenchanted with Cranston 

★ This letter was sent to Sen. Cranston in 
Washington, DC: 

Dear Sen. Cranston: 

I am thoroughly disenchanted with you after years 
of voting for you and the Democratic Party. To ally 
yourself with the likes of Jesse Helms! And on such 
an important issue as AIDS education—the only 
weapon we have at present to prevent the spread of 
AIDS! 

AIDS is transmitted only a few ways, sexually is one 
of those ways. Homosexual men have been the largest 
group in this country to suffer from AIDS. Therefore 
educational materials designed for the male homo¬ 
sexual population are appropriate to educate people 
how not to contract the virus. (As other educational 
materials must be suited to whatever target group is 
to be reached.) 

As far as the material under question being 
graphic... well, tough! You want graphic try holding 
your cousin in your arms as he dies of AIDS! Sena¬ 
tor, that is graphic. 

Actually, I believe Mr. Helms’ attack and your com¬ 
pliance are just another example of the official dis¬ 
crimination against the homosexual citizens of this 
country that has existed for 200 years. This attitude 
has cost lives in the past and this attitude will cost 
lives in the future. But politicians don’t care about 
that, do they? Winning is all that matters. 

When AIDS hits close to home, Mr. Cranston, and 
due to the logical spread of the virus, it probably will 
eventually, I hope you recall this vote for ignorance. 

Thousands and thousands of Americans will die 
from this homophobic attitude. You will say they died 
of AIDS, but really they will have died of homo¬ 
phobia. 

My disenchantment is so complete I doubt I will 
ever vote for you again. I have never voted for a Re¬ 
publican. What is a man with a conscience to do in 
this perverted version of my nation today? This vote 
of the Senate makes me ashamed to be an American. 

Timothy T. Shields 
San Francisco 


Gay>Bashing In Senate 

★ I appreciated your story (10/15/87) on the behind- 
the-scenes manuvering at the Bork Senate hearings 
to exclude the gay civil rights perspective from the 
anti-Bork testimony. However, your coverage 
neglected one obvious aspect of the hearings that 
makes the Democrats’ spinelessness vis-a-vis gay civil 
rights even more condemnable: Several of the more 
conservative senators actively gay-bashed through¬ 
out the hearings. 

During the testimony of several law professors from 
Harvard, one senator made statements such as (I 
paraphrase): “Under your definition of privacy, 
people would have the right to commit sodomy in the 
bedroom, homosexuals could get married, people 
could do cocaine in their living rooms, and prosti¬ 
tution would be legalized.” 

The professor being questioned correctly respond¬ 
ed that such inflammatory rhetoric was irrelevant to 
the issue under discussion: i.e. Judge Bork’s limited 
interpretation of the Constitution allows for no 
privacy rights, making debates about who is and is 
not entitled to privacy moot. 

This kind of verbal gay-bashing occurred no fewer 
than three times when I was watching the hearings 
on television, and I wouldn’t be a bit surprised if it 
occurred more often. At no point was a single defense 


of gay rights made by any senator or witness, not even 
by the ultra-liberal Paul Simon, who says he favors 
gay rights legislation. Any discussion of gay rights 
was taboo, along with a woman’s right to an abortion; 
once again the Democrats caved in to the political 
baiting by right-wingers. 

Imagine if these hearings had been held 25 years 
ago. Those same senators who now so openly vilify 
gay people, might have asked Barbara Jordan: “Well, 
under your interpretation of the Constitution, black 
people would be able to eat in the same restaurants 
as whites, share our bathrooms, and even go to the 
same school as our children.” 

No such statements are possible now, given the ad¬ 
vances that have been made in making racism a great 
taboo (i.e. If you are racist, you better make long and 
loud protestations that you’re not). 

In this respect the hearings showed the great 
strides that have been made in America and how far 
we have yet to go to create a truly just and equal 
society, and how hard the gay community will have 
to fight against people like Jesse Helms, Strom Thur¬ 
mond, and their allies in Congress to stave off the 
wave of hatred they are stirring up against us. 

David Thompson 
San Francisco 


God Help Vs All 

★ In a day and age when so many people are becom¬ 
ing ill with AIDS; and myself experiencing first hand 
the effects of having the disease, I find it necessary 
to speak the following words. These are directed to 
those afflicted and to those whose lives have been af¬ 
fected through having known someone with the 


We must stop thinking of us who have an AIDS 
diagnosis as having a death sentence; moreso, a pro¬ 
motion to Glory. There is so much life to live before 
the finality of death. That eventuality faces everyone. 
If we learn to live life to the fullest, then, and only 
then, can we say, we lived. 

Keep faith and hope; death is but a journey to a 
better life. God help us all. 

George H. Goutier, Jr. 

San Francisco 


Love Yoa All 

★ This letter is directed to all those individuals who 
went to Washington, D.C. for the big march. For those 
of us unable to attend for various reasons, I just 
wanted to say thanks for representing me and all the 
others who had to stay home. You have my undying 
gratitude and respect, not just for the expense and 
inconvenience you had to endure, or the arrests and 
fines for some, but because you cared so much for 
all of us and for yourselves. 

It was heartwarming to see such a huge turnout. 
After talking to many friends who did attend, it 
became more apparent just how earthshaking the 
whole experience was, including the mixed emotions 
of anger, joy and sadness. Your trip was not in vain. 
It inspired me to not only donate my forthcoming tax 
refund to all gay causes, but to again write my 
legislators and bitterly complain about their treat¬ 
ment of gays and the AIDS issue. 

Those of you who went to D.C. may think you did 
not accomplish much. Nothing could be farther from 
the truth. As the United Fund slogan goes, I don’t 
know you, but I love you all! 

Dean Tomich 
San Jose 


No Time for Time 

★ The following letter was sent to Time magazine: 

I have heard over and over again that we have a 
suppression of news in America. I have never believed 
it. I do now. 

Sunday, Oct. 11, over 500,000 people marched 
peacefully for gay rights. Jesse Jackson spoke to the 
largest crowd he has ever addressed. Over 800 men 
and women were arrested in the act of civil disobe¬ 
dience and the Supreme Court was closed to the pub¬ 
lic for the first time in its history. 

Respectfully, peacefully, and with love, we put our 
case before the American people. All the major 
newspapers and other media in this country, Europe, 
and Japan carried this major event. Time did not. 

Not one word on one of the biggest protest marches 
in U.S. history! I wonder what else is not being re¬ 
ported by Time due to homophobia. 

Lester W. Thayer 
San Francisco 


BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5. 1987 PAGE 8 














































Success 

★ I’d like to thank everyone who helped make my 
beer bust at the SF Eagle a success. The performers, 
Marga Gomez, Deena Jones, Tommi Rose, Dennis 
Patkose, Barry Brady, Brad Mason, Dave Ford, and 
the Blazing Redheads, all donated their time and 
were great. The MC’s, 1987 Leather Daddy Zack 
Long and 1987 Leather Daddy’s Boy John Casas kept 
everything moving right along while the members 
of the California Eagles M/C poured beer and sold 
admissions and raffle tickets. I also want to thank 
Mark Kliem and Alan Selby for their hard work and 
Teddy Balloons for donating the decorations. 

We took in $1,914 from the door, raffle tickets, and 
four donations of $100. Terry Thompson and the SF 
Eagle donated the beer and my lover, Carl Wolf, 
donated the cost of the sound system, the design of 
the flyers, and the cake. The raffle winner, Dennis 
Castle, donated his prize winnings of $350. So, there 
were no expenses. $957 goes to the SF AIDS 
Emergency Fund and $957 goes to the 4th Annual 
People With AIDS Thanksgiving Dinner. 

Finally, a big thank you to Mark Friese, Deidre, 
Mr. Marcus, and the B.A.R. for doing so much to pro¬ 
mote the show and ensure it’s success. You’ve helped 
make a lot of people happy on Thanksgiving. 

Danny Williams 
San Francisco 


Cancel Subscription 

★ More than 350,000 people spent more than $175 
million to go to Washington, D.C. for one of the 
largest demonstrations ever in Washington, and a 
quilt with the names of people who have died of AIDS 
that is larger than a football field. More than 800 
people were arrested at the Supreme Court, the 
largest number since the Vietnam War. And this was 
not news to Time and Newsweek. 

Well it is time for the gay community to show Time 
and Newsweek that we can make the news when we 
give them more than 100,000 subscription cancella¬ 
tions nationwide Cancel your subscriptions! Get your 
friends to cancel! 

If they can ignore us. Let’s ignore them! 

Greg L. Pennington 
San Francisco 


Boys Will Be Boys 

★ I would like to express outrage over the highly in¬ 
flammatory and extremely misleading Commentary 
cum article by one of your writers about the most re¬ 
cent Boy Party. Never have I read such sweeping 
generalizations and petty stereotypes about the peo¬ 
ple who attended a party. 

The author of the article walked into what was 
merely a college-oriented party. Upon seeing a large 
crowd of clean-cut young people having a good time, 
the author’s defenses and insecurities apparently 
went up and he lumped all the people into one con¬ 
venient category and proceeded to deliver a bitchy 
character assassination against all those present. His 
pettiness even brought him down to the level where 
he was giving catty opinions on hair mousse! 

From the tone of the article (can bitchiness really 
be considered a valid journalistic tone?) it is obvious 
that the author must have a gigantic chip on his 
shoulder. The Boy Party merely provided a focus of 
all his built-up frustrations. He seems especially 
obsessed and bitter about what he perceived as the 
universal youth and beauty of the party. 

The Boy Parties originated at Cal Berkeley, and 
were started as an alternative to dark and smokey 
cruise bars. They have always been primarily by 
private invitation. Our main considerations in our 
door policy are to limit the entrance to those with in¬ 
vitations and their guests, and to ensure that the par¬ 
ties remain primarily a college-oriented crowd. 

The realities of the space limitations of Sutter’s 
Mill weigh heavily in our restrictive door policy. Our 
priority in admittance is those with invitations. As 
it is, the parties are unbearably crowded. 

In the article there are so many inaccuracies, false 
innuendos, fantastic presumptions, etc. that jour¬ 
nalistically, the article is a joke. 

None of the hosts were ever questioned during or 
after the event. No attempt is made to allow for any 
objectivity. This writer plays judge, jury, and 
hangman. 

He accuses the party of being too young, too white, 
and too beautiful, claiming that there were only 35 
nonwhites at any one time (the club only holds 300 
people at a time so that accounts for about 10 per¬ 
cent) and intimates that we are racist. Well, let’s take 
a look at where the author is coming from: 

How many gay minority photos were in the B.A.R. 
last week? None. I cannot find a single gay of color 
in the entire edition—including the sex ads. The only 
three minorities represented are in the boy photo. 
Does this mean that the B.A.R. is necessarily racist 


among other things? Of course not, because it is not 
enough to make such a condemnation from super¬ 
ficial observations. And that is what this writer did 
in his article—one superficial and meaningless point 
after another. 

My point is that “Those who live in glass houses 

Part of being part of the gay community is the 
recognition and acceptance of our differences. We 
are all very diverse, and this should be celebrated— 
not condemned. A large part of the article seems to 
condemn the attendees simply because they do not 
fit the author’s view of what is “politically correct.’’ 

If there is room for events for people into leather, 
the Republican party, drag, levis, S&M, sweaters, 
Macy’s, jack-off clubs, women of color, then why can’t 
there be one for a predominantly collegiate crowd? 
The author gives us too much credit for too many 
beastly things in this world (fortunately cannibalism 
was not mentioned). 

The Boy Parties aren’t a social force. They are 
merely events to create a sense of community. I think 
that their popularity indicates that the gay commu¬ 
nity is not adequately servicing the needs of our 
youth. 

If any journalistic credibility is to be maintained, 
the author owes an apology to the many people who 
attended the last Boy Party who became innocent vic¬ 
tims of what was a vicious and needless petty com¬ 
mentary. 

Benjamin B. Dhong 
for the Boy Party 


Strict Constructionist 

★ In writing my first-ever letter to the editor of the 
Bay Area Reporter, (Oct. 8), I took care to keep it 
short. The issue I addressed, the ideological bases 
of Supreme Court appointments, is one that B.A.R. 
would concern itself with only when it interfaced with 
gay life and liberation. Now, however, because of a 
misinformed response to my letter by features editor 
Will Snyder, I am forced to write again. 

It’s ridiculous. But since my knowledge has been 
maligned in print, I have no choice. 

I chose my words very carefully when I wrote that 
Reagan was relatively unique in applying a “heavy 
ideological bias’’ to Supreme Court appointments. 
I deliberately wrote “heavy.” When I wrote that 
Reagan (along with Johnson) was prone to nominees 
“assured” to vote a certain way, I meant exactly what 
I wrote. The history of Richard Nixon’s nominations 
to the Court do not belie these sentiments, whatever 
Snyder may think. 

Of the four nominations which Nixon managed to 
have ratified by the Senate, only one, William Rehn- 
quist (now Chief Justice) ended up on the extreme 
right. Chief Justice Warren Berger (sic.) occupied the 
center-right, LouisfsicJ Powell the absolute center, and 
Harry Blackmun the center-left. 

Yes, Nixon promised to appoint “strict construc¬ 
tionists” during the 1968 campaign. He also said he 
had a secret plan to end the Vietnam War. Once 
elected and faced with a Democratic-controlled Sen¬ 
ate, however, Nixon appointed Justices largely to the 
left of strict construction. The two nominees whom 
the Senate rejected (Haynsworth and Carswell) were 
not strict constructionists, either. And they were not 
rejected for ideological reasons. 

All of this is in sharp contrast to Reagan’s prac¬ 
tice of choosing Justices from among the one-percent 
most right-wing federal judges in the country. Nix¬ 
on’s appointments were /fgAt/j ideological. None of 
this should be news to anybody. It’s been rehashed 
continually in the commentaries run by mass- 
circulation newspapers and magazines in the wake 
of the controversy ensuing the Bork nomination. 

Next time I write B.A.R., I’ll make sure to dot every 
i and cross every t, laboriously defending myself 
against any minor caveat that anyone might raise 
against my main argument. This won’t have much 
to do with the business of gay liberation, but it might 
prevent me from being “corrected” by half-educated 
editors. 

Stuart Byron 
Los Angeles 

ED. NOTE: While there were many factors 
in the rejections ofHaymsicorth and Carswell, 
“strict construction” played a big part. In its 
1970 hook, Nixon: The First Year of His 
Presidency, Congressional Quarterly cites not 
only organized labor's charge of conflict of in¬ 
terest by the judge, but also Sen. Jacob Javitts ’ 
charge of racial insensitivity because of 
Haynsworth's constructionist views (p. 87). 
While Carswell lost favor because of member¬ 
ship in a private, allegedly racist club, Nix¬ 
on had his own views. In John Ehrlichman’s 
Witness To Power (1982), Nixon blamed the 
defeats on the Senate, which would not ap¬ 
prove “any Federal appellate judge from the 
South who believes as I do in the strict con¬ 
struction of the Constitution.” (pp. 108-110) 

Will Snyder 


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Nov. 7: 7:30 pm - An Evening with Adrienne Rich 
Advance tickets necessary 

Nov. 8: 10:30 am - Morning Worship with Holy Communion 
Rev. Dr. Karen Ziegler, pastor of MCC/NY 
1:00 pm - Art Auction 

7:00 pm - Concert with NYC Cabaret Singer 
Randa McNamara 

Nov. 11: 7:30 pm - Men Together 

150 Eureka 
863-4434 

Childcare & Sign Language Provided 

\i t I R I) I' () I I I T~\ ' at morning services 

oV^'s'^VO'i'k Mitulski, Pastor 



BACK ATTACK? 



For some reason around 8 o’clock each night everyone in town 
pours in for beer and pizza. After six years in the business I’m used 
to being busy, but I never get used to the “BACK ATTACK." 

After lugging heavy trays for hours my spine feels like it’s been 
in a trash compactor. So for relief I go to Cathedral Hill Chiroprac¬ 
tic. They understand my problem and are expert at correcting it. 

Thank goodness for Cathedral Hill Chiropractic and thank good¬ 
ness I’ve got Worker’s Compensation—they cover my bills 100%. 


771-5595 



Cathedral Hill 
Chiropractic Clinic 

Dr. James Wehinger Dr. Philip DelPozzo Dr. Michael J. Schmidt 


1115 Geary Boulevard (between Franklin & Van Ness) 


BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 9 































































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Press In; Eu Out 


C laiming that she had to 
choose between her can¬ 
didacy and her marriage, 
California Secretary of State 
March Fong Eu formally pull¬ 
ed out of the race for the 1988 
Democratic Senate nomination. 
While citing a number of other 
factors in her decision to drop 
her candidacy, Eu said the major 
reason she was withdrawing was 
the financial disclosure re¬ 
quirements in federal campaigns. 
It would mean that Eu and her 
husband, Henry Eu, would be 
forced to disclose much more 
about Mr. Eu’s business than 
they would choose to do. 

Eu, a resident of Singapore, 
comes from an extremely wealthy 
family, and has always kept the 
nature of his wealth a closely- 
guarded secret. Even the Secre¬ 
tary’s closest personal friends 
have no apparent idea of the 
source of Mr. Eu’s finances other 
than that his father and grand¬ 
father have business interests in 
Hong Kong and Singapore. 
Henry Eu reportedly manages 
the family interests. 

Secretary Eu issued a press 
release last week that simply said: 
“My marriage relationship is 
such that I am unable to disclose 
financial information regarding 
my spouse, who is not a citizen of 
this country. I am, to a significant 
degree, forced to choose between 
my marriage and my candidacy 
for the Senate. Put to such a 
choice, there is no contest. I will 
not run.” 

Eu’s withdrawal seems to have 
left Lt. Gov. Leo McCarthy the 
heavy favorite to be the Demo¬ 
crat’s candidate against first- 
term Republican incumbent 
Pete Wilson. 

But liberal Democrats were 
this week urging Los Angeles TV 
commentator Bill Press to enter 
the race as soon as he can. Press 
has been considering a can¬ 
didacy for some time and has 
traveled the state the past few 
months lining up possible sup¬ 
port. San Francisco Sup. Harry 
Britt is among those who are 
thought to favor a Press can¬ 
didacy. Press indicated this week 
that he was about to take on 
McCarthy for the nomination. 

Saying that Eu’s withdrawal 
“is like a neon sign saying to me, 
‘Enter here,”’ Press admitted 
that Eu’s announcement “does 
make the race a lot more attrac¬ 
tive, and it increases the likeli¬ 
hood I will run. It leaves the field 
crying for a new face with new 
energy and new ideas.” 

Eu had raised only $200,000 
for her race, far behind the figure 
reportedly raised by McCarthy. 
She had put her candidacy on 
hold last July to concentrate her 
efforts on a ballot initiative that 
would provide money to local law 
enforcement agencies. She said 



March Fong Eu 


that effort took much of her time 
and contributed, as well, to her 
decision. Eu, a former Oakland 
Assemblywoman, was first elect¬ 
ed Secretary of State in 1974, and 
last year became the state’s 
biggest-ever vote getter, receiving 
69 percent of the vote in last 
year’s statewide contest. 

Early polls show a Wilson- 
McCarthy contest to be a toss-up, 
and many state Democrats feel 
that a Bill Press candidacy would 
give their party a new face with 
some new political ideas, some¬ 
thing they could hardly expect 
from the well-worn, career politi¬ 
cian Leo McCarthy. 

R onald Reagan seems to 
have gone out of his way 
to pick another confirma¬ 
tion fight by nominating Judge 
Douglas Ginsburg, an apparent 
Bork clone to the Supreme 
Court. You can bet on another 
knock-down fight with the Senate 
on this one. 

I never know how much en¬ 
dorsements mean, but Art Ag- 
nos had the backing of the Ex¬ 
aminer, Progress, Bay Guardian, 
Sun Reporter, S.F. Business 
Times and the lesbian/gay Com¬ 
ing Up! John Molinari was en¬ 
dorsed by the Chronicle, S.F. In¬ 
dependent, S.F. Post, Bay Area 
Reporter and the Sentinel. 

And sports heroes? Willie 
McCovey endorsed Molinari 
while Willie Mays backed Agnos. 
Molinari probably gained one 
there since McCovey votes in the 
city while Mays lives in Atherton. 

Longtime gay/political activist 
Jack Campbell of Miami was 
recently elected president of the 
National Association of Gay and 
Lesbian Democratic Clubs. 

A number of local big-name 
Democrats are expected to be in 
L.A. Dec. 5 when all six remain¬ 
ing Demo presidential candi¬ 
dates will be attending a “roast¬ 
ing” of Senate Majority Whip 
Alan Cranston. L.A. Mayor 


Tom Bradley will be dinner 
chair and it’s all a fundraiser for 
Independent Action, Rep. Mor¬ 
ris Udall’s political action com¬ 
mittee that supports liberal can¬ 
didates. 

Pat Robertson, seeking the 
GOP presidential nomination, 
seems determined to make AIDS 
a major issue in that race. Rev. 
Robertson said in Illinois this 
week that a guarantine of AIDS 
patients “may not be a bad 
idea,” adding that “the right of 
the citizenry to survive outweighs 
the rights of a small minority to 
have privacy.” 

R obertson, in other bursts 
of political genius, also 
promised to “shut down 
the government” rather than 
give “one dime of taxpayers 
money to groups like Planned 
Parenthood that counsel abor¬ 
tion. The former television 
evangelist also pledged to “bring 
God back into the classroom” 
and said he would give tax breaks 
for “mothers who want to stay 
home and take care of their 
children.” 

While the projected reports 
predicted that Pope John 
Paul II’s recent visit would cost 
“around $2 million,” the word is 
that bills are still coming into the 
S.F. Archdiocese. The figure for 
the pontiffs 22-hour stop has 
already topped $3.4 million. 

District Attorney Arlo Smith 
was re-elected again this week 
with no opposition and political 
insiders are already suggesting 
that Smith would make a strong 
candidate for Attorney General, 
if, as expected, incumbent John 
Van de Kamp seeks the Demo 
nomination for governor. 

It was announced in Washing¬ 
ton this week that a foundation 
started in memory of the late 
Rep. Stewart McKinney (R- 
Conn.), who died this summer of 
AIDS, hopes to pay for homes for 
AIDS patients across the countrv. 

• 


Scandal Unearthed 
By Historical Society 

The Bay Area Gay and Lesbian 
Historical Society will present a 
lecture by David G. Cameron 
about a 60-year-old homosexual 
scandal on Sunday afternoon, 
Nov. 8, 2-5 p.m. The lecture will 
be presented at the Names Pro¬ 
ject, 2362 Market St., San Fran¬ 
cisco. General admission is $5; 
free to Historical Society mem¬ 
bers. 

In 1914,30 men were arrested 
by Long Beach vice officers 
assigned to wipe out immorality. 
These arrests burst into public 
notice when one of the arrested 
poisoned himself. • 


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BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 10 

















































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Adrienne Rich to 
Hold Reading 

Congregation Sha’ar Zahav, in 
association with Metropolitan 
Community Church, is sponsor¬ 
ing a poetry reading by Adrienne 
Rich called And Your Daughters 
Shall Prophesy, on Saturday, Nov. 
7. The reading is being held in 
the MCC sanctuary at 150 Eure¬ 
ka Street, San Francisco, at 
7:30 p.m. 

On Friday, Nov. 6, at 8:15 p.m.. 
Dr. Naomi Janewitz, professor of 
religious studies at UC Davis is 
speaking at Shabbat services at 
Congregation Sha’ar Zahav, 220 
Danvers Street, San Francisco. 
And on Sunday, Nov. 8, at 11 a,m.. 
Rev. Karen Ziegler, pastor of 
MCC New York, is speaking at 
morning services at MCC. • 


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While the process sounds sim¬ 
ple, not everyone seeking to 
adopt gets exactly what he or she 
requests. Healthy white babies, 
for instance, are simply not avail¬ 
able. “Most of our kids are black, 
ranging in age from six months 
to six or seven years,” states 
Quinn. “What we most need are 
homes for black kids. We try to 
match children and parents 
racially. We do go trans-racial, 
however, if an unreasonable 
length of time passes with no 
more suitable prospects for the 
child.” 

A nother potential difficulty 
for prospective parents is 
that the vast majority of 
children in San Francisco are not 
relinquinshed by their birth 
parents voluntarily. They are 
abused and battered children 
who have been taken away from 
their parents by the courts. Two 
percent of these are returned to 
their natural parents eventually. 
The rest are placed with prospec¬ 
tive parents in a foster home un¬ 
til they are legally free to be 
adopted. Fully 90 to 95 percent of 
the people who adopt through 
the Adoption Program do so 
through the city’s plan. 

In all, between 1982 and 1986, 
the Adoption Program supervis¬ 
ed 300 placements. Of these, 
twelve (four percent), were gay 
placements (eight men and four 
women)—‘although it’s possible 
that some of the parents didn’t 
identify themselves as gay,” 
notes Quinn. 

Most of the children placed 
with gay couples were “disadvan¬ 
taged” in some way. Several had 


medical risks, including AIDS. 
Others had emotional problems. 
Most were members of a minor¬ 
ity group. This does not indicate, 
however, that gay people are seen 
as a last resort for otherwise 
unplaceable children for the sim¬ 
ple reason that “nearly all the 
kinds we place are disadvantag¬ 
ed in some way,” says Quinn. 

One factor that does set gay 
people apart when it comes to 
adoptions, unfortunately, is 
AIDS. “AIDS has been discuss¬ 
ed a lot,” admits Quinn, “be¬ 
cause one of our adoptive parents 
died of AIDS. We decided not to 
require testing but to encourage 
people to be honest about the 
state of their health. Being at risk 
for AIDS doesn’t matter to us, 
but there must be a plan for the 
child’s upbringing in case of 
death or disability.” 

In spite of this concern, gay 
people find adopting children in 
San Francisco not only possible 
but, with perseverance, probable. 
That was unthinkable scarcely 
more than a decade ago. In 
another decade, things may be 
even better for gay prospective 
parents. Thanks to attorneys for 
the Lesbian Rights Project, who 
are challenging the state’s policy 
not to grant gay couples joint 
custody, there may one day be no 
difference at all in the way gay 
and straight adoption requests 
are handled. 

If so, agency directors in Kan¬ 
sas and Georgia may be scandal¬ 
ized. But one particular director 
in San Francisco will be pleased 
—and so will a lot of homeless 
children. • 


All In a Day's Work 


I f a gay couple in Topeka, 
Kansas or Valdosta, Georgia 
applied to adopt a child 
through a public adoption agen¬ 
cy, its director would probably ad¬ 
vise them to forget it. Here in San 
Francisco, however, processing 
adoption requests from gay peo¬ 
ple is all in a day’s work for Brian 
Quinn, supervisor for the city’s 
Adoption Program, part of the 
Child Welfare Division of the 
Department of Social Services. 

States Quinn, “In San Francis¬ 
co it’s very possible for gay peo¬ 
ple to adopt, not that we don’t 
still have some residual homo¬ 
phobia. The way the law works 
now is that only singles or mar¬ 
ried couples may adopt—but the 
law says nothing about sexual 
preference. Therefore, even 
though gay couples may not 
adopt jointly (for the state 
doesn’t recognize their union), 
they may still adopt as individ¬ 
uals.” 

The requirements gay people 
must meet in order to adopt are 
the same as those for straight 
people, Quinn continues. Finan¬ 
cial and job security are the main 
requirements, but these he 
describes as “pretty loose.” On 
one hand, welfare is not general¬ 
ly considered adequate income; 
on the other, home ownership is 
not a necessity. 

“The main factor is whether 
or not another person can be 
added to the household without 
significantly altering the stan¬ 
dard of living,” Quinn explains. 

Money is often less of a prob¬ 
lem than people think, claims 
Quinn, for most of the children 
available for adoption in San 
Francisco come from adverse 
backgrounds. Their adoptions 
are therefore often accompanied 
by a subsidy which includes 
medical and/or cash grants. This 
is especially true for minorities, 
sibling groups, and children with 
psychological problems. 

T he procedure for adopting 
a child through the city’s 
Adoption Program is rela¬ 
tively simple but is open only to 
San Francisco residents. After 
calling the program (557-5376), 
prospective parents attend an in¬ 
quiry meeting where the adop¬ 
tion process is explained. There 
they are given an application 
packet consisting of employ¬ 
ment, reference, and medical 
papers. 

Once these are completed, a 
series of interviews with a social 
worker is scheduled. Questions 
asked include motives for adop¬ 
tion, family background, and per¬ 
sonal attitudes about children. 
“The purpose of this Home 
Study,” states Quinn, “is not to 
rule out the prospective parent 


As far as we know, the author has never contemplated adoption 

(Photo: R. Pruzan) 


but to find out what kind of child 
would be happiest there.” 

The final decision concerning 
placement is made by a matching 


committee, including Quinn, the 
child’s social worker, adoption 
case workers, and a psychological 
consultant. 


BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 11 































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Police Brutality Charged In D.C. Arrests 


V^SHINGTON, D.C.—Police in the nation’s 
capital were charged with abusing people arrested 
Oct. 13 in the massive civil disobedience action in 
front of the U.S. Supreme Court. Over 800 people 
were arrested in the protest of recent court rulings 
against gay and lesbian rights. 

Some protesters alleged that police subjected 
women prisoners to blood tests for syphilis and to 
strip searches, denied people with AIDS access to 
food and medication, dropped some demonstra¬ 
tors as they were being carried to jail, and sub¬ 
jected others to clubbings and choke holds. 

Jessica Shubow, a civil disobedience coordinator 
for the National March, said that Ifegal action may 
be taken against Washington, D.C. police and U.S. 
marshalls involved in the arrests. 

“Not since the black civil rights movement have 
people committing civil disobedience been so 
despised by the police,” said Shubow. 

Some demonstrators described being humili¬ 
ated by police who taunted them with verbal 


harassment. One man with AIDS was reported to 
have been forced to lick a dropped pill off the floor 
while police watched. A deaf woman was hospital¬ 
ized with nerve damage to her hand because hand¬ 
cuffs were too tight. 

Half of those arrested were released within 36 
hours after they paid a $100 fine. Others pled guilty 
and served three days in jail. Twelve people pled 
not guilty and face trial Dec. 2. 

One woman arrested told the judge hearing her 
case about “the incredibly deplorable treatment 
we have received.” 

“Two PWAs who are lovers were separated 
despite a clear medical and emotional need to be 
together,” she said. “People were kicked, pushed, 
shoved and had anti-AIDS, anti-gay, anti-woman, 
and anti-lesbian remarks hurled at them.” 

Despite the harsh treatment, most of those ar¬ 
rested said that they were proud of what they did. 

—Philadelphia Gay News 


AIDS Panel Sued; No PWA Reps 

PHILADELPHIA— A co- 

alition of civil rights and AIDS 
organizations have filed suit 
against Pres. Reagan’s Commis¬ 
sion on AIDS. They ask that the 
commission be put on hold until 
its current two vacancies are 
filled with people who have ex¬ 
perience in research or working 
with people who have the disease. 

The Public Citizen Litigation 
Group said it would seek a tem¬ 
porary restraining order depend¬ 
ing on how the commission 
responded in the near future. The 
coalition is also made up of the 
American Civil Liberties Union 
and four AIDS organizations. 

The commission has a dead- 


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line of Dec. 7 for a preliminary 
report. Admiral James D. Wat¬ 
kins, newly appointed head of the 
panel, has said he was confident 
that the deadline would be met. 
Watkins also pledged that the 
commission would reach out to 
AIDS groups, gay people and 
civil rights organizations in 
determining its policy recom¬ 
mendations. 

Watkins named Polly L. Gault 
as executive director of the panel. 
Gault was staff director for the 
Senate subcommittee on educa¬ 
tion and the humanities but she 
is regarded as a tough adminis¬ 
trator. Her first task is to hire 
eight staff members for the AIDS 
commission. 

At a recent meeting of the Bus¬ 
iness Council, Watkins remarked 
that until confidentiality of HIV 
test results are guaranteed, 
“we’re not going to answer the 


fear of those who may be af¬ 
flicted.” He told business leaders 
that they should have education 
programs for their employees to 
cut down on fear. 

But critics maintained that it 
was a serious flaw that the panel 
did not have a person with AIDS 
on it. “Having a commission 
study AIDS without represen¬ 
tatives of persons with AIDS on 
the commission is like having a 
sickle cell anemia commission 
without blacks,” said Patti 
Goldman of the Public Citizens 
Litigation Group. 

—Philadelphia Gay News 


Letters: The liveliest 
communitY forum. 
Every week in 

Bay Area Reporter. 


GOP's Kemp Wants AIDS Testing 


NEW' YORK—Republican 
presidential candidate Jack 
Kemp, a congressperson from 
New York, has proposed required 
testing of immigrants, health 
workers, hosptial patients, and 
those undergoing routine medi¬ 
cal checkups. His policy would 
also require testing people who 
are seeking insurance and mar¬ 
riage licenses as well as those ar¬ 
rested for drug use and prostitu¬ 
tion, and others “whose blood is 
already tested for other com- 


Judge Ducks Suit 
On Job Bias 

NORFOLK, VA-A Virginia 

judge has refused to hear a 
lawsuit by a gay man complain¬ 
ing that he was discriminated 
against by his employer. Judge 
William Guerry declined to hear 
the case, saying that the matter 
should go before the state’s 
Supreme Court. 

Michael Wolfe claims in his 
lawsuit that Tidewater Pizza 
suspended him for four weeks un¬ 
til he proved that he was not in¬ 
fected with the AIDS virus. He 
said that his hours were reduced 
from 40 to 15 per week after the 
suspension and that fellow 
employees reacted coolly toward 
him after the incident. 

Wolfe’s attorney Kenneth 
Labowitz said he has yet to start 
procedures to get the case before 
the Virginia Supreme Court. 

—Our Own Community 
Press (Norfolk) 


municable diseases.” 

Kemp also has his version of 
an AIDS education program 
which would stress “traditional 
views of sex and marriage (as) the 
best means for preventing the 
spread of the AIDS virus.” 

—Bravo of San Diego 


Protests In Turkey 
Over Bar Raids 

ISTANBUL—Gay people in 
two Turkish cities have gone on 
a hunger strike to protest police 
raids on gay bars in Ankara and 
Istanbul. They also accused po¬ 
lice of brutality in making the 
raids. 

Although homosexuality is 
legal in Turkey, police have raid¬ 
ed bars, beating up patrons and 
shaving the heads of those ar¬ 
rested. They have also forced 
those arrested to submit to tests 
for venereal diseases. 

The International Lesbian and 
Gay Association has called for in¬ 
ternational solidarity with pro¬ 
test actions and letters to the 
Turkish government. 

Letters can be sent to Excel¬ 
lency Turgat Ozal, prime min¬ 
ister, Government Palace, 
Ankara, Turkey. Copies should be 
sent to the gay organization 
LaMartin, c/23-6 Taksim, Istan¬ 
bul, Turkey. 

—Gay Community News 
Boston 


BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 12 












































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San Francisco, CA 94103 
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TDD 415-864-6606 


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Runoff Promises 
To Be a Bruiser 


Agnos Expects Tough Fight; 
Molinari Shakes Up Campaign Staff 

by Wayne Friday 


Agnos told an enthusiastic 
crowd at his headquarters Tues¬ 
day night that “politicians have 
always promised participation in 
the decisions that affect people’s 
lives, but we made it happen in 
this campaign.” While suggest¬ 
ing that he was expecting a tough 
fight from Molinari, Agnos cam¬ 
paign organizers were privately 
predicting an easy win in the 
Dec. 8 final election. 


Molinari, saying that he was 
looking forward to the 35-day 
runoff campaign, promised Ag¬ 
nos the “fight of his political 
life.” He said that his campaign 
would be one “to stop irrespon¬ 
sibility from becoming public 
policy.” He urged third-place 
finisher Roger Boas to join him. 

Whether Molinari can over¬ 
come the 2-to-l edge that Agnos 
built in Tuesday’s election re¬ 
mains to be seen. But Agnos 
clearly has to be considered the 
favorite to win it all next month. 


Molinari promised to shake-up 
his campaign structure this week. 
He has already hired Jack Davis, 
State Sen. Quentin Kopp’s long¬ 
time advisor, to take over direc¬ 
tion of the runoff campaign. The 
candidate himself was campaign¬ 
ing at bus stops before daylight 
Wednesday morning asking 
voters for help in the upcoming 
campaign. 


Adopting a new campaign 
theme: “Molinari for Mayor. Be¬ 
cause San Francisco is Worth 
Fighting For,” the Molinari camp 
took on a new look Wednesday. 
Besides Davis as campaign 
manager, other new campaign 
principals included prominent 
attorney Jeremiah Hallisay, Dick 
Pabich, a respected political con¬ 
sultant who is close to Sup. Harry 
Britt, and union organizer Steve 
Newberger, who will direct the 
Molinari field operation. 

The Agnos-Molinari runoff 
battle promises to be a tough, 
hard-fought campaign with the 
winner on Dec. 8 taking over 
from Dianne Feinstein who 
leaves office in January after nine 


State Assemblymember Art Agnos ran up an impressive 
23-point edge over his closest rival, Sup. John Molinari. Agnos 
came within two percentage points Tuesday Nov. 3 of being 
elected mayor of San Francisco. Running strong in all areas 
of the city, Agnos came up short of winning a majority, how¬ 
ever, and will face Molinari in a Dec. 8 showdown. 

With all votes counted, Agnos 
led with 88,285 (48 percent) over 
Molinari, with 45,566 (25 per¬ 
cent), and businessman Roger 
Boas, who took 39,769 votes (22 
percent). Newspaper columnist 
Warren Hinckle polled 5,095 
votes (3 percent). Six other minor 
candidates scored under one per¬ 
cent each. 

John Molinari, for over a year 
believed to be the logical suc¬ 
cessor to Mayor Dianne Fein¬ 
stein, saw his commanding lead, 
that he had held since the first of 
the year, slip away. Political 
observers agreed that Agnos’s 
surprisingly strong showing 
makes him the odds-on favorite 
to win next month’s runoff elec¬ 
tion. 


years as mayor. 

In other races. District Attor¬ 
ney Arlo Smith, running unop¬ 
posed, was re-elected to a third 
term. Sheriff Michael Hennessey 
easily won re-election over two 
minor candidates. 

On the city proposition votes. 
Prop. P (district election of super¬ 
visors), which most observers ex¬ 
pected would pass, was defeated 
by a 56 percent to 44 percent vote. 
Prop. W (new baseball park), lost 
by a 53 percent to 47 percent 
margin. Prop. A (Police facilities 
bond), B (street improvement 
bond), F (neighborhood parking 
lot), (i (office of citizens com- 


A smiling Art Agnos greeted supporters at his campaign headquarters election night 

(Photo: S. Savage) 


plaints), H (deputy sheriff proba¬ 
tion time), I (deputy sheriff retire¬ 
ment), J (union pensions), L 
(county clerk’s office), N (election 
filing deadline), 0 (health service 
board election), R (utility tax 
ban), T (public land voting 
rights), U (nuclear freeze zone), V 


(consumer apartheid boycott)— 
all were passed by the voters 
Tuesday. Prop Q, the firefighters 
initiative, lost. 

In other elections. Democrats 
won the governorships in Ken¬ 
tucky and Mississippi. Houston 
Mayor Kathy Whitmire won re- 


election to a fourth term. Incum¬ 
bent mayors were re-elected in 
Philadelphia, Boston, and In¬ 
dianapolis. In New York City, 
Bronx District Attorney Mario 
Merola, who died over a month 
ago of a heart attact, was over¬ 
whelmingly re-elected. • 


BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5. 1987 PAGE 13 






















THEN DECIDE. 


There were many happy faces at Agnos' campaign headquarters election night as returns came 
in showing Agnos in the lead, but it wasn't quite enough to ensure victory outright 

(Photo: S. Savage) 


merit of the electorate that was 
unmoved by any of the can¬ 
didates,” he said. “There wasn’t 
a real galvanizing activity by any 
of the candidates that spurred 
these lackadaisical voters to the 
polls.” He said his surveys in¬ 
dicated that many voters may stay 
home Dec. 8, placing a high 
premium on candidate-spon¬ 
sored get-out-the-vote drives. 

Gay votes poured out in large 
numbers in support of district 
election of supervisors, piling up 
a favorable margin of 66 percent 
to 34 percent. 

On the downtown ballpark, gay 
votes followed the citywide trend, 
rejecting the measure by 59 per¬ 
cent to 41 percent. 

NEW MOLINARI TEAM 

The outcome was a stunning 
recovery for the liberal assembly- 
man from the city’s east side. 
This summer most pundits were 
writing his political obituary 
after it was revealed that Agnos 
had failed to pay tax on lucrative 
land speculation deals brokered 
by his financial angel, Angelo 
Tsakopolous. 

But after months of lagging in 
the polls, Agnos rallied in the 
weeks before the vote. “The Ag¬ 
nos campaign had what it takes 
to win a campaign in this town,” 
said Mayor Dianne Feinstein. 
She pointed to his positive cam¬ 
paign themes and network of 
community-based organizers as 
key to his first-place finish. 

Molinari has been criticized 
for negative mailers attacking his 
rivals, and for failing to project a 
positive message about his ac¬ 
complishments and future plans. 
He is preparing for the run-off by 
cleaning house and bringing in 
a new team. Ousted from his cam¬ 
paign are manager Ron Smith 
and direct mail specialist Rich 
Schlackman. They will be replac¬ 
ed by Jack Davis, top aide to state 
Sen. Quentin Kopp, and Dick 
Pabich. 

Molinari reportedly will also 
move his headquarters to west of 
Twin Peaks, gearing up for a high 
stakes battle for the conservative 
vote. 

Molinari may owe his spot in 
the December election in part to 
gadfly candidate Warren Hin- 
ckle, who pulled down nearly 3 
percent of the vote. Binder’s data 
indicates that most of Hinckle’s 
supporters would have gone to 
Agnos, depriving him of the 50 
percent win he needed to avoid 
the run off. • 

Also contributing to this 
report was Brian Jones, at 
the Molinari campaign. 


Election 

(Continued from page 1) 

direction was in order. Through¬ 
out the evening, there was a 
palpable fear that Molinari 
wouldn’t make the runoff— 
despite his long-time status as 
the front runner. 

Said one gay community 
leader who is working for Moli¬ 
nari, “The negative campaign 
strategy was a big factor” in 
Molinari’s poor showing. “One 
of his strengths is that John Moli¬ 
nari is such a nice guy, but that 
sure didn’t come across.” 

Said another gay Molinari 
operative, “There was an awful 
lot of complacency in this cam¬ 
paign.” 

Ben Gardiner, an activist with 
the Stonewall Democratic Club 
and a Molinari supporter, said 
that gay people who worked for 
Agnos were more organized. 


enthusiastic—and effective— 
than the gay politicos who 
stumped for Molinari. 

“You had Jack Molinari out 
front for three years, and then Ag¬ 
nos came out of nowhere, with 
the Harvey Milk Club army 
beating the pavement for him all 
the way. You have to give them 
credit, they got the [Agnos] vote 
out,” Gardiner said. 

In other ballot contests, pro¬ 
positions calling for the district 
election of supervisors and con¬ 
struction of a downtown ballpark 
were rejected by city votes. 

GAY VOTE TO AGNOS 

Agnos, who ran strongly in all 
sections of the city, fared espe¬ 
cially well among gay and lesbian 
voters. A survey of 35 precincts 
(out of 711 in the city) with either 
large concentrations of gay resi¬ 
dents, or a history of piling up 
large margins for gay candidates, 
showed Agnos outpolling Moli¬ 


nari by 63.1 percent to 22.7 per¬ 
cent. The remainder split among 
other candidates with 8.7 percent 
going to Boas and 5.5 percent to 
minor candidates. 

The districts surveyed are 
located in the Castro, Duboce 
Triangle, Corona-Buena Vista, 
Hayes Valley, Northern Mission, 
Twin Peaks and Noe Valley. 

Independent pollster David 
Binder, who developed the data, 
said, “The results show there is 
still a strong liberal ideology 
among gays and lesbians. Even 
though John Molinari is a strong 
friend of the community, when 
paired against another friend, 
issues made the difference.” 

Binder said he thought that 
Agnos’ support for vacancy con¬ 
trol and opposition to the home- 
porting of the USS Missouri ac¬ 
counted in part for his strong 
showing. 

Binder also noted that it was 
likely that similar trends among 
gay voters continued in more in¬ 
tegrated precincts where a gay- 
identified vote is more diluted. 


Agnos supporter Pat Norman 
said “the gay and lesbian com¬ 
munity made a tremendous state¬ 
ment in terms of the integrity 
they want to see in the leadership 
of this city.” Noting that gay con¬ 
cerns include a broad range of 
city issues, Norman observed 
that the favorable response to Ag¬ 
nos came from a realization that 
“the issues for our community 
are not limited to sexual orienta¬ 
tion.” 

Turn-out fell short of official 
projections. Election day ballots 
cast totalled 188,850. Earlier Jay 
Paterson, Registrar of Voters, had 
predicted the total would go well 
over 200,000. 

According to Binder, the per¬ 
centage of gay voters ran about 
10 percent higher than the 
citywide average. But he said gay 
turn-out still fell short of the 
margin that came to the polls 
during Harry Britt’s congres¬ 
sional campaign earlier this year. 

Binder observed that some in¬ 
difference among voters was 
discernible. “There was a seg- 


SHOULD TOU TAKE THE 

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Going to the polls in Noe Valley (Photo; S. Savage) 


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provided 
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call 621-4858 


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People who test positive show in¬ 
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When testing is not strictly confi¬ 
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discrimination. 


For more information about AIDS 
Antibody Testing, call the San 
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Hotline at 863-AIDS 

Toll-free m Northern CA: (800) FOR-AIDS 
TDD: (415) 864-6606 


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BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 14 





























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BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 15 

































Food for the Soul 

Throwing Dinner Parties, Not Tantrums 
In the Face of the Fear of Dying 

by Mary Richards 

y friend Roxie has the recipe for curing the health crisis blues: Throw food at it. 
Mix a group of people with AIDS and ARC, a group of friends and volunteers, com¬ 
bine with a few great casseroles, an enormous tossed salad, a pinch of punch and 
a dash of wine—then top off with a bunch of colorful balloons—and you’re ready to serve. 




Rod barbeques for people with AIDS and their friends (Photo: Photo Graphics/Darlene) 



The recipe was cooked up by a 
friend of mine who is known not 
only for his nickname, “Roxie,” 
but also for his fun-loving and op¬ 
timistic approach to life. He and 
his lover, Tom, host the dinner 
parties once a month in their 
home. 


Victor Rodriguez, also called 
“Roxie” or “Rod,” remembered 
Thanksgiving dinner last year, 
which was attended by some 
friends who had AIDS, and their 
escorts. 

“At that time I was trying to 
find a way I could help and reach 


out to people with AIDS and I 
really didn’t know how,” he said. 
“The people who were at our 
home that day were sitting enjoy¬ 
ing themselves and releasing 
their emotions in talking—and it 
was all over the dinner table. The 
lovers and friends were discuss¬ 


ing their problems among them¬ 
selves, and it was just a very relax¬ 
ed atmosphere. When it was over 
I said to Tom, T’ve found the clue 
as to what we can do to help.’ And 
that’s how these monthly get- 
togethers started.” 

“I wanted it to be in a social at¬ 
mosphere, not a structured atmo¬ 
sphere,” Rod said. “I wanted it to 
be where people could be relax¬ 
ed, and the best way for people to 
be that way is to have good food, 
good drinks and healthy conver¬ 
sation.” 

The first dinner party was on 
St. Valentine’s Day, 1987 and 
gave Victor and Tom the impetus 
to have a theme for the monthly 
get-togethers. That day the 
balloons were red and white. On 
the Saturday before the Gay 
Freedom Day Parade, rainbow 
flags adorned each table in their 
home, and last month black and 
orange were the colors celebrat¬ 
ing Halloween. 


J erry Gutierrez and his lover 
Doug Golden have been 
coming to the parties since 
they began. Doug has AIDS and 
was too ill to attend last month, 
but Jerry expressed how impor¬ 
tant it is to him. 

“Doug enjoys these parties 
every time he comes,” Jerry said. 
“He’s a very shy, quiet person 
and he has just never seen how 
many people really cared. These 
parties show him that people do 
care—people do love each other. 
They’re like family parties. Even 
though we may not know each 
other very well, everybody is very 
close—you know, it’s hugs and 
kisses and how are you.” 

“I think it gives people with 
AIDS more strength to want to 
continue. Doug didn’t want to go 
out before, not even to have din¬ 
ner with me. But coming to the 
parties has changed him totally. 
He doesn’t want to stay home 
when the party comes around.” 

To bring a change of pace and 
some new energy to the kitchen 
klatches. Rod and Tom have 
reached out to friends whose 
homes they might use as an alter¬ 
native to their apartment. For 
Halloween they arranged an old- 
fashioned hamburger and hot 
dog cookout at the home of a 
Shanti volunteer. 

It had rained all week, but Sat¬ 
urday’s sun beamed through the 
garden as people with AIDS and 
friends enjoyed the fresh air of 
one of the last warm days of In¬ 
dian summer. 


R oman Keene, who was a 
volunteer coordinator for 
Coming Home Hospice, 
agreed to be interviewed as he 
lounged in the outdoor hottub. 

“I remember Rod telling me 
that one of the reasons he had the 
party was because a lot of people 
with AIDS feel they’re being 
neglected and not loved, and 
some are even being ostracized 
by their own community,” he 
said. 

“When the first party was 
given, there were a lot of people 
there, straight and gay, AIDS and 
non-AIDS, and it was a very nice 
environment to be in. I’ve 
brought several of my own friends 
who were just newly diagnosed 
and they really liked it. Initially 
they were very, very scared and 
thought that everybody was go¬ 
ing to be talking about the latest 
lesions they had—and it was 
nothing of that nature—every¬ 
body was just having a good 
time,” Roman said. 

Tom Moore has AIDS, and fre¬ 
quently finds it difficult to be 
motivated. “I don’t know if you 
know this,” he said, “but most 
AIDS people don’t really get out 


very much—we’re pretty home- 
bound. That’s my situation. I 
have to make the effort to get out 
and I do try, but it’s hard some¬ 
times.” 

“Visiting the hospital is not 
the most fun thing to do, but a lot 
of my activity now is going to visit 
friends who are hospitalized. So 
I think it’s wonderful to be able 
to have this party-like atmo¬ 
sphere. We don’t know how many 
parties we will be able to attend. 
And it’s important to have as 
many good times in the last times 
of our lives, which it probably will 
be,” Tom said. 

S ix-month-old Nicholas and 
his mother, Rita Rockett, 
have attended almost every 
get-together. Although Rita was 
there, Nicholas missed the one 
the day before he was born, but 
has managed to brighten up the 
festivities since then. 

“I’ve known Rod for ten 
years,” Rita said, “and we’re so 
busy that we hardly ever see each 
other. Now, at least once a month 
we can get together, and that’s 
important to me.” 

Rita and Rod agree about the 
significance of serving food as a 
statement of life and vitality. 
“When you have food, you have 
friends,” Rita said. “If you want 
to pull something together, you 
do it with food. Whenever any¬ 
thing was wrong in the old days, 
you would always take food— 
whenever somebody had a baby, 
their house burned down, or 
whatever. And that custom is still 
appropriate for now, especially 
with this disease where nourish¬ 
ment is so important.” 

“People are motivated to eat if 
they’re not by themselves. That’s 
one of the hard things about this 
disease, being alone. No one 
wants to be by yourself, especial¬ 
ly if you’re sick,” Rita said. 

Rita comes in contact with 
many people who want to help 
during this crisis, but don’t know 
how. She has some advice for 
them: “People are always saying 
to me, T want to do something.’ 
Well, here’s something that you 
can do: some people cook, maybe 
some people can’t cook but they 
have a big house where you could 
have a party. Take what Rod does 
and do it in your home, maybe 
not on a regular basis, but try it 
and see what happens. And if you 
say you can’t afford it, have four 
or five people do a potluck. You 
don’t have to do the whole thing 
by yourself.” 


I t is Rod’s lover, Tom Ritzen- 
thaler, who shares in the or¬ 
ganization of the events. “At 
first I thought the idea of the par¬ 
ty was a little frivolous,” Tom 
says, “but we both wanted to do 
something and he talked me into 
it. He talks me into everything 
anyway. 

“It’s a little bit of work, but it 
isn’t that hard. We just divide 
everything up. Victor cleans the 
house, thank God, because I hate 
to clean the house. I make the 
salads and I always make the 
chili, because I make good chili.” 

Rod became a member of the 
Price Club in order to cut down 
on costs for bulk items, and, Tom 
said, “people give us donations 
of $10 or $20 and that always 
helps.” 

The parties are a success, and 
one of the best things about 
them — in Rod’s opinion—is 
“that many people with AIDS 
have met new friends and have 
reached out for each other. I 
know of two or three real relation¬ 
ships that have worked out of 
this, which is beautiful and which 
proves that we still have the desire 
to want to go on.” • 


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BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5. 1987 PAGE 16 

















Sen. Albert Gore 


Tennessee's Presidential Hopeful 
Gets Specific About Gay Issues 

by Ted Reitz 


EDITOR 'S NOTE: Ted Reitz is chair of the bylaws commit¬ 
tee for the Alice B. Toklas Democratic Club and was active in 
the 1984 California campaign of Democratic presidential can¬ 
didate Gary Hart. He spoke with Sen. Albert Gore, Jr.—a 
leading Democratic candidate for president in 1988—about 
his views on gay-related issues. 


I n his hotel room at the San Francisco Sheraton Palace, A1 
Gore was packing his things to check out for L. A., where 
he would be visiting an AIDS hospice the next day. Busy 
and running a little late, the Democratic candidate for Presi¬ 
dent had invited me to his room for an interview following his 
public press conference last week. 


The senator from Tennessee 
had just delivered an economic 
policy speech to the Common¬ 
wealth Club. The Grand Ball¬ 
room luncheon crowd appeared 
to react favorably to the presiden¬ 
tial candidate’s youth and vision 
—but now was the time for clear 
answers to some tough questions. 


<1 


, Are you going to focus 
' on AIDS facts and in- 
^ formation or on peo¬ 
ple’s reaction to what the dis¬ 
ease is? 


A There is much America 
can do to meet the chal¬ 
lenge of AIDS. I believe 
immediate action is warranted in 
five areas: research for a vaccine 
and cure; public education; test¬ 
ing; international cooperation; 
and financing care for those with 
AIDS. We should launch a Man- 
hattan-style project to speed the 
finding of a cure and a vaccine. 
We should also begin a massive 
program of public education 
about how to avoid the disease. 


AIDS is no doubt a major prob¬ 
lem, but it is not something we 
need to fear irrationally. A nation 
as enlightened as ours should not 
be forced to live in the darkness 
this administration has allowed 
to grow around AIDS. 


Q Wliat level of funding 
would you promote to 
develop and imple¬ 
ment your concept of a 
’'Manhattan Project-type’* 
endeavor to solve the AIDS 


A I would immediately con¬ 
vene a Presidential Con¬ 
ference of the best author¬ 
ities in science and medicine to 
seek recommendations on the 
maximum amounts of research 
that could reasonably accelerate 
finding a cure. The saving of lives 
should be our first objective. 


Q Both Sen. Paul Simon 
and Rev. Jesse Jack- 
son have publicly en¬ 
dorsed the pending congres¬ 
sional legislation to extend 
federal civil rights protec¬ 
tion to gay and lesbian peo¬ 
ple. How do you feel? 


A Discrimination on the 
basis of sexual preference 
should be prohibited. I 
favor protection of civil rights of 
those discriminated against on 
the basis of sexuality although I 
do not support affirmative action 
as a remedy for discrimination on 
the basis of sexual orientation. 
Affirmative action really isn’t in 
the best interests of anyone. 



'A nation as enlightened 
as our should not be forced 
to live in the darkness this 
administration has allowed 
to grow around AIDS.' 

—A! Gore 


% 


I Sen. Jesse Helms has 
' called for withholding 
' the entire budget for 
fistrict of Columbia (F Y 
‘88| unless the City Council 
repeals an ordinance ban¬ 
ning AIDS discrimination in 
insurance. How did we vote? 
(District of Columbia legis¬ 
lation is subject to Congres¬ 
sional review within 30 days 
of adoption of municipal or¬ 
dinances.) 


A I voted against the latest 
Helms amendment. [Gore 
supported last year’s 
Helms-Dannemeyer bill on the 
D.C. anti-bias ordinance, how¬ 
ever.] During last year’s review of 
the Washington D.C. law, the 
issue was different: whether or 
not the Senate should instruct 
the District of Columbia to go 
back and rethink the part of the 
ordinance that prohibited AIDS 
testing for life insurance. My 
opposition was on the basis that 
for most life insurance, the policy 
of medical underwriting is stan¬ 
dard, where invariably people are 
checked based upon the actuar¬ 
ial risk of dying young or old, and 
that basis should not be changed 
in the case of AIDS. 


Health and disability in¬ 
surance, on the other hand, is 
written differently. Insurers 


should not test for AIDS or dis¬ 
criminate on the basis of a 
positive test for AIDS when ap¬ 
plied to health and disability in¬ 
surance. Here, I am opposed to 
the “medical underwriting’’ 
policy of insurance companies, 
because my national health 
policy says all Americans should 
have health insurance. 

I am an original co-sponsor of 
the “AIDS Federal Policy Act’’ 
which, if enacted, would make it 
a crime to discriminate (against 
people with AIDS). 

Q So, your position on 
the Washington D.C. 
anti-discrimination 
ordinance has changed? 

A No, this time the issue was 
entirely different. The 
time allotted the Senate 
for review of D.C.’s ordinances 
had long since expired. Now, the 
issue was whether or not the Sen¬ 
ate was going to reach in and 
strike down a law already in ef¬ 
fect. I opposed that. 

[The bill, introduced by Sen. 
Helms Sept. 30, would have 
repealed the capital’s ordinance 
prohibiting insurers from testing 
for HIV as part of life, health and 
disability insurance, and pro¬ 
hibits insurers from refusing 
polities to those who have tested 


positive for HIV. Since the law 
was enacted in May 1986, most 
major insurance carriers have 
reportedly stopped offering life 
and health policies in D.C.] 


Q You mentioned test¬ 
ing as part of your 
AIDS program. Do 
you plan to camouflage the 
AIDS issue in testing legisla¬ 
tion, or get on to the main 
points of education and fin¬ 
ding a cure? 


A The first step of any 
testing policy must be to 
enact legislation with 
strong confidentiality and anti- 
discrimination provisions. Sim¬ 
ply, voluntary testing should be 
available to everyone, but also, 
testing is a means to an end. The 
question is not whether to test, 
but for what results. 


Q Do you support the 
appointment of addi¬ 
tional qualified gay 
representatives to the Presi¬ 
dential AIDS Commission? 

A Yes, absolutely. It’s 
disgraceful that the Pres¬ 
ident hasn’t done more. 
Not since Herbert Hoover has a 
President done less when he 
should have known better. • 


A HEALTH WORKBOOK 
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You know the bad news: the spread of AIDS 
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read, to keep and to refer to time and time 
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BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5. 1987 PAGE 17 


































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CONGREGATION SHA'AR ZAHAV and 
METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF SAN FRANCISCO 
invite you to participate in a weekend of spiritual renewal 

"AND YOUR DAUGHTERS SHALL PROPHESY. . 

Friday, November 6th 8:15 p.m. Shabbat Service 
Dr. Naomi Janewitz, professor of religious studies at UC Davis 
at Congregation Sha'ar Zahav (Danvers at Caselli) 

Saturday, November 7th 7:30 p.m. 

"An Evening with Adrienne Rich" 
professor of English and Women's Studies at Stanford 
Advance tickets required for this event only 
donation of $5-10 requested: 863-4434 for tickets 
celebration will take place at MCC, 150 Eureka Street 
featuring the debut of the CSZ/MCCSF Chorus 

Sunday, November 8th 10:30 a.m. Morning Worship 
The Rev. Dr. Karen Ziegler, pastor of MCC New York City 
at MCC, 150 Eureka Street (childcare provided) 

For more information, directions, tickets, contact the church 
at 863-4434 or the synagogue at 861-6932. 


HOW LONG 
CAN YOU 
WAIT... 

FOR A “MIRACLE DRUG” 
TO CURE A.LD.S.? 


You can make the choice to stay alive. You can feel 
excellent now. Based on the concept of 
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THE CHOICE! for the prevention of 
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Karen Brodine 

Karen Brodine, 40 year old socialist 
feminist writer, poet, editor and 
organizer, died Oct. 18 at her home in San 
Francisco as a result of metastatic breast 


Brodine was highly respected by fem¬ 
inists, leftists, unionists, lesbians, gays, 
and people of color for her principled 
political activism and poetry. 

Brodine was a widely-recognized poet 
and popular reader whose major works 
include three books of poetry, Slow Jug- 
idling (1975), Workweek (1977), and lUegal 
Assembly (1980). Her fourth book. 
Woman Sitting at the Machine, Thinking, 
will be published at the end of this year. 

Her essays and 
poetry have been 
printed and re¬ 
viewed in major 
national and in¬ 
ternational femi¬ 
nist, gay and rad¬ 
ical publications. 

Born in Seattle 
on June 14,1947, 
Brodine grew up 

_in Woodinville, 

Washington. She moved to the San Fran¬ 
cisco Bay Area in 1968 and graduated in 
dance from UC Berkeley in 1972. She 
taught dance in the Richmond and 
Berkeley school districts, and was part of 
the Moveable Feast Dance Group. 

Public memorial meetings honoring 
Brodine and her myriad of contributions 
will be held in San Francisco and other 
cities across the nation in mid-November. 
The San Francisco meeting will be on 
Sunday, Nov. 15,2 p.m. at Intersection for 
the Arts, 766 Valencia St. 

The Karen Brodine Memorial Fund 
has been established to finance 
publishing Brodine’s writings. Donations 
may be sent in care of Nellie Wong, Valen¬ 
cia Hall, 523-A Valencia Street, San Fran¬ 
cisco, CA 94110. 

For more information, call (415) 
864-1278 or (415) 550-1020. • 

Dirk Sanford Myers 

Dirk Sanford Myers found his peace 
Nov. 1, following several months of 
fighting all that is AIDS. He was made 
comfortable by 





__ was going to gay 

heaven where he would learn everyone’s 
secrets and where his questions would be 
answered. 

Dirk leaves his lover Bill Beiersdorfer, 
parents Anna Louise and Jim Myers, 
sister Kathy, brother-in-law Frank and 
nephews John and Alan. 

He’s free! 

Contributions can be made in Dirk’s 
name to VNA Hospice. • 

Michael Rene Maginnis 

My Sweeter. You died like you lived— 
with love, dignity, compassion, humor, 
and your own unerring good taste. For 15 
years our lives intertwined, your essence 
permeated my every cell, your love 
became my anchor, your encouragement 
my beacon. 


For so long my 
Iheart ached to 
I see your gentle 
I spirit set free 
I from your body’s 
pain. Now my 
heart breaks to 
find you gone 
from my kiss, my 
[ embrace, my bed 
I and my life. 

With a twist of 
your own humor you chose to leave on 
your favorite holiday—Halloween. We 
gave out your chocolates and then we 
dressed up in your favorite things. Only 
you could have choreographed this Irish 
wake. 

Goodbye “Sweeter, Little Janie, Quali¬ 
ty Control, Billy Butch Guy, Francine 
Fern Guy, Lighten up, Mary...’’ Now the 
angels sing your praise. 

Please join his family and friends on 
Saturday Nov. 7 for a memorial (11 a.m.) 
and dinner (2 p.m.) at Mission San Jose 
Chapel, 433{X) Mission Blvd., Fremont. • 

Robert Zeilinger 

Robert Zeilinger, born Sept. 8, 1953, 
passed on peacefully Aug. 10, in the 
presence of his devoted parents, after 
nearly two years of battling AIDS. 

Robert was a native of York, Nebraska 
and settled in San Francisco in the late 
1970s. A graduate of the University of 
Nebraska in classics, his love in life was 
creating chamber music and playing the 
clarinet. A charter member of the San 
Francisco Gay Freedom Day Marching 
Band under founding conductor Jon 
Sims, Robert carried on the legacy that 
making music with your friends is one of 
the finest ways that people can experience 
togetherness. 

He will be remembered for his cheer¬ 
ful and sometimes blatantly honest ap¬ 
proach to life, music, friends and family. 

He is survived by his mother, Hilda 
Zeilinger, his father, John Zeilinger and 
family in Nebraska. All who knew him will 
greatly miss his wit and insight. • 


Gary Nelson 

Gary M. Nelson, 43, died Oct. 7, after 
living with AIDS for fifteen months. Gary 
was known and respected for his work at 
the Oakland Public Library and as a 
technical editor most recently with the 
U.S. Forest Service in Berkeley. 

The last several 
I years he devoted 
; his energies to 
weaving, produc¬ 
ing and selling 
exceptional work. 

His special 
ways, his warm 
smile and his 
laughter will be 
missed by those 
‘ who knew and 
loved him—his family, those he worked 
with and his many friends in the East Bay 
and San Francisco, especially South of 
Market. 

A gathering of friends will be held in 
Oakland Nov. 15. Please call 536-8733 for 
further information. Donations should be 
made to the San Francisco AIDS Foun¬ 
dation in his memory. • 


Randall Clarke 

A 13-month struggle with AIDS end¬ 
ed Oct. 23 when the Lord peacefully call¬ 
ed Randy home as he slept. 




During the seven years of his residence 
Randy, 35, was a waiter in San Francisco. 
He was well liked by his co-workers and 
clients and loved by his employers. He, 
too, loved them greatly. 

Leaving no bar unvisited and making 
many friends, Randy took seriously his 
“civic duty’’ to promote and maintain 
San Francisco’s reputation as a “party 
I town.’’ Whether 
I one of his spon- 
I taneous Broad- 
I way musical ren¬ 
ditions or as a 
true “whirling- 
dervish” at Tro- 
cadero, all who 
knew him delight- 
I ed in sharing 
I Randy’s greatest 
I love: Dancing. 

The examples of bravery, courage, 
kindness and love with which Randy both 
lived and died shall serve and sustain, 
through the many challenges of their own 
lives, all those left behind who loved him. 

Randy’s mother Gloria, and his 
brothers, Rick and Dan, loved him greatly 
and were well loved by him. 

Ever at his side and thinking it an 
honor, his devoted lover Ron shared with 
Randy a love so deep it served to bestow 
dignity upon all gay people. 

Farewell, great heart. God shall reunite 
us soon. • 

Robert Ward 

On Oct. 5, Robert (Bob) Ward died of 
AIDS after a 15 month illness. As a devout 
Catholic, he passed away two-and-a-half 
weeks after meeting with the pope at Mis¬ 
sion Dolores, ful¬ 
filling one of his 
final wishes. 



Hospital and clinic staff and Visiting 
Nurses Association and Shanti Project. 
Donations in his memory may be made 
to Coming Home Hospice. Mass was held 
at St. Dominic’s Oct. 7, and a gathering 
of friends at his home after the service. • 

Marvin C. Murray 

After a year’s 
courageous bat¬ 
tle with AIDS, 
Marvin left us 
Oct. 23. 

Marvin leaves 
behind his lover 
friend and partner 
in business Jedd 
Jedlick. He leaves 
a host of friends 
with treasured 
memories of time spent with him. • 

Obituary Policy 

Due to an unfortunately large 
number of obituaries, Bay Area 
Reporter has been forced to 
change its obituary policy. 

We must now restrict obits to 
200 words. And please, no poetry. 
We reserve the right to edit for 
style, clarity and taste. 



Monthly, through the pages of S.A.F.E. NETWORK, 
you’ll find possible CURES that are available, 
inexpensive and safe. Reports of the surprising 
benefits from products used to protect your system 
from A.LD.S. 


Take charge of your own HELP YOURSELF- 
health and well being HELP YOUR 
SUBSCRIBE TODAY. FRIENDS! 


SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY RATES THRU 11/30/87 


□ 3 Issue trial subscription. $12.(X) 

□ 6 Issues for $22.00. Regularly $25.00 

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NAME _ 

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Send check or money order to S.A.F.E. 

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Publication of 

S.A.F.E. NETWORK 
NEWSLETTER GROUP 



STAYING 
ALIVE & 
FEELING 
EXCELLENT 


AIDS and Minorities Legal Forum 


Art Exhibit Benefits 
Arts Project 

The Aris Project cordially in¬ 
vites you to a benefit reception to 
preview a unique art exhibition, 
Friday, Nov. 6, 7 p.m. until 
10 p.m. 

Look at Me! is a multi-media 
presentation of visual art focus¬ 
ing on AIDS imagery and expres¬ 
sions of the human experience 
surrounding AIDS. 

Presented at WORKS/San 
Jose, 66 South First Street, dona¬ 
tions are $20 per person in ad¬ 
vance or at the door. The pro¬ 
gram will benefit the Aris Pro¬ 
ject, a nonprofit agency pro¬ 
viding support services to people 
with AIDS and their loved ones. 


The AIDS epidemic has taken 
a disproportionately high toll 
upon ethnic minority communi¬ 
ties. Of the over 40,000 persons 
with AIDS in the United States, 
25 percent are Black, 14 percent 
are Latino, and 2 percent are 
Asian, Native American, and 
other ethnic minorities. 

Among women with AIDS, 
Blacks and Latinos account for 76 
percent of the cases. Among 
children with AIDS, Blacks and 
Latinos account for over 80 per¬ 
cent of the cases. And among in¬ 
mates in correctional facilities. 
Blacks and Latinos account for 
over 80 percent of the cases. 

In an effort to expand the 
availability of AIDS related legal 
services to minority communities, 
the San Francisco Human Rights 
Commission, San Francisco Bay 


Association, National Lawyers 
Guild, Bayview-Hunter’s Point 
Foundation, Bay Area Lawyers for 
Individual Rights, and others, are 
sponsoring an AIDS and Minori¬ 
ties Legal Forum. This forum will 
provide both general and techni¬ 
cal information to minority at¬ 
torneys and legal service pro¬ 
viders on the legal issues raised by 
AIDS, with particular emphasis 
on the impact of AIDS on minor¬ 
ity communities. 

It will be held Nov. 14,9 a.m. to 
5 p.m., at the Bar Association of 
San Francisco, 685 Market Street. 

This event is free and open to 
the public. Due to space limita¬ 
tions, attendance will be limited 
to the first 150 people who regis¬ 
ter. For additional information, 
contact Norman Nickens, 558- 
4901 or Janet Seldon, 764-1600. • 


BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 18 


































AZT 


(Continued from page 1) 

Department of Health and 
Human Services. 

CONFLICT OF INTEREST 

Graff said, “It’s an inference 
we’ve drawn at this point” from 
the letters between the agencies 
and Burroughs Wellcome. 

He said he believed that if the 
lawsuit is pursued, further evi¬ 
dence will be found. “We’re put¬ 
ting together the pieces of the 
puzzle,” said Graff. 

Broder’s action, he said, “vio¬ 
lates conflict of interest as set out 
in an executive order” issued by 
Pres. Lyndon B. Johnson in 1%5. 
At the very least, it “indicates a 
cozy relationship,” he said, be¬ 
tween the agencies and the drug 
firm. 

In a February 1985 letter from 
Broder to Dr. Sandra N. Lehr- 
man, a researcher at Burroughs 
Wellcome, Broder indicated a 
great deal of interchange be¬ 
tween his office and the commer¬ 
cial firm. He mentions a suramin 
study and studies on AZT—then 
called “compound S.” 

Broder discussed at length the 
proposal that Burroughs fund 
three research fellowships at 
NCI, each at $17,000 plus bene¬ 
fits. 

A follow-up letter in May from 
Broder’s administrative assistant 
states the procedure for the com¬ 


pany to use in making its dona¬ 
tion. The letter states that Bur¬ 
roughs should specify that “the 
research is of mutual benefit to 
both your organization and to the 
National Cancer Institute and 
that as a result of this collabora¬ 
tion, your organization will not 
derive profit, neither tangible or 
intangible.” 

One month later in June, Bur¬ 
roughs Wellcome applied to the 
FDA’s Orphan Drug Products 
Development office. The com¬ 
pany requested the special status 
for its program developing AZT 
to treat AIDS and ARC. 

$55,000 CHECK 

On July 17, Broder’s office 
received the $55,000 check from 
Burroughs Wellcome. The check 
was made out to the Foundation 
for the Advancement of Educa¬ 
tion in the Sciences instead of to 
NCI. 

That same day, Stephen B. 
Fredd, acting director of the 
FDA’s orphan drug program, 
granted Burroughs Wellcome or¬ 
phan drug status to its AZT pro¬ 
gram. Orphan drugs are those for 
use in treating special or rare 
medical problems. 

Broder and other NIH officials 
declined to comment on the law¬ 
suit or the relationship between 
the government agencies and the 
pharmaceuticals company. 

But according to the Washing¬ 
ton Blade, a gay newspaper, 
Broder called it “standard prac¬ 
tice” for manufacturers to “help 
underwrite” federal research. 


Lesbian Politics Conf. Set for November 


The Lesbian Agenda for Ac¬ 
tion (LAFA) will conduct the first 
Bay Area political conference to 
address issues directly affecting 
lesbians on Saturday, Nov. 14, 
and Sunday, Nov. 15, at Mission 
High School, 3750 18th Street at 
Dolores in San Francisco. Satur¬ 
day’s keynote speaker, attorney 
Donna Hitchens, will speak on 
The Process of Discrimination. 
On Sunday, political activists Pat 
Norman will discuss Tool for Po¬ 
litical Change. 

Author/professor Sally Gear¬ 
hart will serve as mistress of 
ceremonies for the entire con¬ 
ference which is expected to at¬ 
tract over 500 area lesbians. Each 
keynote speaker will facilitate a 
plenary panel discussion follow¬ 
ing her presentation. 

Among Saturday’s invited 
panelists are Roberta 
Achtenberg, Virginia Harris and 
Carole Migden and on Sunday, 
Marv Dunlap, Roma Guy and Del 


Martin. The conference will fea¬ 
ture fifteen issues workshops and 

five strategy sessions during the 
two days. Advance registration for 
the Lesbian Agenda for Action 
conference is $25, and $30 at the 
door. No one will be turned away 
for lack of funds. 

To encourage the participation 
of all women, LAFA will be pro¬ 
viding childcare throughout the 
conference but advance reserva¬ 
tion through registration is re¬ 
quired. The entire conference 
site is wheelchair accessible. Vol¬ 
unteers for the conference are 
needed and invited to contact the 
LAFA office. LAFA also en¬ 
courages tax-deductible con¬ 
tributions. 

Advance registration forms are 
available at the San Francisco 
Women’s Building, 3543 - 18th 
Street (at Valencia) in San Fran¬ 
cisco, or may be obtained by call¬ 
ing the Lesbian Agenda for Ac¬ 
tion Conference at (415)552-5677. 


Broder said that Burroughs 
Wellcome’s contribution cleared 
all the proper channels for such 
donations, including any ques¬ 
tion of conflict of interest. He 
said that his work had nothing to 
do with FDA’s approval process 
for drug uses. 

POOR RESULTS 

Burroughs Wellcome and AZT 
have come under scrutiny recent¬ 
ly from a number of directions. 
Questions have been raised about 
the high cost of the drug. And its 
long-term value in halting the de¬ 
velopment of AIDS has been 
questioned by a new study at the 
University of Miami. 

A Sept. 15 story in the Wash¬ 
ington Post asked why, after gov¬ 
ernment scientists pioneered 
research in AZT, the drug was 
handed over to a commercial 
firm. The Post reported that 
some government officials ques¬ 
tioned Burroughs Wellcome’s 
figure of $80 million the com¬ 
pany says it invested in AZT and 
is entitled to recoup. 

Meanwhile, the Los Angeles 
Times reported recently that 
AZT seems to benefit recipients 
in the first six months of use, but 
after that the drug seems to have 
less ability to halt the disease. 

According to a University of 
Miami study of 60 AZT reci¬ 
pients, most gained weight and 
improved their T-4 helper blood 
cell count early on. After 6 to 14 
months, however, most showed 
weight loss and a drop in the 
number of T4 blood cells. Some 
also had to discontinue the ther¬ 
apy because of serious side ef¬ 
fects. 

According to the Post, the com¬ 
pany has actually invested only 
about $30 million in AZT. The 
other $50 million is an estimate 
of what the firm expects to spend 
the first year AZT is on the mar¬ 
ket. The $7,000-10,000 cost per 
patient is generally seen as an ar¬ 
bitrarily arrived at figure based 
on questionable sources. • 



ST. FRANCIS LUTHERAN CHURCH 

invites you to 

Sunday Worship at 11:00 A.M. 

152 Church Street, near Market 





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Volunteers needed. Call 
today for more information. 

777-CARE 



SHANTI 

PROJECT 


BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 19 











































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Soler Fired 

(Continued from page 1) 

That rights panel’s opposition 
to the Missouri prompted a 
steady stream of criticism from 
City Hall. The abrupt firing of 
Soler fuels speculation that the 
lame-duck mayor is engaging in 
a last minute vendetta against 
Missouri opponents. 

Human Rights Commissioner 
Phyllis Lyon called upon the 
mayor to reinstate Soler, but that 
request was rebuffed, and Lyon 
quit the commission in protest. 

Soler had just completed her 
second four-year term in Septem¬ 
ber. Since she had been elected 
by her colleagues to lead the' 
15-member body until the end of 
the year, her reappointment was 
considered to be routine. 

But last week Soler was noti¬ 
fied by deputy mayor Hadley Roff 
that the mayor had balked at 
keeping the independent com¬ 
missioner in office, and was 
replacing her with former Hous¬ 
ing Commissioner Joan Sanjule. 
Three other rights commis¬ 
sioners whose terms had also ex¬ 
pired were reappointed by Fein- 
stein. 

Soler called her termination 
“untimely,” noting that only two 
more commission meetings were 
scheduled until the end of the 
year. At that time the new mayor 
will ask all city commissioners to 
resign, opening the door to new 
appointments compatible with 
the changing of the guard at City 
Hail. 

UNCALLED-FOR' 

Human Rights Commissioner 
Sal Roselli said Soler’s perform¬ 
ance “was extraordinary” and 
observed that the decision not to 
reappoint Soler was motivated by 


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Phyllis Lyon 


(Photo: Rink) 


political considerations “that 
were brought to a head by the 
Missouri.” 

Lyon also linked the Soler deci¬ 
sion to the Missouri, and called 
the mayor’s decision “an un¬ 
called-for action.” 

Roff, a key advisor on mayoral 
appointments, dismissed the flap 
over Soler’s dismissal. He said 
Feinstein prefers turnover in 
commission appointments and 
said, “The mayor has made it 
clear that two terms are the 
limit.” 

But when pressed further, Roff 
conceded, “There has been some 
concern that Esta had not kept 
this office informed of things that 
might be of concern.” 

Lyon, a 12-year veteran of the 
commission, first appointed by 
Mayor Moscone, disputed Roffs 
assertion of a two-term rule. She 
said, “That hasn’t been the case 
with the Human Rights Commis¬ 
sion. Several of the other com¬ 
missioners have served as long as 
me.” 

Commission staff members 
agreed that commission mem¬ 
bership was stable, and could not 
recall other similar instances in 
which reappointments had been 
withheld. 

FEINSTEIN MIFFED 

Lyon said that Feinstein had 
repeatedly expressed her dis¬ 
pleasure at the commission’s 
handling of bias questions sur¬ 
rounding the homeporting pro¬ 
posal for the Missouri, particu¬ 
larly criticizing the presence of 
the press at the meeting where 
the issue was first raised with 
commissioners. 

But the criticism was mis- 



Sal Rosselli (Photo: Rink) 


directed according to Lyon. The 
commission was obliged to con¬ 
sider the issue, she said, after 
Assemblyman Art Agnos (D-San 
Francisco) formally requested a 
public hearing on the Navy’s hir¬ 
ing practices. It was an aide to 
Agnos who tipped off the press 
that the matter would be con¬ 
sidered. 

After a well-publicized hear¬ 
ing, the commission passed a 
resolution asking the Board of 
Supervisors to ensure that any 
city agreements include a guar¬ 
antee that the Navy and defense 
department would rescind regu¬ 
lations that impede the hiring of 
gay civilian employees. 

Soler said of that decision, “I 
know we took a strong position, 
but not a position stronger than 
other instances of discrimina¬ 
tion.” Soler said the city’s deal 
with the Navy “was not a special 
contract” and that, in the com¬ 
mission’s view, the Navy should 
be forced to conform to the same 
antidiscrimination standard re¬ 
quired of others who do business 
with the city. 

LACKS CLOUT 

She noted that the commission 
was unified on this position, pass¬ 
ing the Missouri resolution with 
only one dissenting vote. 

According to Soler, the Human 
Rights Commission has lacked 
clout and prestige under the 
Feinstein administration, adding 
that appointments to the body 
are viewed as less desirable than 
winning a spot on the boards 
which oversee the police, fire or 
planning departments. 

Said Soler, “I feel (the Human 
Rights Commission) hasn’t been 
given its proper place in the city.” 
Nonetheless, she said, “We were 
doing our job with increasing 
vigor.” Soler expressed hope that 
the next mayor would strengthen 
the role of the commission’s 
watchdog functions. 

Of the Missouri controversy 
and the ensuing strife with the 
mayor, Soler said, “if (the com¬ 
mission) sees discrimination, it 
has to name it. It can’t be com¬ 
promised.” 

Soler has won praise for her 
handling of public hearings 
which first identified instances of 
AIDS discrimination, and many 
credit that work for helping lay a 
foundation for the adoption of 
the city’s AIDS antidiscrimina¬ 
tion law. 

The likely next head of the 
commission is current vice chair¬ 
man George Suncin. Commis¬ 
sion members select their own 
leader. • 


BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 20 





































BAY AREA REPORTER 

GREATER BAY NEWS 


San Mateo Supes OK Concept 
For Health Anti-Bias Ordinance 


lAKB 



PIACE“ 


by Tim Taylor 

An ordinance to ban AIDS discrimination in San Mateo County cleared its first legislative 
hurdle last week. By a unanimous vote, the 5-member Board of Supervisors instructed the 
District Attorney’s office to draft a law that outlaws bias in housing, employment and public 
accommodations. 


Proponents of the measure say 
it is likely that a sweeping coun¬ 
ty law which applies to people 
with AIDS or ARC, and those 
who are HIV antibody positive, 
will be in place by the end of 
December. 

Not yet decided is the penalty 
to be assessed against those who 
violate the measure. Both civil 
and criminal sanctions are under 
consideration, and Board of 
Supervisors President Tom 
Nolan said the bill drafters 
should come back with a pro¬ 
posal “that has teeth.” Nolan is 
the first openly gay supervisor in 
San Mateo County. 

Once the measure is drafted, it 
will return to the board for a pub¬ 
lic hearing and a final vote. Ap¬ 
proval is viewed to be virtually 
certain. 

The effort to adopt a broaden¬ 
ed countywide civil rights law 
occurs against the backdrop of 
rising complaints of AIDS- 
related bias. Although no formal 



Sup. Tom Nolan 

(Photo: Rink) 


accounting exists of the precise 
number of cases, anecdotal infor¬ 
mation indicates approximately 
50 instances of abuse this year, 
according to Margaret Taylor, the 
county director of health ser¬ 
vices. 


TWO MEN FIRED 

The supervisors heard 
testimony from two unidentified 
San Mateo residents, a florist 
and a computer specialist. The 
two said that they lost their jobs 
after their employers learned that 
blood tests indicated they were 
HIV antibody positive. 

Moreover, an elderly couple 
who volunteer in the county’s 
AIDS task force office have been 
shunned by neighbors at the 
senior citizen complex where 
they live because of their ac¬ 
tivities. 

Testifying against the propos¬ 
ed ordinance was the owner of a 
Menlo Park hair salon who said 
he was losing business because 
customers said they were uncom¬ 
fortable in an establishment that 
employed people who appeared 
to be gay. The shop owner ex¬ 
pressed concern that the new law 
would be bad for business. 

The civil-rights measure was 
placed on the agenda of the 
Board of Supervisors at the ini¬ 
tiative of the county health 
department. 

Taylor said there has been 
mounting urgency getting the 
law in place, especially in the 
aftermath of an incident in 
Florida in which a family was 
burned out of its home when 
neighbors learned that two 
hemophiliac children living there 
had been diagnosed with AIDS. 

“My main concern is that peo¬ 
ple not sit back and say what hap¬ 
pened in Florida couldn’t hap¬ 
pen here,” Taylor said. “In fact, 
there are lots of stories of people 
being discriminated against 
right here in San Mateo. It shows 
we shouldn’t be complacent.” 

Taylor said that about 200 peo¬ 
ple have been diagnosed with 
AIDS in San Mateo County, of 
whom 50 to 60 are still living. Of¬ 
ficials estimate between 6,000 
and 7,000 people in the county 
are HIV antibody positive. There 
are no figures on the number of 
ARC cases. 

HOW IT WORKS 

The proposal being drafted in 
the District Attorney’s office will 
establish a mediation system to 
(Continued on next page) 

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To Bring Light’ 

100 Gather for Memorial 

by Marv. Shaw 

Under the beautifuUy restored dome of the rotunda of the 
Old Courthouse in Redwood City, 100 people held a 
commemorative ceremony at dusk Friday, Oct. 30, for those 
who have died of AIDS, those who are currently battling the 
disease, and the individuals and organizations assisting that 
battle. 


For more than a year, the idea 
has been forming in the minds 
and efforts of the county’s PWA’s, 
County AIDS Project Director 
Ed Hilton, Board of Supervisors 
President Tom Nolan, Supervisor 
Anna Eshoo, Director of Health 
Services Margaret Taylor, and 
many others. All of them were 
present and spoke. 

Hilton was master of cere¬ 
monies and explained that the 
program was organized on three 
themes: focus on prevention and 
those as yet uninfected; celebra¬ 
tion of those still with us; and a 
memorial for those who have 
gone before. 

Hilton introduced Nolan as 
the person “who has done more 
for efforts to deal with AIDS than 
anyone else in the county.” Nolan 
declared that the October AIDS 
Awareness Month was an unqual¬ 
ified success, culminating in the 
Board of Supervisors passing an 
antidiscrimination ordinance 
protesting the residency and job 
rights of persons with AIDS. 

Eshoo used the candlelighting 
as a metaphor. “We are here to 
bring light,” she said, referring 
to the justice and education that 


the lawmaker’s efforts and the 
countywide information dispens¬ 
ing in October created. 

Taylor gave thanks to the many 
who have made San Mateo 
County’s AIDS Project “the best 
in California.” 

Along with ELLIPSE Presi¬ 
dent Chris Coppola, volunteers 
Tom Slade, Bill Glenn, and Greg 
Long urged an emphasis on 
living and continued effort. 
Glenn asked each person to reach 
out and touch the persons on 
either side, then said to the 
crowd, “That warmth you feel is 
love, that is what we must feel for 
each other.” Slade and Long are 
PWAs. 

Hilton began the third part of 
the service by intoning, “There 
are people here tonight whom 
you cannot see,” referring to 
those who have died of AIDS— 
but who are being remembered. 

The crowd then walked with 
their candles two blocks to a 
courtyard in the County Govern¬ 
ment Center, where each placed 
a candle in the flower bed around 
James Stoval’s uplifting abstract 
sculpture “Shalom.” • 


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BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 21 



































































Disentangle the Bafflement 


MAGNANIMOUS EMANATION 

(A Clarifying Nose) 

From what I understood to be 
a desire for a low-key participa¬ 
tion, combined with some confu¬ 
sion (and mis-reading) about last 
week’s column, I now find it 
necessary to disentangle the baf¬ 
flement. 

Every Sunday night, the 
Bench & Bar presents a varie¬ 
ty/talent show. Through the ef¬ 
forts of Bobby McManus, the 
staff, and the customers of B&B, 
it was decided that the door 
charges from the shows would be 
donated to East Bay Assistance 
Fund. The first such donation 
was presented to EBAF by Bob¬ 
by, at Little Mother’s auction at 
Town & Country. A second, and 
equal, donation was again pre¬ 
sented to EBAF last week. 

In order to respect an impor¬ 
tunity of modulated cooperation, 
no dollar amount was presented 
in my column. Unfortunately, I 
mentioned the contribution 
along with monies still owed by 
an individual and another bar. 

My apologies for those who 
felted slighted, but I thought I 
was honoring the wishes of those 
connected with Bench & Bar. Let 
it be stated publicly that EBAF 
most sincerely appreciates and 
acknowledges the tireless efforts 
of Bobby McManus, the Bench & 
Bar, and all the customers that 
contributed to the $1,000 dona¬ 
tion to EBAF. People like you 
make the world a nicer place. 

CARVING COMPETITION 

(A Cleaving Nose?) 

The Pumpkin Carving party, 
sponsored by Imperial Star Em¬ 
pire, and held at T&C Sunday, 
Oct. 25, was a study in concentra¬ 
tion, competition, and creativity. 
Over 12 brave souls entered the 
arena of extrication, and were 
given only one hour to produce 
their best effort. 

There was some bit of grum- 



The winner of the pumpkin 'carving' contest 


bling and discomfort about the 
first place winner—of course 
from those who didn’t win. The 
winning pumpkin wasn’t carved 
at all, but rather it was put in 
“face” and attached to a minia¬ 
ture Mae West type body, com¬ 
plete with velvet dress, panty 
hose, boa, and wig. It was 
creative, but it wasn’t carving. 
Anyway, congratulations to David 
for winning “best of the show.” 

Second place went to Pam, 
who did a semi-self-portrait (?). 
And third place went to bartend¬ 
er Jim who added a coiffure of 
curly leaf lettuce, green olive 
eyes, and a carrot nose. Entertain¬ 
ment was provided by Tootsi and 
“Sarge” (singing live), Morgan 
(Bill), and Ugly Sister #5. 

US#5, incidentally, continued 
a tradition she started in 
Modesto. At any event she at¬ 
tends, she makes an announce¬ 
ment, passes the hat (as it were), 
and donates the collected monies 


to a charity. This evening was no 
exception and Roberta/Heather 
/US#5 collected $182.05 for 
EBAF. Hugs and kisses for that 
benevolent gesture. An addi¬ 
tional $100 was pledged by 
LeRoy, as was $200 from Carol H. 

SESQUIPEDALIAN 
CONERRAL REVISITED 

(A Reminding Nose) 

A call from Mr. Gay Reno, 
Kevin Ryan, requested that I re¬ 
mind everyone in San Francisco 
and the Bay Area about Shuttle 
Night ’87, his second in as many 
years. He extends an invitation to 
visitors from all over to join Reno 
in this night of fun and fund¬ 
raising. 

A passport may be purchased 
at any of Reno’s eight gay bars, 
for only $5. The passport entitles 
you to ride all night on the bus 
that will be running between all 
eight bars, from 5 p.m. Friday, 
Nov. 27, until 5 a.m. Saturday, 


Nov. 28. The exact itinerary is 
listed inside each passport. 

All profits and proceeds are to 
benefit the soon to be opened 
Reno Hospice House. 

RETINUE REVEALED 

(A “Household Word” Nose?) 

ISE Emperor and Empress IX 
Carlos and Tootsi will officially 
appoint their Rings of Saturn 
Court, 1988, at their Investiture 
this Sunday, Nov. 8, at Bjornson 
Hall in Oakland. 

I was given permission to 
release the names and titles of 
those who will be honored this 
Sunday: 

Prince Consorts to Emperor 
and Empress IX, Bobby Mc¬ 
Manus and Richard Rayl (Suzie); 
Imperial Crown Prince, Paul 
Moulton; Imperial Crown Prin¬ 
cess, Raven; Imperial Prince, 
David Moorman; Imperial Prin¬ 
cess, Morgan; Prince Royale, 
Hank Chavez; Princess Royale, 
LeRoy Sellberg; Grand Duke, Ted 
Taucher; Grand Duchess, Jackie 
O’Nice Ass; Duke, Steve Ahm; 
Duchess, Timmi Ryan; Count, 
Ralph Bittel; Countess, Marge 
Anderson; Viscount, Jim Malone; 
Viscountess, Debbie Anderson; 
Baron, Bill Hause; Baroness, 
Honey Hush; Marquis, Greg Park 
“Sarge”; Marquise, Heather 
(US#5); King Father, Jim San¬ 
chez; Queen Mother, Val Sousa 
(again!); Earls: Jim Simchera, 
Rico, and Jack. 

POTPOURRI 

(A Melange Nose) 

Far too many of you out there 
have not yet signed up with 
BASH’s services and merchan¬ 
dise volunteer lists posted in all 
bars in the county. The two 
houses will be available soon, and 
the work must be done. If the 
barbecue can be an entire com¬ 
munity effort, so must the work 
on the houses. Get with it! Sign 
up today. 


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bay area reporter NOVEMBER 5, 1987 


Eddy Paulson has set a date for 
his “auction items warehouse” in 
his basement. The event will be 
on Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 14 
and 15, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

Saturday will be designated as 
drop-off day, and Sunday will be 
assigned as pick-up day. Any 
items you wish to donate for any 
future auctions, drop them hy 
Ed’s house at 23981 Mission 
Blvd., Hayward, 538-3913 (or Big 
Mama’s 881-9310). A tax-deduct¬ 
ible receipt will be given on the 
spot. 

Items too big to deliver, or if 
you don’t have any drayage, give 
him a call and they will be pick¬ 
ed up on Sunday. At last report, 
there had been no volunteers for 
trucks, drivers, or sorters. As Ed 
told me, “You know I’ll get them, 
even if I have to pay for them!” 

Volunteers are needed to do¬ 
nate trucks, to drive, to process all 
the paper work, and to sort and 
catalogue all the merchandise. 
Give Ed a call. 

Little Mother’s A Nite Of Stars 
is that same Sunday, at the Spoil¬ 
ed Brat, 5 p.m. A good idea would 
be that when you wing your way 
to the Brat, leave a little earlier 
and drop off any salable mer¬ 
chandise at Ed’s house. 

Little Mother’s auction for 
Revol Memorabilia will be on 
Sunday, Nov. 22, at Town & 
Country, starting at 4 p.m. All 
proceeds will go to East Bay 
Assistance Fund. 

If a given problem causes 
many meetings, the meetings 
eventually become more impor¬ 
tant than the problem. I can 
smile at that. Love, Nez • 

Anti-Bias Bill 

(Continued from previous page) 
bring together the parties of a 
dispute when allegations of AIDS 
discrimination are raised. The 
county’s AIDS Project office and 
the Human Relations Commis¬ 
sion could both be involved in 
conflict resolution. 

If mediation fails, the county 
could then recommend either a 
formal administrative review or 
refer the case to the district attor¬ 
ney for prosecution. 

Ed Hilton of the AIDS task 
force said that the system 
established by the county will em¬ 
phasize timely reviews. He also 
said the health department plans 
to issue a policy statement on 
AIDS antibody tests emphasiz¬ 
ing that only anonymous testing 
should be permitted. 

Richard Silver, administrative 
assistant to Nolan, said the pro¬ 
posed ordinance is in keeping 
with the county’s “long history 
of expanding civil rights and 
equal protection laws.” Gay 
rights is included in the county’s 
civil rights ordinance. 

But Hilton cautions that the 
battle against AIDS discrimina¬ 
tion is facing new challenges as 
the perpetrators of bias employ 
more sophisticated tactics. 

In one recent complaint, 
Hilton said, a worker with Mex- 
icana Airlines was fired under a 
new company policy that requires 
termination of people who ex¬ 
haust their sick leave. Ironically, 
the person dismissed was suffer¬ 
ing from a ski injury. But a Mex- 
icana worker noted that the 
stringent mandatory termination 
policy was not in effect until 
AIDS cases began occurring. 

Hilton expects other employ¬ 
ers to engage in similar work-rule 
changes, noting it will be difficult 
to prove that they constitute dis¬ 
crimination. • 


PAGE 22 


















BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5. 1987 PAGE 23 


















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• DEVELOP STRATEGIES 
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• PROMOTE OUR 
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• MAKE SOCIAL 
AND POLITICAL 
CHANGE 


INFORMATION: 
552-5677 


Holly Near plays the Great American 
Music Hall Nov. 8 (Photo: I. Young) 


• A Death In The Family: film, Castro Theatre, Market 
and Castro sts., S.F., 7:30 PM, $5.50. The West Coast 
premiere of a human drama about sexuality, death, and 
the victory of love in a benefit for Frameline. 

• Can't Keep A Straight Face: comedy, Phoenix The¬ 
ater, 301 8th St., S.F., 8:30 PM, call 431-6777 for 
tickets. With Tom Ammiano, Suzy Berger, Laurie 
Bushman, Doug Holsclaw, Kelly Kittell, and Jeanine 
Strobel. Call 861-5079 for tickets. 

• Poppies: stage performance. The Studio at Theatre 
Rhinoceros, 2926 16th St., S.F., 8:30 PM, $8. The 
American premiere of the play by Noel Greig of the Gay 
Sweatshop of London, directed by Nicholas Deutsch, 
about an aging gay couple haunted by loves of the past 
and the menace of a militaristic future. Call 861-5079 
for tickets. 

• Black and White Men Together: East Bay rap, 3135 
Courtland, Oakland, 7:30 PM. This week's question, 
"Is racism coming to an end or has.it just changed its 
color?" Call 261-7922 for more information. 

• Parlez-vous Francais?: Si oui, venez a nos reunions 
amicales le premier Vendredi soir de chague mois a 8h. 
La bienvenue a tout niveau! La fete du 6 Nov. sera chez 
Neil. Pour de plus amples renseignements, appelez-le 
au 661-48-15. 

• Watch and Pray: weekend of meditation, prayer, and 
healing. Most Holy Redeemer Church, 100 Diamond St., 
S.F., Eucharist and Exposition of the Blessed Sacrarnent 
6 PM, Prayer Around the Cross 8 PM, Sacrament of 
Reconciliation 9 PM. Call 863-6259 for more informa¬ 
tion. 

• Spiritual Renewal: conducted by Rev. Val Valrejean, 
Grace Baptist Church, 10th and San Fernando, San Jose, 
7:30 PM. The theme is, "We Are Here For Such A Time 
As This." Sponsored by San Jose MCC. Call (408) 
279-2711 for more information. 

• Quaker Lesbian Conference: in Ben Lomond (near 
Santa Cruz), $25-$60. Call (408) 688-1333 for more 
information. Continued through Nov. 9. 

• Church of the Secret Gospel: service, 746 Clemen¬ 
tina St., Apt. 2, S.F., 8 PM, $2. Males 18-f welcome. 
Call 552-7339 for more information. 


SATURDAY 7 


• Gay and Lesbian Alliance at Stanford: open dance 
party for women and men, Elliott Program Center, Gov¬ 
ernor's Corner dormitory complex, Stanford Universi¬ 
ty campus (near Campus Dr. and Santa Teresa St.), 
9:30 PM-1 AM, $3. Call 723-1488 for more information. 


• San Francisco Pool Association: AIDS benefit auc¬ 
tion, Cafe San Marcos, 2367 Market St., S.F., preview 
10 AM-1 PM, auction 3 PM. Gift certificates, furniture, 
and collectables. Open Hand and other AIDS charities 
will benefit. 


• Can't Keep A Straight Face: comedy (see Friday 
listing for details). 


• Poppies: stage performance (see Friday listing for 
details). 


• Different Spokes/San Francisco: decide and ride. 
Meet at 1 PM at McLaren Lodge in Golden Gate Park, 
S.F. to decide on a ride. 


• Gourmet Potiuck: 7 PM in San Francisco. Call 
775-6143 for more information. 


• Faith Winthrop and Gus Gustavson: music. Piano 
Zinc, 708 14th St., S.F., 8:30 PM. 

• Gay and Lesbian Outreach to Elders: men's brunch 
and games for older gay men (60-t-), 145 Guerrero St., 
S.F., bring food to share. Call 626-7000 for more infor¬ 
mation. 

• High Tech Gays: monthly meeting, Billy DeFrank Us- 
bian and Gay Community Center, 1040 Park Ave., San 
Jose, potiuck 6:30 PM (bring a dish to share), business 
meeting 8 PM. Ginny Hagopian, president of the Board 
of Directors of the Billy DeFrank Community Center, will 
speak. 

• Gay Volleyball: playground at Petro Jr. High, 19th and 
DeHaro, 11 AM. 


• Thanksgiving Potiuck: for gay and lesbian 
vegetarians. Call (408) 773-1335 or (408) 426-7315 
for more information. 


• Men Behind Bars: open-call auditions, Jon Sims 
Center For The Performing Arts, 1519 Mission St., S.F., 
12:30 PM. Tap dancers with an excellent jazz sense and 
attractive, muscular men with a sense of rhythm and 
dance and able to carry a tune are needed. The produc¬ 
tion is slated for six performances Feb. 12-15 (Presi¬ 
dent's Day weekend) with an invitational dress rehearsal 
for PWAs and their support staff. It will be a benefit for 
the Coming Home Hospice Endowment Fund, the S.F. 
AIDS Emergency Fund, and other AIDS charities. Call 
621-6476 for more information. 


• S.F. Tsunamis: Masters swim meet, S.F. State Univer¬ 
sity pool, 19th Ava and Holloway, S.F., all day. 

• EastBay FrontRunners: Lake Merritt run. Meet on the 
corner of 14th St. and Oak St. (near Cameron Stanford 
House), Oakland, at 9:30 AM. Flat three-mile loop. Call 
261-3246 for more information. 


• San Francisco FrontRunners: Meet at Stow Lake 
Boathouse in Golden Gate Park, S.F., at 9 AM. No-host 
brunch follows; beginners welcome. Call 647-3227 or 
337-8704 for more information. 


• Watch and Pray: weekend of meditation, prayer, and 
healing. Most Holy Redeemer Church, 100 Diamond St, 
S.F., Morning Prayer 8 AM, Rosary 9 AM, Mass of 
Anointing noon, Eucharist and Closing Benediction 
5 PM. Call 863-6259 for more information. 


• Spiritual Renewal: conducted by Rev. Val Valrejean, 
three-hour workshop (10 AM-1 PM) on "How To Gefi 
And Keep Love: The Quest For Enduring Love In A 
Throw-Away Age" in Room 25, Grace Baptist Church, 
10th and San Fernando, San Jose, service and prayer 
for healing 7:30 PM. Sponsored by San Jose MCC. Call . 
(408) 279-2711 for more information. 


• Church of the Secret Gospel: phallic fellowship, 746 
Clementina St., Apt. 2, S.F., doors open 8 PM-1 AM. 
Males 18-f welcome. Call 621-1887 for more informa¬ 
tion. 

• Men Seeking Relationships: mixer/workshop, San 
Francisco MCC, 150 Eureka St., S.F., 7:30-10 PM, $5. 
Sponsored by the Partners Institute. Call 343-8541 for 
more information. 


• CMC Carnival: Service Employees Union Hall, 240 
Golden Gate Ave., S.F., noon to 8 PM, $8 in advance, 
$10 at the door. Music, entertainment, booths, open bar, 
Mr. CMC Carnival contest. Much of the proceeds will go 
to benefit AIDS charities. Tickets at Headlines, S.F. 
Eagle, Kimo's, The Mint, The Village, Mr. S Leathers, and 
the Kokpit. 

• Lesbian and Gay Parenting Fair: Women's Building, 
3543 18th St., S.F., 11 AM-5 PM. Information booths, 
crafts, books, maternity, baby, and child products; live 
entertainment, activities for kids, food; films and 
workshops. Call 641-0220 for more information. 

• Poppies: stage performance (see Friday listing for 
details). 

• Holly Near: music. Great American Music Hall, 859 
O'Farrell St., S.F., 7 and 9:30 PM, $12.50. Holly Near 
and her band in the "Don't Hold Back" tour. 

• Solo Cabaret II: music featuring members of the S.F. 
Gay Men's Chorus, Teddy Bears, 131 Gough St., S.F., 
7:30 PM, $5. 

• Brazilian Beat: music, El Rio, 3158 Mission St., S.F., 
4-8 PM, $3. 

• Variety Show: Bench and Bar, 120 11th St., Oakland, 
10 PM. Singers, dancers, comedy, and impersonators. 


FRIDAY 6 


BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5. 1987 PAGE 24 











































jflllllHilllliHlltiHiniiifT 


WEEK 



• Different Spokes/San Francisco: decide and ride. 
Meet at MacLaren Lodge in Golden Gate Park, S.F., at 
10 AM to decide bn a ride. 

• Tsunami Masters Swim Team: practice. King Pool, 
Third and Carroll sts., S.F., 10 AM to noon. Call 
285-5659 for more information. 

• Spiritual Renewal: conducted by Rev. Val Valrejean, 
Grace Baptist Church, 10th and San Fernando, San Jose, 
6:30 PM. Sponsored by San Jose MCC. Call (408) 
279-2711 for more information. 

• Diablo Valley MCC: worship and communion serv¬ 
ice, 2258 Concord Blvd., Concord, 10 AM. Call 
827-2960 for more information. 

• Integrity: informal Eucharist for the community, St. 
John's Church, 1661 15th St., S.F., 5:30 PM. Report and 
discussion of the March on Washington at 6:30 PM. 

• Affirmation: gay and lesbian Mormons, San Francis¬ 
co MCC, 150 Eureka St., S.F., 7 PM. Call 641-4554 for 
more information. 

• Radiant Light Ministries: Sunday celebration of love 
and life, Swedish American Hall, 2174 Market St, S.F., 
10 AM. Call 861-1667 for more information. 

• New Life MCC: worship and communion service, 
1823 9th St., Berkeley, 5 PM. Call 843-9355 for more 
information. 

• Calvary MCC: worship service, 2124 Brewster Ave., 
Redwood City, 6 PM. Call 368-0188 for more informa¬ 
tion. 

• MCC of the Redwoods: worship and communion 
service, Olive and Throckmorton Sts., Mill Valley, 
10:45 AM. Call 388-2315 for more information. 

• Latter-Day Saints: sacrament meeting for lesbians 
and gays and their friends, Sacramento Lambda Com¬ 
munity Center, 1931 L St., Sacramento, 1 PM. Con¬ 
ducted by the Sacramento Family of the Restoration 
Church of Jesus Christ. Call (916) 447-5755 for more 
information. 

• Golden Gate MCC: Sunday worship services, 48 
Belcher St. (between 14th St. and Duboce), S.F., 
12:30 PM, 7 PM. Call 474-4848 for details. 

• Holy Trinity Church: meets at the Billy DeFrank Com¬ 
munity Center, 1040 Park Ave., San Jose, 10 AM to 
noon. 


MONDAY 9 


• William Banovetz, Robin Sutherland, and Geraldine 
Walther: play the works of Poulenc, Tennenbaum, Dut- 
tileux, Strauss, and Loeffler, Heilman Hall, San Francisco 
Conservatory of Music, 1201 Ortega, S.F., 8 PM, $7. 
Call 564-8086 for more information. 

• S.F. AIDS Theatregroup: workshop and organiza¬ 
tional meeting! 7 PM, free. Open to all people with 
AIDS/ARC to develop a performance script dramatizing 
the experience of living with AIDS/ARC. Call.282-3961 
for more information. 

• The People Rise!: revolutionary jack-off party to 
celebrate the anniversary of the Russian Revolution, 
890 Folsom St., S.F., doors open 7:30-8:30 PM, $5, 
BYOB. Worker's festish clothing encouraged. Presented 
by the S.F. Jacks. 

• Buddy Connection: safe sex workshop for gay and 
bisexual men, San Francisco MCC, 150 Eureka St., S.F., 
7-10 PM. Sponsored by the S.F. AIDS Foundation. Call 
863-AIDS for more information. 

• Gay and Lesbian Outreach to Eiders: support group 
or older gay men (60+), Operation Concern, 1853 Mar¬ 
ket St., S.F., 7-8:30 PM. Call 626-7000 for more infor 
mation. 


TUESDAY 10 


• James Broughton's 74th Birthday: celebration 
Upstairs at Leona's, 2367 Telegraph Ave., Berkeley 
8:30 PM, $3. Poetry at Larry Blake's. 

• Homopolo: gay and lesbian Waterpolo team workout 
Oakland High School pool, 1055 McArthur Blvd., Oak 
end, 7:15-9 PM. All levels of swimmers encouraged 

all 824-4848 for more information. 

• Gay Support Group For People With ARC: and alco 

noi/substance abuse. Operation Concern, 1853 Market 
ROC ^ Individual and group process. Call 

b-7000 for in-take appointment. 

Maintaining A Healthy Immune System With Natural 
^edicine: lecture, San Francisco MCC, 150 Eureka St., 
• •. 7:30-10 PM, frea Janet Zand, NO, OMD, will speak. 


WEDNESDAY 11 


Mil'!'® Comedy: Bernal de Janeiro Room, El Rio, 3158 
'on St, S.F., 8-10 PM, $2. Danny Williams will MC. 

Feminism and Gay Men: November men's series, San 
MCC, 150 Eureka St, S.F., 7:30-9 PM. Call 
-4434 for more information. 

Workers Anonymous: social and support 
i_? P' 261 Fell St., S.F., 11 AM. Call 357-0500 for more 

"^formation 


• Bay Area Network of Gay and Lesbian Educators: 
East Bay chapter monthly meeting, 6152 Dover St 
Oakland, 6:30 PM. Call 658-3421 for more information! 

• Bay Area Network of Gay and Lesbian Educators: 
South Bay chapter monthly meeting, Billy DeFrank Les¬ 
bian and Gay Community Center, 1040 Park Ave. San 
Jose, 6:30 PM. Call (408) 737-0214 or (408) 978-5751 
for more information. 

• Gay Support Group: for people with alco¬ 
hol/substance abuse issues. Operation Concern, 1853 
Market St., S.F., 7-9 PM. Call 626-7000 for in-take ap¬ 
pointment. 

• Wednesday Matinee: sponsored by Operation Con¬ 
cern's Gay and Lesbian Outreach to Elders and North 
of Market Senior Services, 333 Turk St., S.F., 2:15-4 PM. 
Movies, games, and refreshments. Call 626-7000 for 
more information. 

• Women's Writer's Workshop: for older lesbians 
(60-f) and their friends. Operation Concern, 1853 Mar¬ 
ket St., S.F., 6-8 PM. Sponsored by Gay and Lesbian 
Outreach to Elders. Call 626-7000 for more information. 


THURSDAY 12 


• Home For The Holidays: Golden Gate Business As¬ 
sociation member showcase. The Comstock, 1409 Sut¬ 
ter St., S.F., 5:30-8:30 PM, members in $8 in advance, 
$10 at the door, $15 guests. Featuring merchandise and 
services for the holiday season. 

• Feathers 'N Flesh: male dancers and female imper¬ 
sonators, N'Touch, 1548 Polk St., S.F., 10 PM. Desiree 
will MC. 

• Gus Gustavson and Faith Winthrop: music. Piano 
Zinc, 708 14th St., S.F., 8:30 PM. 

• Open Mike Comedy: with Darlene Popovic and 
friends, Belden 22, 22 Belden Place, S.F., 6-9 PM. 

• Alexander Hamilton American Legion Post 448: 
meeting. Veterans Memorial Building, Room 213, S.F., 
7 PM. 

• Black and White Men Together: rap on how relation¬ 
ships are affected by economics, 1350 Waller St., S.F., 
7:30 PM. Call 931-BWMT for more information. 

• Gay and Lesbian outreach to Elders: Older Gay Men's 
Friendship Group (60-I-), meeting. Friendship Room, 711 
Eddy St, S.F., 2:45 PM. Call 626-7000 for more infor¬ 
mation. 

• San Francisco FrontRunners: meet at McLaren 
Lodge in Golden Gate Park, S.F., at 6:30 PM. No-host 
dinner follows, beginners welcome. Call 647-3227 or 
337-8704 for more information. 

• Gay Support Group For People With HIV+ : and al¬ 
cohol/substance abuse. Operation Concern, 1853 Mar¬ 
ket St, S.F., 7-9 PM. individual and group process. Call 
626-7000 for in-take appointment 

• Bingo: To benefit Coming Home Hospice, S.F. AIDS 
Foundation Food Bank, and the AIDS Emergency Fund, 
Most Holy Redeemer Church, 100 Diamond St, S.F., 
doors open 6 PM, games begin 7 PM, $10 minimum 
buy-in. An alcohol-free space Snacks and non-alcoholic 
beverages sold. Smoking and non-smoking areas. Pull 
Tabs, door prizes, raffle. 



Join the folks at Coming Home Hospice 
Bingo every Thursday (Photo: S. Martin) 

The Bay Area Reporter welcomes organizations, 
businesses, and individuals to submit items for its week¬ 
ly calendar. Placement in the calendar is free and the 
sole responsibility of the editors. Deadline: 5 PM on 
Thursdays. 



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BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 25 































































(Photo: R. Pruzan) 


BAY AREA REPORTER 

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 


S)roggeb To Tbe Xbge 



Ethyl Eichelberger Comes to the Coast 


by John F. Karr 

elen Hayes be damned! 
The First Lady of the 
American Theatre is a 
man named Ethyl Eichelberger. 
It’s a title he’s earned by flam¬ 
boyantly assaying the roles of 
more of the great women of histo¬ 
ry than any other actor, and in 
self-authored scripts, as well. He 
won an Obie as Lucrezia Borgia, 
and among his many other roles 
are Clytemnestra and Empress 
Carlotta, Medea and Medusa, 
Catherine the Great, Lola Mon- 
tez. Queen Nefertiti, Phedre, 
and, toweringly tragic, Jocasta 
(the tragedy twice subtitled, 
“Boy Crazy,’’ or “She Married 
Her Son’’). 

In these performance pieces, 
Eichelberger appears in rattily 
glamorous gowns and impro¬ 
bably tumultuous wigs, wearing 
more make-up than was thought 
could adhere to the skin, the 
declaim in grandly manic mono¬ 
logue the women’s eloquent 
defense of the ostensibly grotes¬ 
que details of their lives, punc¬ 
tuating throughout with asides to 
the audience, anachronistic edit¬ 
orial commentary, and unabash¬ 
edly theatrical ditties which he 
sings, wails, and yodels while ac¬ 
companying himself on a wheezy 
concertina. These diversions are 
graced by the performer’s six- 
and-a-half foot height, and his 
penchant for throwing it through 
acrobatics-as-punctuation: to il¬ 
lustrate the excitement of the reu¬ 
nion affected during his last 
speech in the Lincoln Center 
Comedy of Errors, he threw him¬ 
self from a precarious perch atop 
spike heels into a full somersault 
and landed in even fuller splits, 
denying first gravity and then 
physiology. Such bodily effusive¬ 
ness, coupled with the depth of 
emotion and brilliant language 
of his scripts and the grandness 
of his personifications, caused 
The New York Times to call Ethyl 
Eichelberger’s acts “laws unto 
themselves.’’ 

They were laws of a decidedly 
bent perspective, and having held 
them down, Eichelberger has 
been bending them further: with 


an eye to the best of both gen¬ 
ders, Eichelberger’s now playing 
men. Don’t be alarmed; only the 
gender has changed. There are 
still the affecting songs; still the 
sudden perceptions and baroque 
splendors of the writing; still the 
new wave commedia acting which 
bemusingly combines the Grand 
Style with stark knowingness 
(Sarah Bernhardt directed by 
Bertolt Brecht). There’s even the 
same amount of make-up. But 
now Ethyl’s playing men, and it’s 
two of these he’ll be performing 
at a special one-night-only 
presentation at ACT Nov. 15: 
Leer, Eichlberger’s gloss on King 
who-else, and The Tempest of 
Chim-Lee, which assimilates 
elements of Shakespeare’s play 
into a quakingly Elchelbergian 
Chinatown opium den in 1906. 
Can you guess which tempest 
Chim-Lee will conjure? 

★ ★ ★ 

is last name really is 
Eichelberger. He was 
born to Amish parents on 
a farm in Illinois 42 years ago. He 
was such a clumsy kid they gave 
him tap dancing lessons, and 
then they proved understanding 
and encouraging when this led 
him to pursue a career in the 
theater. 

He never wore his mother’s 
clothes around the house, and 
had no inkling his fame would ar¬ 
rive in a dress. He played Hamlet 
and Oedipus while in the drama 
department of Knox College, and 
played a score of legitimately 
male roles during seven years of 
study with Adrian Hail at the 
Trinity Square Repertory Com¬ 
pany. Slowly, however, he started 
to score with non-traditional 
roles. 

“Ethyl was wild and extraordi¬ 
nary,’’ recalled company director 
Adrian Hall last year for a News- 
day writer. For instance, to play 
the Incan God in Royal Hunt of 
the Sun, Ethyl shaved his head 
and body and appeared totally 
nude without a hair on him. 

That may have been the last of 
his “normal’’ roles. 


“I got cast in a couple sort-of 
drag roles,’’ said Ethyl, “and I 
found that I did them really 
well.’’ 

Feeling one should capitalize 
on what one does well. Ethyl was 
off. Drag disguises the familiar as 
the alien, the forbidden, while it 
simultaneously reveals opposing 
facets inherent in the original. 
The transformation of drag pro¬ 
vides a double point of view for 
audience and actor alike. It can 
take a performer — and his 
audience—right to the edge. 
Ethyl found that was a place he 
not only liked, but gloried in. 

“What I like about a man play¬ 
ing a women,” he told Newsday, 
“is that you can play archetypes 
and emotions bigger and grander 
than they are in reality.” He was 
also attracted to the political pos¬ 
sibilities of drag. “It throws a 
monkey wrench into everything; 
it knocks people off balance.” 

More important, however, was 
the jolt Eichelberger himself 
received from the change. 

“When I put on that persona,” 
Ethyl said in a recent interview, 
“it would spring from somewhere 
deep inside. It was like Bnding 
yourself.” 

The persona he found needed 
gaudy and grandiloquent vehi¬ 
cles for self-expression, needed to 
move to New York to pursue 
realization, and needed most of 
all to change its first name. 
Eichelberger won’t admit to 
remembering what this used to 
be, but said, ‘ ‘ ‘Ethyl’ is a starter, 
like gasoline, so I took that.” 

The newly dubbed Ethyl 
started creating wigs and make¬ 
up to earn a living, while perfor¬ 
ming and studying with Charles 
Ludlam’s Theatre of the Ridi¬ 
culous. Eichelberger reverential¬ 
ly credits Ludlam with almost 
everything—the comedia style, 
the songs, the mugging and in¬ 
terpolations to keep an audience 
off-balance—“Charles Ludlam, 
that’s where that all comes 
from.” 

Ludlam’s death has ended 


Eichelberger’s association with 
his Theatre. 

“He was someone I really lov¬ 
ed, the only reason I was ever 
there was for Charles.” The cause 
of that death, AIDS, is also a ma¬ 
jor cause in Eichelberger’s turn¬ 
ing from female to male roles. 

“When I play women,” said, 
“that comes out of joy. And I’m 
not that happy. If you want the 
truth, it’s very hard to write 
women’s roles right now because 
of what’s gone down the line in 
the last few years.” 

But the AIDS crisis has coin¬ 
cided with another causal factor 
in Eichelberger’s big switch, 
which he conspiritorially reveal¬ 
ed to me. 

“My 40th birthday.” 

The truth, Ethyl said, is that 
“You’re prettier when you’re 
younger.” But seriously: “I’m 
not a child anymore. I’m an 
adult, there’s no denying it. I’m 
trained, too—and I’m proud of 
my American training—so now 
it’s put up or shut up. 

“I thought I would step out as 
a gay artist and say, ‘Hey look, I 
don’t do drag because 1 can’t do 
other things!’ I still intend to do 
women, but I thought that after 
40 it’s another step. The next 
stop I want to take is to compete 
with the Peter Donats, the 
famous actors.” 

Donat, of course, plays Lear in 
act’s current production, and 
it’s because of that mounting 
that Eichelberger is coming to 
town. ACT Artistic Director Ed¬ 
ward Hastings is credited with 
believing that Ethyl’s Leer would 
be a good compliment to their 
own. 

So what is Leer? 

“It’s the story of King Lear, 
but set in America, because I‘m 
an American artist. I asked 
myself, ‘What is an American 
equivalent of Lear? Because I 
wanted to do what Shakespeare 
had done, which was that he 
wrote his own version of the Lear 
story. I said, ‘Alright, I’ll write my 
version.’ 


“Now, in our heritage we have 
all these great white god char¬ 
acters—old men with wild white 
hair and white facial hair who are 
beyond beyond. They’re icons— 
Einstein, Stokowski, Mark Twain, 
Colonel Sanders. And the Amer¬ 
ican equivalent would also be a 
family like Jimmy Carter’s, which 
seems to be unassuming but 
which owns huge areas of the 
country. 

“So my Lear is an old planta¬ 
tion owner. I tell the same story, 
it’s not innately British, about 
someone who has gotten out of 
touch, too powerful and greedy to 
see what is actually real.” 

Ethyl also gets to play Cor¬ 
delia, voicing her lines from be¬ 
hind a dress hanging on a line. 
And he also plays the Fool. And 
he rattles the thundersheet which 
accompanies Leer’s roaring in 
this carpetbag of Southern 
gothic, Victorian melodrama, 
children’s games, Hamlet, sen¬ 
timental songs, and A Streetcar 
Named Desire, as the charact¬ 
ers, said Ethyl, “thrash out what 
you owe to someone you love.” 

The Tempest of Chim-Lee 
plays looser with Shakespeare, 
taking its actual story from the 
verismo opera UOrocolo by 
Leoni. Set in San Francisco’s 
Chinatown, it allows Ethyl to play 
“the personification of evil,” 
Chim-Lee, who runs an opium 
den, breathes fire, and concocts 
an insidious plot to have his way 
with the beauteous Ai Yin before 
she and her father (both played 
by Ethyl) strangle him with his 
own pigtail (“a feat of double 
jointed dexterity,” said The New 
York Times). 

This Tempest has less 
Shakespeare in it than Leer be¬ 
cause, although contracted to 
write and perform it. Ethyl was 
Shakespeare-fatigued from the 
Lincoln Center Comedy of 
Errors, 

“I mean, who wants to do 
Shakespeare at Lincoln Center? 
They do it all the time in Central 
Park and at the Public Theatre. 

(Continued on next page) 


BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 26 















Shakespeare’s KING LEAR gets an outrageous new look with Ethyl 
brilliantly playing The King, Cordelia, and The Fool in LEER. 

Ethyl rocks San Francisco’s Chinatown in 1906 with 
THE TEMPEST OF CHIM-LEE. 

ONE PERFORAAANCE ONLY! 

Sunday, Nov. 15, 7pm 
CHARGE BY PHONE 415/673-6440 

Ticket prices: $6, SIO, SIO ■ Box Office opens 10am Daily 
in the V of Theatre Row ■ Geary Theatre ■ Geary at Mason ■ San Francisco 

AAAERICAN CONSERVATORY THEATRE 


The Emphasis Is On 
Prolonging Life 


by Steve Warren 


Ethyl Eichelberger 


Ethyl 

(Continued from previous page) 

I said, ‘I’ll wait to go to Lincoln 
Center with my own show some¬ 
day.’ So I turned them down 
twice, but then did it to work 
with the Flying Karamozov Bro¬ 
thers. Well—I left glitter in the 
Vivian Beaumont Theatre they’ll 
never get rid of. And I wore at 
least four kinds of perfume every 
night. I thought, ‘They hired a 
drag queen—they’ll get one!’ ” 

Having made it through the 
run of the show, which was seen 
on national television. Ethyl is 
taking a Shakespeare break by 
writing a full evening’s show in 
which he’ll play Abraham Lin¬ 
coln and then return after inter¬ 
mission to play Mary Todd! 

But performing his roles is not 
his chief glory. 


(Photo: R. Pruzan) 


“I want to do the writing— 
that’s what drives me on. You talk 
of gay history. . .it’s making 
one’s.. .it’s leaving something 
that enhances our world, the gay 
world, that betters it. For me, that 
isn’t acting, which can be tread¬ 
ing water, but writing. 

“It is someone of my ilk stand¬ 
ing up and speaking one’s 
mind.’’ 

So there will be more gargan¬ 
tuan women in Ethyl’s life, and 
men too, for if he wants to play 
roles in the way only he can play, 
he’ll have to supply those unique¬ 
ly turbulent scripts. And al¬ 
though the scripts allow him a 
platform for a variety of issues— 
gay, drag, and feminist—there’s 
always Ethyl’s bottom-line desire, 
one that only his writing can 
fulfill: 

“I like to come on as extraor¬ 
dinary people.” • 


For charge orders telephone 
(415) 626-7539 


Pets are Wonderful Support for People with AIDS/ARC is a California non-profit corporation dedicated 
to helping people with AIDS/ARC keep their pets by providing various seAlices to them and their pets 
and by helping educate the medical and lay communities about pets and AIDS/ARC. 


A.C.T. presents The One and Only 


in Two Hilarious 
Bay Area Premieres 


“A REAL FIRE-BREATHER! 
— The New York Times 


ow that we’re supposed to 
have become sophisticat¬ 
ed with regard to AIDS 
the emphasis has shifted from 
preparing for death to prolong¬ 
ing and enhancing life. From that 
perspective, A Death in the Fami¬ 
ly is retrogressive. But for 1985 
when it takes place, for New 
Zealand where it was made and 
for much of America, it will meet 
people spot-on where they are. 

Written by Peter Wells, who co¬ 
directed with Stewart Main, the 
film recreates the last 16 days in 
the life of Andrew Boyd, played 
with chilling realism by John 
Watson. The son of conservative 
farmers, he’s taken in by a friend 
for the final stages of his illness 
so he won’t have to die in the hos¬ 
pital. Four other friends move in 
to help care for Andrew during 
the death watch. 

“He brought us together,” 
says Simon (Jon Brazier), the nar¬ 
rator. “The house became the 
core—at its center Andy, dying,” 
The film traces Simon’s growth 
from his initial fears and misgiv¬ 
ings through the difference his 
mere presence makes to his ulti¬ 
mate ability to celebrate his 
friend’s life and get on with his 
own. Halfway through he says, “I 
feel less frightened about AIDS 
now than I ever have.” It should 
be nostalgic for those who have 
been through similar experiences 


and a training vehicle for those 
who are about to be. 

Some of the conversations 
could almost have come from 
Doug Holsclaw’s play. Life of the 
Party, while scenes around the 
bed recall Artie Bressan’s film 
Buddies. San Francisco, New 
York, New Zealand—our loving 
response to the crisis has been 
the same. 

Overly arty directorial touches 
provide what may be a necessary 
distraction from the intense 
realism of the performances and 
situations. Andrew’s blood fami¬ 
ly visits on at least two occasions, 
coming to accept and begin to 
understand their son’s extended 
family. A scene in which Andrew 
is bathed by his friends takes on 
a sweet eroticism. 

Running less than an hour, A 
Death in the Family makes an im¬ 
pact you’ll feel many hours later. 
It’s accompanied by a wonderful 
short. My First Suit, written by 
Wells and directed by Main. 
Shown in last year’s S.F. Interna¬ 
tional Lesbian and Gay Film Fes¬ 
tival, it’s about a gay teenager 
whose divorced parents both in¬ 
sist on getting him a suit for the 
school dance. 

Tomorrow night’s opening of 
the weeklong Castro run is a ben¬ 
efit for Frameline, producers of 
that festival. • 


A scene from A Death In The Family 


Pets Are Wonderful Support for People with AIDS/ARC 
Invites you to Attend a 
Special Benefit Performance of 
The American Conservatory Theatre's 
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On December 8,1987 at 8 p.m. 
at the Geary Theatre 
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BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 27 































Ascension of 'Descents'? 


Local Trio Hopes to Turn Obscure Tennessee Williams Play Into Hit 



Ron Dorn (top), Este Gardner, and Timmy Spence (bottom) 
in Seven Descents of Myrtle 


by Robert Frank 

A downtown San Francisco res¬ 
taurant set the mood. It harken¬ 
ed back, with its bright, white 
walls and ceiling, its glossy, red 
vinyl booths and its jukebox 
songs like Stand By Me to the 
1950s, the decade of greatest suc¬ 
cess for America’s finest gay 
playwright, Tennesee Williams. 

An extroverted young actor of 
the 1980s, Timmy Spence, sat in 
one red vinyl booth and talked 
about a lesser-known Williams 
play. He hopes a local revival of 
The Seven Descents of Myrtle 
will help this 1968 play gain the 
following of Williams’ 1950s suc¬ 
cesses. 

Myrtle will be performed by 
the San Francisco Actors Theatre 
at Trinity Church, Bush and 
Gough Streets, Friday and Satur¬ 
day nights, from Nov. 6-Dec. 12. 

As Spence talked about “Myr¬ 
tle,” the predominantly white 
motif of the 1950s-style restau¬ 
rant blended with symbols from 
many of Williams’ plays. There 
was A Streetcar Named Desire in 
which Blanche DuBois’ name, 
her prediliction for white clothes 
and pale, wane youths and her 
pale skin were constant themes. 
There also was Suddenly Last 
Summer, in which Sebastian 
Venable always wore white and 
had his cousin, Kathy, put on a 
white, one-piece bathing suit to 
lure the darker Mediterranean 
youths. There also were descrip¬ 
tions of white-hot sun and bleach¬ 
ed sand. 


The Seven Descents of Myrtle, 
which has been compared to 
Streetcar, has its white motif, too. 
Spence sees similarities between 
the two plays. 

He says, “There are conflicts 
between the macho, dark sinister 


force and the frail, white victim,” 
with someone caught in between 
(like Stella in Streetcar). He add¬ 
ed that there is a loss of control 
of one’s life and property, along 
with a transition, or descent, into 
unreality and mental breakdown. 


The young actor relishes what 
he says are Williams’ “obvious 
inside jokes. 

“Two of the main characters, 
Lot and Myrtle, meet on a televi¬ 
sion show of the Fifties and Six¬ 
ties called Queen For a Dayf he 
said. “The third character. 
Chicken, frequently refers to Lot 
as Myrtle’s ‘TV husband,”’ a 
double meaning more recogni¬ 
zable to audiences today than 
when Williams wrote the play in 
1968. 

Spence also appreciates Wil¬ 
liams’ use of what he calls the 
“Elizabethan stage, with its three 
levels: upper level, ground or 
stage level and a trap door to an 
unseen lower level.” Grounded in 
and bound by what Spence calls, 
“Christianity of the Elizabethan 
Age,” the stages for plays of that 
era represented some form of 
heaven, earth and hell, or Good, 
Human Frailty and Evil. 

Myrtle is a puzzle in Broadway 
history. It was good enough for 
Estelle Parsons to get a Tony 
nomination. It was good enough 
to include fine character actors 
such as Harry Guardino and 
Brian Bedford in the roles of 
Chicken and Lot. But the play 
itself was a flop. 

So, why revive this play, which 
was even re-worked by Williams? 
Spence, who plays Lot, says that 
he and his colleagues, Ron Dorn 
(Chicken) and Este Gardner 
(Myrtle) have a strong liking for 
the play. The fact that it hasn’t 
been seen often is a valid reason 
for doing it. Streetcar, The Glass 
Menagerie, Cat on a Hot Tin 
Roof and some other Williams 
plays have been presented quite 
often and have been seen by 
millions. Myrtle will be new to 


almost everyone. 

Lot is a fragile, male Blanche 
DuBois-type character. He knows 
he’s dying and doesn’t want his 
property to go to his loutish half- 
brother, Chicken. Lot also has a 
new bride. Myrtle, but he cannot 
consummate the marriage. Myr¬ 
tle is caught between the two and, 
like Stella in Streetcar, is being 
pulled in either direction. 

SOLID BACKGROUNDS 

The three performers have 
solid backgrounds. Spence, a 
former master of ceremonies for 
the Zasu Pitts Memorial Orches¬ 
tra, studied with Stella Adler 
(who knew Williams) in New York 
and David Perry in London. Dorn 
has appeared on stage with the 
San Francisco Reperatory and 
the Lorraine Hansberry Theatre 
Company. Gardner is active in 
film and television work in the 
Bay Area, has studied at ACT and 
has performed for the S.F. Actors 
Theatre in productions oi Action, 
The Women and LaRonde. 

The three performers decided 
to do Myrtle while studying with 
Jean Shelton. They recruited 
Maria Mazer, who directed Will 
Dunne’s The Bridge in San Fran¬ 
cisco and Strindberg’s Miss Julie 
in New York. 

Now, they’re all keeping their 
fingers crossed, hoping that San 
Franciscans will embrace Myrtle, 
Chicken and Lot like they have 
Blanche, Stella and Sebastian. 

The curtain goes up at 8 p.m. 
Tickets are $9 for students and 
seniors and $11 for general ad¬ 
mission. For the opening week¬ 
end, $15 will not only cover ad¬ 
mission, but champagne as well. 
Call 524-1306 for more informa¬ 
tion. • 



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A Tribute to the Finest 



Bettie Blount 


by David Alex Nahmod 

B ettie Blount is a cute, 
perkey and highly ener¬ 
getic black jazz singer 
who is devoting much of her 
career to^ Tribute to the Finest, 
her self-directed one-woman 
show. Tribute played last year at 
the Western Addition Cultural 
Center. Happily it can be said 
that the show has definitely im¬ 
proved. Last year’s show was a 
beautifully performed but poor¬ 
ly staged homage to six great 
black jazz singers. After an off¬ 
stage recorded narrator gave the 
audience pertinent information 


about a performer, Blount- 
through song, dance and mono¬ 
logue—gave the audience the 
great hits of Pearl Bailey, Billie 
Holliday, Bessie Smith, Dinah 
Washington, Mahalia Jackson, 
and Josephine Baker. 

The difference in the concept 
is that the new narrator is a live 
person, Samm Gray. He becomes 
an integral part of the show, 
delivering his monologues with 
great dramatic flair. His presence 
adds a great deal to the pacing of 
the show. Gray also joins Blount’s 

(Continued on next page) 


BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 28 





































The Choreographer of The Eighties 



S ome people don’t like Mark 
Morris’ work. After last Fri¬ 
day night’s performance of 
the Mark Morris Dance Group at 
Zellerhach Hall in Berkeley, just 
when I was thinking I’d found the 
choreographer we could all agree 
on, a woman remarked to me that 
she hadn’t enjoyed the program. 

Morris is a choreographer of 
humor and invention, whose for¬ 
mal integrity and musicality 
soothes the ballet lover, and 
whose eclecticism and lack of 
pretentiousness satisfies the 
modern dance buff: a man who 
dances in drag without looking as 
though he’s kidding, and who 
pairs men with men and women 
with women without turning it 
into a political statement. In 
short, Morris appears to be the 
contemporary choreographer 
who has it all together, including 
a company of able, responsive 
dancers who look like ordinary 
people. But this woman, not 
much older than I, who sees a 
great deal of ballet and modern 
dance, told me she thought it was 
not for her generation. 

The best of Morris’ ensemble 
dances create a context in which 
music and movement are reflex- 
ively supportive, so that, as has 
been said of Balanchine’s ballets, 
one feels one “sees the music 
and hears the dancing.” Nothing 
extraneous mars the neatness of 
the craftsmanship. Cued by his 
music, whatever it is (And it could 
be anything: on the two Berkeley 
programs we heard Mozart, Lou 
Harrison, Country-and-Western, 
Baroque, and 20th-Century 
French music.), Morris gets peo¬ 
ple on and off the stage with 
dazzling efficacy, negotiating 
every twist and turn of even the 
most complex scores. He’s better 
at symmetrical counterpoint 
than anyone, except maybe Bal¬ 
anchine. 

Every Mark Morris dance 
looks different from every other 
one—and Morris is prolific. But 
his hallmarks, campiness, clean 
composition, and musical acuity 
always turn up. In My Party, to 
Jean Francaix’s Trio for Strings 
in C Major, ten dancers play 
dancing games—in lines and 
with partners—just like at 
children’s parties in the 1950s. 
But every moment reflects the wit 
and structure of the music. Occa¬ 
sional outrageous asides, like 
when everyone suddenly drops to 
the floor and begins dry fucking 
furiously, seem as structurally 
sound as anything else we’ve 
seen. 

In spite of the fortunate 
predilections that have destined 
him for such widespread popu¬ 
larity, Morris assiduously avoids 
anything patently commercial. 
Even the humor in Morris’ 
dances is offbeat and often inner 
directed, rather than served to 
the audience. It’s up to us to get 
it. While that certainly isn’t 
detrimental to the dances, it puts 
the mainstream audience in the 
position of responding from out¬ 
side its preconceptions. There 
are no sets, costumes tend to be 
practice clothes, and Morris 
favors bare feet; glitz and 
glamour are notably absent from 
the pieces he makes for his own 
company. (His Concanic 3/4 
Studies for the Batsheva Com¬ 
pany was fairly hammy, though, 
and his Esteemed Guests for the 
Jeffrey, with clothes by Santo Lo- 
quasto, fairly glamorous.) 

In what looked like a radical 
departure from his usual demo¬ 


cratic stage picture, Morris ap¬ 
peared as a featured soloist 
against a ten-dancer ensemble in 
Sonata for Clarinet and Piano 
(Poulenc). As a soloist, he allows 
himself a freedom his company 
members never appear to have. 
When Morris behaves like a flam¬ 
ing queen onstage, he appears to 
be acting naturally (and never, 
ever disrespectfully to his music 
or his company). Solos he makes 
for other dancers bear his per¬ 
sonal stamp but are much less 
vivid, as though he hadn’t the 
wish or ability to reveal a per¬ 
sonality other than his own. 

A charmingly enigmatic suite 
called Bijoux (to songs by Eric 
Satie) was danced by Teri 
Weksler, the most beautiful and 
accomplished of Morris’ com¬ 
pany members. A gem of a solo 
on its own terms, it looked as 
though it had been made special¬ 
ly for Weksler. But it couldn’t 
hold a candle to Morris’ own solo 
in Deck of Cards. Dancing to a 
Country-and-Western ballad, 
wearing a simple dress and bare 
feet, his shoulder-length hair fall¬ 
ing free, Morris gave an inspired, 
womanly performance that re¬ 
minded me of Lynn Seymour’s 
dancing in Sir Frederick Ash¬ 
ton’s Five Brahms Waltzes in the 
Manner of Isadora Duncan: 
heavy but graceful. A few people 
giggled in the beginning. But a 
powerful veil of illusion quickly 
descended over us, and the final 
effect was deeply, moving. 

Morris is the only member of 
his company who ever seems to 
have a persona in which sexuali¬ 
ty is an element. Erotic sugges¬ 
tions in his dances are always in 
the form of a joke and, alas, the 
joke is always clever. The audi¬ 
ence member for whom dancing 
is inherently romantic could easi¬ 
ly be put off by Morris’ inatten¬ 
tion to that aspect of life. And I 
suppose awfully conservative 
people might be put off by his fre¬ 
quent outrageousness. 

Outrageous, yes. Vulgar, no. 
Morris draws the line with almost 
clairvoyant savvy, so that I occa¬ 


sionally suspect him of cannily 
playing on contemporary tastes, 
measuring how outrageous he 
will be against his awareness of 
our acceptance and boredom 
levels. Even if I knew that to be 
true, I think I’d admire him just 
as much. It isn’t often that one 
sees dances as well made as these, 
or single-choreographer pro¬ 
grams that offer as much interest 
and variety. When the company 
finally lined up for a bow after 
the final dance—the only bow of 
the evening—and the audience 
screamed, I felt I truly had seen 
the “choreographer of the 
Eighties.” • 


Bettie 

(Continued from previous page) 

Dinah Washington for a brief 
duet, and holds his own quite well 
as a song stylist. 

Blount’s period costumes have 
become more colorful and elabo¬ 
rate over the past year, and her 
performances more powerful. 
The anguish of Billie Holiday 
seems real as Blount performs a 
monologue of Holiday asking her 
mother for money. The brassy, 
sassy Josephine Baker also 
springs to life as Blount sings, 
dances and interplays with the 
audience. 

Blount wisely chooses not to 
impersonate her characters, but 
instead to capture the essence of 
each. Always recognizable as her¬ 
self, she sings her heart out for all 
it’s worth. Each song is perform¬ 
ed in the vocal style of the char¬ 
acter she is playing. Her voice is 
superb, her range astounding. 

A Tribute to the Finest is a 
labor of love for Bettie Blount, a 
woman who has a tremendous 
sense of pride for her cultural 
heritage. It is therefore one of the 
most heartfelt shows in town. 

The show will play at the 
Zephyr Theatre, 25 Van Ness in 
San Francisco, through Nov. 8. 
Call 861-6895. • 



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BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 29 















































Size Isn't Everything 

B ack in the old days (when 
promiscuity ran rampant 
and size queens could 
have their fill), gay men who did 
not possess monstrous genitalia 
had to content themselves with 
the knowledge that size wasn’t 
everything. 

In most instances, the person 
who knew what to do with what¬ 
ever he had could offer someone 
an infinitely more gratifying ex¬ 
perience than the overendowed 
and uninspired stud who, at best, 
would toss his sexual equipment 
over his partner’s shoulder and 
try to burp it toward orgasm. 

Similarly, productions of Puc¬ 
cini’s Tosco come in all shapes 
and sizes. There are overblown 
spectacles like the one Franco 
Zeffirelli has bestowed on the 
Met and mini-Tbsco productions 
like the one recently staged by 
Opera San Jose. There are hot- 
ticket evenings which feature the 
world’s greatest opera singers 
and performances of Tosca 
whose lead artists are relatively 
unknown. 


Soprano Eilana Lappalainen and tenor Keith ikaia Purdy were 
the impassioned lovers in Opera San Jose's production of 
Puccini's Tosca. 


However, truly exciting rendi¬ 
tions of the opera which Joseph 
Kerman once called “Puccini’s 
shabby little shocker’’ are few 
and far between. 

As a critic, one encounters far 
too many performances of Tosca 
which are pathetically mediocre; 
evenings which have nothing ex¬ 
traordinary in the way of musical 
value to offer and little, if any dra¬ 
matic tension. Last month, in less 
than a week’s time, I sat through 
two Bay Area productions of 
Tosca whose contrasts were quite 


remarkable. One offered an in¬ 
tensely exhilarating evening of 
musical theatre; the other was a 
profoundly disturbing dud. 

AH, YOUTH! 

Since retiring from an interna¬ 
tional performing career, mezzo- 
soprano Irene Dalis has been lov¬ 
ingly nurturing Opera San Jose 
through its birth pangs and 
adolescence. Judged on the basis 
of its opening night Tosco, this 
company—which claims a frac¬ 
tion of the musical and financial 
resources of the mighty San Fran¬ 
cisco Opera—is making some 


very impressive progress. 

Opera San Jose performs, with 
supertitles, at the 400-seat Mon¬ 
tgomery Theatre, an auditorium 
whose intimate dimensions are 
perfect for Mozart and chamber 
operas. Because the physical 
demands of Puccini’s Tosca plac¬ 
ed an obvious strain on the thea¬ 
tre’s playing spaces, conductor 
David Rohrbaugh was forced to 
work with a reduced orchestra. 

Director Bill Farlow (who was 
confronted with a postage-stamp- 
sized stage approximately half 
the width of the War Memorial’s) 


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had to find a way in which he 
could mount Puccini’s musical 
melodrama as simply and effec¬ 
tively as possible. 

While the physical dimensions 
of this production (especially 
John Bonard Wilson’s sets) 
demanded a mild suspension of 
disbelief on the part of the audi¬ 
ence, Opera San Jose delivered a 
performance which was musical¬ 
ly impressive and dramatically 
quite thrilling. Even under such 
claustrophobic circumstances, 
Rohrbaugh’s conducting was 
precise and insightful. Bill 
Farlow’s stage direction was 
always clean and logical. 

Although Tosca is hardly the 
standard vehicle in which to en¬ 
counter young singers, the vocal 
health of Opera San Jose’s cast 
quickly became one of its 
strongest assets. Eilana Lap- 
palainen’s Roman diva boasted a 
piercing top register which she 
used to thrilling effect. The 
soprano’s histrionics—especially 
when seen up close—caused my 
friend, Rick Lucas, to remark 
that whenever Lappalainen cross¬ 
ed her eyes she looked just like 
actress Karen Black trying to fly 
an airplane. 

Opera San Jose’s Cavaradossi 
was Keith Ikaia Purdy, a native 
Hawaiian talent who seems 
destined for a major career. 
There is no doubt in my mind 
that Purdy possesses the money 
notes needed to conquer the 
lyricospinto repertoire (there 
were moments when it seemed as 
if he might easily peel the paint 
off the auditorium’s ceiling). Pur¬ 
dy looks good onstage, moves 
well and is as dramatically con¬ 
vincing as any Cavaradossi work¬ 
ing the international circuit to¬ 
day. I wish him a glorious future. 

Nick Lymberis was a surpris¬ 
ingly serious and sympathetic 
Sacristan; Ronald Gerard offered 
a carefully sung Angelotti. Philip 
Olds’ overblown Scarpia may 
have sounded a little bit rough 
around the edges but stalked the 
stage with sufficient malice that 
members of the well-dressed San 
Jose audience could frequently 
be heard hissing his villainy. 

If Opera San Jose’s Tosca was 
any indication of the kind of 
quality alternatives available to 
opera lovers in the Bay Area, 
more people should cancel their 
subscriptions to the San Francis¬ 
co Opera and head for the 
suburbs. Although the price of 
orchestra tickets to the San Fran¬ 
cisco Opera is nearly double that 
charged by Opera San Jose, there 
seems to be an inverse ratio at 
work with regard to the artistic 
quality of their respective pro¬ 
ducts. 

If the first four productions 
of the San Francisco Opera’s 
1987 season are any indication. 
I’d conclude that local audiences 
are simply not getting their 
money’s worth. 

In attempting to analyze the 
perverse factors which con¬ 
tributed to San Francisco 
Opera’s utterly shameful produc¬ 
tion of Tosca, I have pieced 
together the following shreds of 
information. In 1984, when 
Dame Joan Sutherland was taken 
ill during the run of Donizetti’s 
Anna Bolena, soprano Olivia 
Stapp (who had frequently sung 
the title role of Donizetti’s work 
with the New York City Opera) 
was flown into town to substitute 
for the ailing soprano. Such 
favors usually give an artist’s 
management crucial leverage in 
negotiating a return engagement 
and, since La Stupenda almost 
never gets sick, I suspect that 
Columbia Artists had Terry 
McEwen up against a wall. 


Needing an opera which would 
sell plenty of tickets in an other¬ 
wise uneventful fall season, 
McEwen may have opted to make 
Tosca his throwaway productiaij 
for 1987. After all, Puccini’s pot¬ 
boiler always does well at the box 
office {Tosca has been staged 
here in 1970, ’72, ’76, ’78, ’82 
and ’85). Since the chorus and or¬ 
chestra are quite familiar with 
the score, it requires minimal 
rehearsal time. 

Because local audiences have 
been overexposed to Jean-Pierre 
Ponnelle’s Tosca production, 
McEwen decided to rent Pier 
Luigi Pizzi’s sets and Martin 
SchlumpPs costumes from the 
Lyric Opera of Chicago and en¬ 
trusted the directorial duties to 
the San Francisco Opera’s resi¬ 
dent production supervisor Mat¬ 
thew Farruggio (who staged the 
company’s more recent Tosca 
revivals as well as a disastrous 
Lucia Di Lammermoor in 1986). 
Basically, Farruggio is a compe¬ 
tent and unexciting stage direc¬ 
tor whose artistic fee is much 
lower than those charged by his 
colleagues working the interna¬ 
tional circuit. 

I’ll bet that having the San 
Francisco Opera’s former chorus 
director, Richard Bradshaw, on 
the podium didn’t cost McEwen 
too much either. Bradshaw— 
whose poor conducting resulted 
in his being forced to withdraw 
from SFO’s Porgy and Bess pro¬ 
duction last June—certainly 
doesn’t command the same kind 
of financial remuneration as 
world-class maestros like Richard 
Bonynge, Giuseppe Sinopoli or 
Julius Rudel. His work on this 
Tosca (which had precious few 
moments of synchronization be¬ 
tween the musicians onstage and 
those in the pit), exhibited the 
delicacy of an Arctic icebreaker, 
the excitement of a couch potato 
conference and the inherent 
musicianship of a dead geoduck. 

But, as I’ve often been told, 
you get what you pay for. 

Thus, with Tosca held hostage 
in the hands of a dull production 
team, San Francisco’s audiences 
were subjected to one of the most 
lamely acted and musically indif¬ 
ferent productions Puccini’s 
opera has ever known. Six solid¬ 
ly sold (albeit artistically bai^- 
rupt) performances may have 
helped to balance the budget. 
But the production values of this 
Tosca were musically putrid, 
dramatically appalling, profes¬ 
sionally inexcusable and com¬ 
mercially reprehensible. 

Indeed, this Tosca had all the 
inspiration of a child’s paint-by¬ 
numbers illustration. Olivia 
Stapp, who went through the mo¬ 
tions of performing the title role 
with a distrubing lack of commit¬ 
ment, frequently strayed from 
pitch and tempo (at the perform¬ 
ance I attended, the soprano 
could not have jumped off the 
ramparts of the Castel Sant- 
Angelo soon enough). Eric Gar¬ 
rett’s Sacristan mugged shame¬ 
lessly and, at one point in Act II, 
Mark Delavan’s Sciarrone sadn- 
tered lazily across the floor of 
Scarpia’s apartment as if he were 
on his way to the beach. 

As Cavaradossi, Ermanno 
Mauro (no doubt the most expen¬ 
sive line item in the production’s 
budget) made a rare attempt at 
lyricism which sounded more like 
an unhappy tenor whose croon¬ 
ing was a poorly-disguised at¬ 
tempt to cover the growing beat 
in his voice. 

Alain Fondary’s Scarpia was 
functional, undersung and unex¬ 
citing. The most impassioned 
performance came from Monte 
Pederson’s Angelotti. • 


BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 30 






















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BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 32 


November: The Madness Continues 


L ast week was just a warm¬ 
up for things to come in 
the waning days of 1987. 
Wednesday, Oct. 28, some 30 
people gathered at the SF-Eagle 
for the 5th annual pumpkin¬ 
carving competition. Everybody 
who participated did a great job 
on the pumpkins provided by the 
bar, and they were judged in fun¬ 
niest, scariest, and most original 
categories. The winners got $50 
for their efforts and the works of 
art were on display at the spider- 
webbed Eagle all weekend. The 
Cable Car Awards committee for 
Best Theme Decorations were all 
over town too, judging the decor 
in the bars, so watch for the 
nominees in February (the month 
of the Emperor/Empress corona¬ 
tion, Men Behind Bars IV, and 
the Gable Car Awards). 

Thursday, Oct. 29 a big crowd 
was on hand to give a hearty bon 
voyage to Patrick Toner, who is 
leaving us any day now to con¬ 
tinue his education at home in 
Birmingham, Alabama. He 
stayed around long enough to 
vote in the election Tuesday. Be¬ 
cause he got in a car accident 
earlier in the week, Danny 
Williams (He’s O.K.!) couldn’t 
make it, but along with Ms. Joan 
Eva Duarte Peckerhead, we 
managed to introduce a plethora 
of entertainment which included 
Desiree, Deena Jones, Jim Bent¬ 
ley, Gary Brown, Fenemia (Rap 
Sister) Black, and the ever- 
greater Marga Gomez. Lots of 
beer (bust), lots of nostalgia, and 
lots of well-wishing for Patrick, 
who vows he’ll be back in about 
18 months or so. 

Meanwhile, the Halloween 
fever was building up Thursday 
with a few “I just couldn’t waits” 
roaming around town in drag/ 
costumes around Castro, the 
Haight, Polk, and even Folsom. 
But Friday, Oct. 30, people just 
couldn’t contain themselves any 
longer and the SF-Eagle drew a 
humongous crowd for its 6th An¬ 
nual Leather & Feathers com¬ 
petition party. There was lots of 
leather and feathers, alright. 



S.F. Eagle manager, Terry Thompson, took a dare from 
Dorothy Duster (Photo: R. Pruzan) 


Some 50 flawless creations pass¬ 
ed before judges Mark Abramson 
(Men Behind Bars co-producer) 
and the award-winning Peter 
Gudd and John Munn. John and 
Peter decided to take a break this 
year after winning the grand 
prize at the SF-Eagle two years in 
a row and the grand prize for best 
costume at last year’s Beaux Arts 
Ball. They didn’t have an easy 
time of it, I can tell you. The 
cleverness of the costumes and 
the hard work that went into them 
was very evident. 

In the end, contestant #6, the 


Man Dragon, took the grand 
prize; Sister Blanche and her 
Feather Daddies won for the best 
group, and the Best Humor 
award went to “Conchita” who 
couldn’t fit another bangle on 
her costume if she had to. Some 
great ones: Tom Tull as a Nurse; 
Ecstasy, Pain, and Passion, and 
Michael Chase as a splendiferous 
leather eagle. 

On Saturday, make-up clerks, 
wig fixers, and costumers were 
run ragged by last-minute revel¬ 
ers and Saturday night it was 
pure madness from one end of 



It was a mob scene on Castro Street on Halloween 


(Photo: Photo Graphics/Darlene) 
















































Push-pin frenzy at the S.F. Eagle 

(Photo: Photo Graphics/Darlene) 


town to the other. Castro was in¬ 
deed a Disastro Area as hordes 
descended upon the scene to see 
and be seen; Haight Street had 
its share of costumed party-goers, 
and the five-bar Silver Strip com¬ 
petition managed to snag the 
traffic near Church/Market with 
costumes galore traipsing to the 
Mint, Pilsner Inn, Transfer, 
Church St. Station, and the 
Galleon to appear before the 
judges for consideration. Spot¬ 
lights flooded the sky at 8th and 
Brannan as Sanford Kellman’s 
“Knights and Ladies” paraded 
into the Gift Center Pavilion. 

As some half-dozen skeletons 
dressed in Samba costumes gaz¬ 
ed inscrutably down at the crowd 
gyrating below, the Trocadero 
Transfer’s annual Black Party got 
off to an early start. The fabulous 
decorations only added to the 
many black costumes, punctua¬ 
ted by the rebellious ones dress¬ 
ed in snowy white. The music 
sizzled from the beginning, and 
when the 36-member Brazilian 
Troupe hit the stage, it was pure 
bedlam. Dick Collier and his staff 
put on a great Halloween pag¬ 
eant, restating in no uncertain 
terms that the Troc ii without 
peer in the disco world. It was 
great! 

Needless to say, the partying 
went on ’til noon on Sunday with 
the city’s supply of Erase com¬ 
pletely exhausted. 

To add to everything else, the 
49ers literally pulverized the LA 
Rams (booooring, but victorious) 
retaining the lead in their divi¬ 
sion (6-1), capping off a delirious 
weekend. How Sweet It is! 

★ ★ ★ 

B y the time you read this, 
you should be re-grouped, 
re-couped, and ready for 
the coming weekend. Are you 
ready? Photographer Vic Ari- 
mondi opened his studio Nov. 1 
at 952 Rhode Island with stunn¬ 
ing photos hanging on Fridays 
and Saturdays: 1600-1900 on 
Fridays; 1300-1700 on Sundays. 
Call 821-8676 to be sure, until 
Dec. 23. 

Glenn Offield, art director for 
Advocate Men, will be at Beck’s 
Motor Lodge beginning tonight 
until Sunday interviewing 
models for the magazine, so if 
you want to take a stab at inter¬ 
national renown, via the cover or 
the centerfold, call him there for 
an appointment. Models will be 
considered for publication in Ad¬ 
vocate Men from April 1988 on¬ 
ward. 

All this weekend, too, the Inter¬ 
national Gay Bowling Organiza¬ 
tion (IGBO) will draw some 300 
bowlers from all over the U.S. for 
its big tournament with lots of ac¬ 
tion and lots of prizes at Castle 
Lanes. Besides the reception and 
other mixers, the post tourna¬ 


ment Tea Dance at Dreamland on 
Sunday at 2200 hours will culmi¬ 
nate the weekend tournament. 
This info is provided by and 
authorized by Richard McPher¬ 
son, the B.A.R.’s bowling cor¬ 
respondent. 

Saturday night the biggie for 
leather men is the 2nd Annual 
Mr. South of Market Contest at 
Trocadero Transfer. The doors 
open at 2000 hours and the ac¬ 
tion starts at 2100. Every South 
of Market bar has a contestant 
entered, and there’ll be a lot of 
hot items auctioned off. Bob 
Marquette and his daughter 
Maralee will sing solos and duets, 
and Pierre Nadeau, the death- 
defying trapeze artist, will per¬ 
form. You can still enter the com¬ 
petition with application forms 
available at the SF-Eagle, The 
Powerhouse, the Rawhide, and 
the Endup. The show will be 
MCd by Michael Chase and 
Brian Berger, and the ducats are 
only $8 at the door. It’s a benefit 
for the AIDS Emergency Fund 
and the judges include non¬ 
leather personalities (Wayne Fri¬ 
day and Danny Williams). It 
should be most interesting. 

Saturday afternoon, all bar¬ 
tenders should heed the Open 
Call for Men Behind Bars IV. The 
auditions begin at 1230 hours at 
the Jon Sims Center for the Per¬ 
forming Arts, 1519 Mission. If 
you want more info, call 863-8035 
or Jim Cvitanich at 621-6476. 
Here’s a chance for bartenders 
with talent, torso, and long-term 
commitment attitudes to get in 
on the action. Don’t be left out! 
Think of what it means for your 
bar, honies! 

If you survive the bowling ac¬ 
tion, MBB tryouts, or auditions 
for Advocate Men on Saturday, 
there’s only one place to be on 
Sunday, Nov. 8. It’s the 22nd An¬ 
nual CMC Carnival. The big 
event takes place from noon to 
2000 hours at 240 Golden Gate 
Ave. (the SEIU Union Hall). 
There’ll be booths galore, lots of 
hot men (leather and otherwise), 
and the annual Mr. Carnival Con¬ 
test. Tickets are $8 in advance 
and $10 at the door and are avail¬ 
able at Headlines, SF-Eagle, 
Kimo’s, Mint, Village, Mr. S 
Leathers, and the Kokpit. Don’t 
miss this one! If you want to enter 
the Mr. Carnival competition or 
rent a booth call 626-1805 or 
282-5955. See you there! 

If none of the above appeals to 
you, you might march right over 
to Le Salon and get the latest 
Demetri release of Paradise Park, 
a 90-minute sizzler with Nick 
Dallas, Timmy Greer, Jason 
Steele, and Paul Cannon—it’s a 
video about men who frequent 
big-city parks and the fun found 
therein. 

Or, if you’ve not yet had 
(Continued on next page) 




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BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5. 1987 PAGE 33 






































— what is it — 





Leather Daddy's Boy '86 James Buhler (1.) as Bernadette 
Peters, with Michael Chase. (Photo: R. Pruzan) 


Marcus 

iContiiiued from previous page) 
enough drag, you can attend Ms. 
Tatiana’s first Saturday of the 
month drag show at Kimo’s Sat¬ 


urday night, beginning at 2100. 
The dowager emperor Ken 
Wright is listed as one of the stars 
of the Imperial Family of SF 
show, along with former Em¬ 
presses Jonni, Ginger, Connie, 
Sissy and Sable. Add Ms. Gladys 


AUDITIONS 

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Patrick Toner got a little carried away with the eyelashes 

(Photo: R. Pruzan) 


in an effort to save his marriage, 
the Detroit man’s lover sent the 
local dude an 8 X10" scarlet let¬ 
ter: A. 

Another question around 
town: What flower shop is for sale 
north of Market for some 
$60,000 and it hasn’t even been 
open a year? 

And what local gad-about is 
stirring so much shit in Seattle, 
Chicago, Washington, New York, 
and other leather communities 
they’re calling me and asking: 
“Who is She? Who does she 
hope to be? and Can’t you keep 
her chained up there in SF?” All 
I know is he’s flying all over but 
can’t pay his rent! This one is 
making SF’s leather community 
look bad—real bad! 

While the Cal Eagles M/C 
have women in their club and the 
Warlocks M/C used to have a 
women’s auxiliary, the new ordi¬ 
nance pending before the Board 
of Supes that forbids private 
clubs from admitting women and 
minorities has got several women 
ready to pounce on some of the 
clubs in our community for ad¬ 
mission and membership! You 
read it here first. 


You also read here first where 
all the former employees of a cer¬ 
tain Market St. all-night restau¬ 
rant who were fired in yesteryears 
gathered to have a re-union in a 
place bursting at the seams. 
Needless to say, they were all real 
cute and burned several owners 
in effigy! Cute. 

If your leather and your atti¬ 
tude aren’t quite cutting it in the 
leather department or you think 
you need just that “right” accou¬ 
trement, you should check out 
Mercury Mail Order’s new retail 
store upstairs from the Village 
Bar. The hottest new item there 
is a Swagger Strap. It’s kind of a 
short belt with a leather handle 
that can clip to your leather pants 
loop (right or left, but preferably 
left!). It is definitely a hot new 
item, and if you’re just so-so or 
lukewarm, you need it! 

Hey boys and girls, have fun 
this weekend. Hope to see you at 
the Mr. South of Market Contest 
and the CMC Carnival. ’Til then, 
keep your legs crossed, stay out 
of the bushes, and discourage 
your leather friends from getting 
in drag. It could lead to a drag 
title! • 


Bumps (She’s great!) and it 
sounds like a helluva show! 


THE DISH RAN AWAY 
WITH THE BROOM 


Dorothy Duster is an example 
of a good man who will never rest. 
You’re all invited on Thursday, 
Nov. 12, to watch Dorothy pre¬ 
miere her new personal line of 
perfume. It’s called “Le Piu” (no 
relation to stink), a unisex col¬ 
ogne. It goes on sale promptly at 
1900 hours and the proceeds will 
benefit Open Hand. It all takes 
place at The Village Bar. This 
should be fun, and think of the 
smell you can raise! 

The stock market shenanigans 
and the mayoral campaign bitchi¬ 
ness were the only bad things 
about last week. The new name 
for Santa Clara’s transit group 
was revealed last week: S.C.A.'T. 
which indicates some queen was 
in on the naming. 

And questions, questions usu¬ 
ally without answers: Which bar 
had a pumpkin carving competi¬ 
tion, only you had to furnish your 
own pumpkins? 

And as I was running to catch 
the 24 Diviz the other day, Joe 
Scarpello grabbed me to advise 
that the credit manager at the 
Advocate has the dubious name 
of Jerry Pitts! 

When asked about the longevi¬ 
ty of his marriage to Nick Vera- 
takis. Chuck Brigance at the SF- 
Eagle hissed: “He pays my bills 
and I keep him happy!” — in 
other words they’re financial 
partners! 

Another dude met a man from 
Detroit last summer and was so 
enamored, the marriage of the 
Detroit man is on the rocks and 




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BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 34 











































A man and his Teddy at the pajama party at Dreamland 

(Photo: Rink) 


A wedding party of one at the Giftcenter (Photo: Rink) 


of the Mint, will be having a gala 
grand opening celebration on the 
21st of this month. Watch for 
your invitation in the mail, or 
more details here. Also, you might 
be able to get more details on 
what Stanley Boyd is up to in 
1988. It just might be the 
counterpart of what Deena Jones 
is up to for ’88. 

I know you are thinking that in 
my last column I bemoaned the 


fact that someone had left me in 
the dark about a few details I 
thought I should have known. 
Tough! I think we all should 
brush up on the talent of reading 
between the lines occasionally. 

Back to Deena Jones, who has 
been enjoying much success be¬ 
ing the Hostess with the Mostess 
for the Endup’s Thursday night 
shows. Yes, I said Thursday, as in 

(Continued on next page) 


Of Halloween And Other Extravaganzas 


will receive a drink compliments 
of the Mint and there will also be 


a 50/50 raffle and various other 
prizes raffled off during the 
course of the evening. The 
monies will go to the Godfather 
Service Fund, the party starts at 
8 p.m., and they are always a hoot! 

Vic and Eddie, the new owners 


“My girlfriend’s gone and I’m homy.” 


Call 976'RODS 

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We’ll suck you 
into an orgy 
of sexual trips 
like you’ve never 
heard before 


Does alley sleaze interest you? 

Are you into master and siave trips? 
Cruised a dirty book store iately? 
Sweat in the iocker room turn you on? 
Ail this and much, much more! 


DIAL 

415 


976 


$2.00 PLUS TOLL IF ANY 
MINORS PROHIBITED. 


H ooray for Halloween was 
not exactly what everyone 
was saying this year. 
Some were even heard to say that 
it was a bit apathetic and some¬ 
what uninspired, a feeling I will 
have to go along with. Don’t get 
me wrong. You all know my 
goody-goody side will take over 
and manage to come up with a 
few bright spots of the weekend, 
regardless of how deep I have to 
dig. 

Reports from Polk Street say it 
was quiet there, while they say it 
was a bit scary, at times, in the 
Castro. That, of course, is due to 
the fact that the parties respon¬ 
sible for the trouble on Polk 
Street are now going over to the 
Castro, and we don’t have to 
name names here, do we! 

Anyway, that’s one more Hal¬ 
loween under our belts, and a 
year left to plan next year’s mer¬ 
rymaking and glamour. One new 
party that was a welcome addi¬ 


tion was the Silver Strip costume 
contest, which involved the Mint, 
Galleon, Eagle Creek, Transfer, 
Pilsner, and the Hideaway, with 
the contestants having to be judg¬ 
ed at all six bars before the stroke 
of midnight. The winners from 
tlie contest were David Reavis, 
with his very clever Miss Mount 
Rushmore costume, and the 
group who portrayed characters 
from the Wizard of Oz, with close 
attention payed to detail. 

The Oz group was also the win¬ 
ner of the group category at the 
Mint, where I was playing David 
Letterman to the more than 50 
contestants who paraded through 
that evening. The winner in the 
male category was David Purcell 
with his flawless Phantom cos¬ 
tume, and the winner in the 
female category was Hazel, who 
we still haven’t got ahold of yet. 

Next up at the Mint is the mon¬ 
thly zodiac party this Tuesday for 
all you Scorpios out there. You 


BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 35 

































is a mere $3 cover charge. The 
Endup was also the scene of a lit¬ 
tle fun Sunday morning when 
Dexter Devoe of Beachblanket 
fame accidentally decided to go 
swimming in the patio fountain, 
which luckily was unoccupied at 
the time. Dexter being the 
trouper that he is, carried on. 

This Saturday evening will be 
the second Mr. South of Market 
contest, a benefit for the AIDS 
Emergency Fund, and it will be 
held at the Trocadero Transfer, 
520 4th St., with the doors open¬ 
ing at 8:15 p.m. and the show 
starting at 9 p.m. The MCs for 
this event are calendar men from 
the Eagle, from the ’87 and ’88 
calendars, Mike Chase and Brian 
Berger. Guest judges will include 
Wayne Friday and Danny Wil¬ 
liams, if Danny is feeling up to it 
after his recent car accident that 
has put his back out of whack. 
(Thank goodness for cute chiro¬ 
practors.) There will be an auc¬ 
tion of fabulous merchandise, 
and they could always use more, 
which you might donate by call¬ 
ing Alan Selby at 863-7764. Don’t 
worry, you can bring your Master- 
Card and Visa, and checks will be 
accepted. They have some great 
entertainment lined up for the 
evening, and you can also stay 
after and party ’til the wee hours 
at the Troc. 

Most of you have already heard 
that Robert (Boo) Hubley passed 
away on the 26th of October, and 
many of you worked for him at 
one of the bars he was involved 
with, including 18 years at the 
New Bell. Boo was my friend and 
was always there when I or the 
community needed him. He will 
be missed. 

What Christmas season would 
be complete without me taking 
on a few projects for the holidays? 
This year will be no exception. I 
have two on the fire, the first one 
being with the Godfather Service 
Fund, which I have to find at least 
six sponsors, at $50 each, to pay 
for the buying of plants for the 
many AIDS patients who will be 
in the hospital over the Christ¬ 
mas season. The sponsor’s name 
will be included on the Xmas 
card accompanying the plant. 
Also, the Mint, Emperor Patrick, 
Empress Tina, and myself will 
hold a Christmas Plant Auction 
at the Mint Sunday, Dec. 13, with 
the proceeds going to Open 
Hand. If you would like to help 
out in any way for either of these 
projects, and it will be apprecia¬ 
ted, you can do so by calling me 
at 431-3470. 

Two forthcoming items I must 
plug, before I get on to the “you 
knew it was coming” Portland 
dish, are as follows. Tuesday, Nov. 
10, will be the final auditions for 
“Puttin’ on the Titz,” the 
fabulous new show that will 
premiere at Sutters Mill in 
December. This audition is for 
female impersonators, live or 
pantomime, and will start at 8 


Dorothy crashed at the Halloween party at the Giftcenter 

(Photo: S. Martin) 


p.m. at the Mill. A forthcoming 
event of importance will be held 
Thursday, Nov. 12, when Miss 
Dorothy Duster will premiere her 
personal line of fragrance, “La 
Pue,” at the Village, with the fun 
starting at 7 p.m. as a benefit for 
Open Hand. 

The Western Star Dancers var¬ 
iety show, Club La Star, will be 
held Saturday, Nov. 14, at the 
Central Y.M.C.A. with the doors 
opening at 7:15 p.m. and the show 
starting at 8 p.m. For more info, 
call Jason Fontaine at 421-1790. 

I sure had lots of copy this 
week, but when it rains it pours, 
and speaking of rain, they final¬ 
ly got some in Portland, where 
they were having a record 
drought. Wasn’t that tricky how 
I eased right into the subject? I 


have decided I will not give up all 
details at once, but sprinkle them 
in future columns so at least I 
know the kids in Portland will 
have a reason to glance at my col¬ 
umn occasionally. Everyone told 
me what a beautiful city Portland 
is, and I will have to agree with 
them. My goodness, the only 
trash on the streets was me, and 
that didn’t count. The people 
were certainly very friendly, 
which gave me the chance to cozy 
up to a few. Some of my favorites 
were Dora Jar and Fred, the new 
Empress Pearl, the new Emperor 
Karen, and many more. Thanks 
to Lucy for your hospitality. Also 
to Kelisha, Rona, and Judy, who 
got me tanked up. To all in Port¬ 
land I send my thanks for your 
hospitality! Let’s do lunch! • 


Karl's Calendar 


Compiled by Diedre 


THURSDAY 11/5 

Feathers N Flesh Revue, 
N’ Touch, 10 p.m., MC Desiree. 

FRIDAY 11/6 

4th Anniversary Party, 
Kokpit, 8 p.m., all-star revue, MC 
Grand Duchess Flame 8-10 p.m.. 
Empress Tina Tanner 10 p.m.- 
12 a.m,, Sean Erickson and Dean 
Johnson with the Campus Thea¬ 
tre Varsity Squad 12 a.m.-2 a.m. 

Ginger St. John Revue, 
Kimo’s, shows 9:30 and 11 p.m. 

SATURDAY 11/7 

4th Anniversary Party 
Cont., Kokpit, special drink 
prices all day, buffet by Mama 
Billy in the evening. 

Autumn Afternoon Ball, 
Transfer, 3-6 p.m., $7, beer bash 
with food, hostess First Ladies 
United, benefit Forum Christmas 
Party. 

Second Mr. South of Mar¬ 
ket Contest, Trocadero Trans¬ 
fer, doors open 8:15 p.m., starts 
9 p.m., $8, MC S.F. Eagle Calen¬ 


dar Men, guest judges, auction 
and entertainment. 

Tatiana’s 1st Saturday 
Show, Kimo’s, 9 p.m., $5 dona¬ 
tion, Imperial family to perform. 

SUNDAY 11/8 

CMC Carnival, S.E.I.U. HalL 
240 Golden Gate Ave., 2-8 p.m., 
$8 advance, $10 at door, fun and 
games. 

Employees Beer Bust, S.F. 
Eagle, 3-6 p.m., $7. 

4th Anniversary Party 
Cont., Kokpit, 4 p.m., 5,000 
tournament, $10 entry, cash 
prizes 1st, 2nd, and 3rd, comp, 
drinks, drinks to all players, 
special drink prices. 

TUESDAY 11/10 

Scorpio Birthday Party, 
Mint, 8 p.m., benefit (Jodfather 
Service Fund. 

THURSDAY 11/12 

Parfum “Le Piu” Party, 

Village, 7 p.m., hostess Dorothy 
Duster, benefit Open Hand. • 


And then there were those who celebrated Halloween early at Bingo (Photo: S. Martin) 


Two Simultaneous 3 Hour Programs on 
Two Big Screens — Films Change 
Sunday and Thursday 

BEST Gay Hardcore Erotic Films 
Anywhere — Bar None! Safe Sex Is Hot! 

FIRST RUNS — GRAND PRIX EXCLUSIVES 

Members do their own live J/0 Show 
Every Day in the Circle J Room! 




369 ELLIS ST. 
474-6995 

OPEN 11-11 
DAILY 

ADONIS VIDEO 
UPSTAIRS 


Mideo 


25 DIFFERENT 60-MINUTE 
J/0 VIDEOTAPES 

Transferred to tape from private 
film collection. Dozens of hunky 
young models, huge equipment, 
great blastoffs every 5 or 6 minutes! 
Good image, good color, soft rock 
music. All safe sex! Let these videos 
on your VCR become your favorite 


home companion! Sorry, no bro¬ 
chures or stills on these. But look 
into this bargain collection. Each 
$24.95 plus tax. VHS in stock. Beta 
made up on order. Ask for Adonis 
Cockplay series. ADONIS VIDEO, 369 
Ellis, San Francisco 94102. (415) 
474-6995. Open Noon - 6 pm daily. 
Upstairs over Circle J Cinema. See 
Hal Call. M/C-Visa OK. 


Friese 

(Continued from previous page) 

tonight, and the show there this 
evening will feature, in addition 


to Miss Jones, Fire Eater Sando 
Counts, comedian Sandy Van, 
and some very gifted male strip¬ 
pers for your enjoyment. The 
show starts at 10 p.m., and there 


BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 36 

























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BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 





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Bo/Sio[So [PEOPLE & [PERSONALS 



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FEISTY 

ECLECTIC 

THOUGHT-PROVOKING 
THE BAY AREA REPORTER 
ONCE A WEEK 

B.A.R. SUBSCRIPTION 
FORM 

1528 15th Street 
San Francisco, CA 94103 


CITY _ 
STATE_ 


26 Issues $35.00 
52 Issues $65.00 




Glory Hole Hotline 621-1887 
E53 

n TR aVs n* n. n; n. • 

EARTHQUAKE HOMELESS 
GWM 37 sks $ donations. 
Lost everything. Thanks. 

Tom Lovelace, 6520 Selma, 
Hollywood, CA 90028. 


Secret Gospel Church 

Ancient Phallic Rites of Gnostic 
Christianity -. An orgy of Brotherly 
Love. Males 18 & older welcome. 

Info & Schedule: 552-7339 


PWA's 

Diagnosed 6 months or longer 
are needed to participate in a 
scientific study to learn more 
about what affect AIDS has on 
sexual expression, needs and 
feelings. Participation will include 
a one-time-only confidential inter¬ 
view. For further information, 
phone 863-8834. 

_^ 

PRIVATE FRENCH CLASSES 
BE CLEAR/SPEECH 
FLUENCY. PROFESSIONAL 
CLASSES W/NATIVE 
ALL IN FRENCH! 

ARE YOU READY? 

A BIENTOT. 

626-1753 

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A QUANTUM LEAP 

in communication technology 
enhances love, sex and 
friendship for only 83c a 
day. Gay Men's Hotline 
Network free local calls: 
Community Access: 978-9349 
Electronic Baths: 978-9288 
Electronic Glory Hole: 978-9338 
Lovers Hotline: 978-9277 
Electric Gay Lib: 978-9356 
Gay Health Hotline: 978-9287 
The Gay Men's Hotline 
415-681-LOVE 

E45 


INCHES. . . 

Why not lose some! Brand 
new to always tan and trim 
high speed bed $11.00, low 
speed $4.00 on packages. 
Special prices 626-8505 

__^ 

47 GWM seeks clean cut guy 
int. in dining out trav. 
etc. financial aid poss. Reply 
w/foto Box #73 BAR 1528 15th 
St. S.F. CA 94103 

E45 

*FREE* GAY MEN 
INTROS 956-7277 


Daddy 30 will train 
young trim boy in the art 
of obedience thru bondage 
and discipline. Tom 647-7695. 


MASTER & SLAVE AUCTION 

Feed the hungry by donating yourself as 
master or slave for a night. See auctioneer at 
Gay Rescue Mission suction, Watering Hole, 
1st Sat. each month 3 to 6 PM. Also need por¬ 
no tapes books mags leather S&M gear any¬ 
thing auctionabla Bring along or drop off at 
Mission 1080 Folsom. 431-8748 


- GAY SHELTER - 

A shared room, all meals and im¬ 
mediate work is available now at 
the U.S. Mission. 2 locations: 
788 O'Farrell & 86 Golden Gate, 
or call 775-5866 or 775-6446. 


SUPERSTAR 

Video 



THf BIGGEST 6. BEST 
MALE HARD CORE! 

VtR : f.’CVlES IN STOCK) 


/A personalized 
introduction service. 
You choose from the Bay Area 
most eligible gay/lesbian singles. 

(415) 777-1748 


SELECTIVE 

INTRODaCTIONS 

Increase the odds of finding your ideal 
person with reliable telephone 
introductions. Just listen to the 
hundreds of recorded messages and 
pick the best one. It works! 

Leave your own FREE MESSAGL.^ 
n the privacy of your home. 



WHEN YOU GO HOME TONIGHT 
MAKE A CALL TO: 


(413) 

(213) 


976-BARS 

VmERE MEN MEET MENU! 


HAPPY HOUR 6 pm • 3 am 


MAKE A CALL - MEET A FRIEND 


WHEN IT’S TIME 
FOR THAT 
SPECIAL GUY 


Quality relationships 
for quality men 
since 1974 

SAN KKANt lSt <) 

(415) 863-9550 


(408) 988-1499 




effective, exclusive, discreet.. 





Kendall S. Pise Call 
David (213) 469-9404 


E45 


Stay Informad 
with B.fI.R. 

Bottom Daddy 
Gdikg, hot, guy digs gdikg 
dudes 20-40's who like to 
take charge. Tom 771-8011 


Gay X-C Ski Club 931-1158 

^ 

Atr 64 W/M sks ongoing rel 
with serious 18-45 son, slave, 
friend/lover. 495 Ellis St. 
#1104, S.F. 94102 

E45 


SRF€ S€X & J/O 

Ploy SoPely M, groups, phone Si 
oihen troveling. Meet heolthy 
horny men for hot oction in Colif. 

Notionuuide. UUrite: CKC, PO. Box 
330484 Miami, FL 33233 


ANNOUNCING 

976I3UIS 

MESSAGE NETWORK 

-The intelligent way to 
meet new buddies. 

-24 hour service. 

-Messages change 3 
times a day. 

-Your personal 
message FREE. 


$2, & toll, if any. 


SCULPTURE 

Crotch Trim & Ball Shave 
$10 Tom 285-4196 


Foot Guys 

The New Club for Guys Into 
Hot Boots, Shoes, Feet, Sox 
Sneakers & Clothing. 

Send SASE for info to: AM, 
POB 786, San Fran CA 94101 

^^ 

MASCULINE G/W/M 29 YO 
6'4" 230 moust. Vers gdiks 
Fr/Gk wants G/M 18-35 gdik 
vers, clean (408) 266-1581 

_^ 

Horny? Y Pay $2 for 2 min. 
on a 976 # when u can call 
me anytime 4 free. 431-7186. 

E46 


JACK-OFF CLUB 

Mystic Circle strictly J/D Club meets 
Thursdays & Saturdays 7:30 PM, 1080 
Folsom. No one admitted otter 10 PM. 
Mandatory clothes check, $5 dona¬ 
tion. Call tor inlormation on other 
events 431 - 8748 . 


Psychic Constatant 

Palm & tarot card readings by 
Christina, S.Frs foremost reader 
and advisor. Gives advice on all 
all matters of life. All consulta¬ 
tions confidential. $10 with this 
ad. 863-5993. 201 Sanchez. S.F. 


TENNIS/SKI BUDDY 

Athletic, prof GWM 5'10", 
155# seeks GAM or GWM, 30's, 
for Tennis/Ski buddy. For 
Fun! Tennis: Novice but no 
wimp. Skiing: Intermed. Write: 
w/Ph# Michael, Box 260, 
2440 16th St. SF 94103 

E45 

GWM BB top into CB/T call 
Mike 759-6575 

E45 


S&M MEET YOUR MATCH 

Rough, raunchy, top, bottom, master, 
slave, daddy, boy, lockerroom? Meet 
your sex-match NOW! 1000's of 
private, one-on-one, phonemates. No 
phone bill but Ing/dst. Call 

(415) 346-75150W! 


CLEAN-ALTER-REPAIR-CUSTOM 

LEATHER 

THE JACKET SHOP 
1795 MARKET at OCTAVIA 

621-6672 


FINDING THE RIGHT MAN 

1 Day Workshop $25 
Saturday, Nov. 21 
For men wanting a life partner 

PAKTNEKS INSTITUTE 
343-8541 


Loving, gay man, not rich seeks 
helpful honest male lover under 
40, to share my yacht near Val¬ 
lejo. Jim (415) 787-1681 or write 
P.O. Box 7206, Vallejo. 94590 

_^ 

Gay Men's Sketch Class—$10 
Tue/301 8th 7 p.m.-621-6294 

^ 

Baja California 
Looking for Traveling 
Companion leaving Nov. 14 
214 weeks camping 822-4482 
Serious Calls Only 

^ 

I like to screw —safe. Tom 
495 Ellis #2378 SF 94102 

E45 

PSYCHIC READINGS 

One Free Question 
568-5472 6 to 10 pm 

__^ 

Sexy, masc GWM, trim body, 
30's, ex clean sks, short, chubby 
GWM (under 5'10" & 200#) 
into rimming, butt play, 

J/O in the shower. Open to 
scat fantasies too. Write 
w/Ph # Mark, Box 260, 2440 
16th St., SF 94103 

^ 

UC/DVC STUDENTS 

Walnut Creek exec, 40, sks 
intimate friendship with 
Asian, Latin or Cauc G/M 
UC or DVC student who is 
sincere, honest, stable 
short, slim, smooth, cute 
boyish gdiks. Housing, 
other assistance possible 
for right guy. Call Kent, 
944-9069 eves or wkends. 

E45 

Downtown Head. 771-2154 

^ 

JOHN (ASIAN) AT D.C. 

We met at Rally. I'm Kent, 
Advocate Photographer, and 
want to talk. (213) 876-9898 

E45 


Piercing Clinics w/Jim 
Ward - Noon - 5 PM -11 /14 
Mr S 227 7th 863-7764 
11/15 Image Leather 2199 Market 
621-7551. Appt req.-privacy 
assured. Proper Hygiene 

E46 


Reunion 

Wherever You Are! 

For All Ex-Stud-Academy 
Employees & Friends 
Buffet-Button-Show-Raffle 
Friday-Nov 27 at the Stud 
4216 Melrose Los Angeles 
213-660-0889 

E45 

S/M ongoing RRiver-Rap 
support plus (707) 887-2697 

__ E45 

Comp/Pro BB's —Like to 
Show it Off? 759-6575 

__^ 

Free massage & B.J. for yng 
students. E. Bay Tim 658-5878. 

E45 

Cocksuckrng Orgy 431-8748 

^ 

Hot spanking for trim 18-25 
yr Asian or Latin shy/ 
inexper OK 408-379-2684 

E48 


GAY 

TELEPHONE 
BULLETIN BOARD 
INSTANTLY UPDATED 
LEAVE ADULT 
MESSAGES 
SEE IF THERE’S ONE 
FOR YOU 

( 415 ) 976-6677 

$2.00 Plus Toll If Any 


BLONDE CANADIAN 



A professional full massage 
$40/ln $50/Out 
RON 775-7057 


IT'S NICE TO 
BE KNEADED ^ 

by an exceptionally good 
looking blond gymnast. Out 
only. 550-6833 Steven $40 


• CASTRO MASSAGE • 

Young handsome student 
with magic fingers. 90 minutes 
you'll never forget. 

$45. Body Electric Certified 
Phil: 864-0649 

_^ 

In Oakland Daily After 
4:30 PM Mark 261-3319 


VERY HOT BLACK MASSEUR 
Out Calls Only. $40.00 Walt 
986-4400 #502 8 AM-Midnight 

^ 

REAL MASSAGE 

Complete erotic & sensual 
Mike handsome masculine 
beautiful nude build, 6' 

172, 34 $50-$65 863-6947 

__^ 

Relaxing massage certified 
Todd 753*5131 • 24 hrs. 


SUPERB MASSEUR 

and Bodybuilder 
Adept in the art of making bodies 
feel relaxed, light and yet energiz¬ 
ed. Loving hands and energy 
iy 2 hours $45 In / $55 out 
9 AM - 9 PM 
Sandeha 864-2883 

E49 


BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 38 

































































































































Fantastic Massage by an Old Pro 
$30, Roy 621-1302 

E45 


Complete Massage 
Chuck 661-1832 $30 in/out 

E49 


Nude athlete. Massage $40. 
Kevin 285-6542 super time. 

E45 


NUDE HOT HANDSOME 

$40 282-3733 24 Hours 

E45 


Complete mass, by hndsme guy. 
Dwntwn SF 885-1558 Mark 24hr 
E45 

See Yourself Bondassaged! 

In a Mirrored Playroom. 
Bondassage = Bondage -t- Erotic 
Massage. Jack 680-8959 E45 

Fullbody massage by nude body¬ 
builder, 34, 5'5", 42"c, 16"a. 
Older men welcome. Fine body. 
$40 out, Don 441-2584 E45 

Certified Asian Masseur 
Relaxing $40/$50 441-2149 
E51 



Hot Oil Massage by body builder 
Gino 861-0294 

E47 


**‘Anytime You Want It*** 
Hot coconut oil applied by 
my trained hands will float 
you away to ecstasy. Only $35 
for 90 mins. Larry 621-8560 

^ 

NORDIC MASSAGE 

Out Calls $35.00 
Thor 861-2231 • 9 AM - 9 PM 

^ 

Pamper Yourself-Reduce Stress 
Expert Massage 
Special Daytime Rates 
Neil Lasky 647-0591 Cert 

_^ 

S.Mateo (570-5216) Frank $40 in 


E45 



TOM 


ADVENTURESOME 

Built tight, muscular & hung. 
Very friendly gentlemen 
over 30 preferred. 
Sensual massage in the buff. 
$40 in $60 out 24 hrs. 

567-4572 


ALL THE EXTRAS! 

Massage by Extra Nice, 

Extra Hung, Young Man. 
In/Out, Days/Eves by J.J. 

979-5740 

__^ 

Pleasure plus Nurturing 
nude pro massage 861-0843 

^ 

Black Buck 6'0"—8" thick hot 
massage + more Rob 863-5702 
__E45 

Nude muse. BB massages only 
the parts that really 
count. 5'9", 160#, 8" cut, 
smooth, 28. SF calls only. 

928-5826. Call back 
required. 50 in/60 out Ken 

E48 


A NATURAL MAN 

Gives an erotic massage 
Hndsm, muse, masculine, hung. 
Strong but sensitive, healthy. 
Andy 24 hrs. (415) 864-6097 

E46 

Nude massage in Davis by 
handsome B.B., 50 anytime 
(916) 756-8120 Norv $30 

E46 


Massage. Feels great $40 
non-sexual 285-6542 Kyle 

E45 


REAL HOT MAN 

5'11", 170#, bik hair, blue eyes, 
gdikg., BB, massage. Call Jim 
564-7796 • Certified • E46 


★ ★ ★PHILLIPS ★ ★ 

Good natured model- 
masseur. Handsome, 
clean-cut and discreet. 

864-5566 



Relax & enjoy a hot tub & 
massage Michael 753-0687 
E45 


Erotic, safe Roy 593-4336 

E48 

Caring bIk masseur Mr G 
hung uncut sensuous $30 hr 
6 ft-180-41 -621-3319-top aft 
5 p.m.-weekdays all day Sat-Sun 
E46 


ED WILEY 

FULL BODY MASSAGE 
Avail. Russian River - In 
Out Calls - Greater Bay 
Area 707-887-9343 

E45 


PAMPER YOURSELF 

Loving Massage by 2 Men 
Michael/Chris 753-0687 

E46 


I Promise A Quality 
Professional Massage 



75 min. • $45 ln/$65 Out 
2 hours • $65 ln/$80 Out 
Combination Esalen Swedish 
& Shiatsu Massage 


MAN TO MAN 

Hot, Handsome, Friendly 
Full Body Massage 
. 24Hr/$60, . , 

Wes 885-1837 9»7-7675 bpr 


THE HE8LING TOUCH 

Strong, sensitive, healing hands are look¬ 
ing to care for you. The blend of Deep and 
Light Swedish, Shiatsu/Acupressure and 
Body Mobilization Techniques are ac¬ 
cented with Reiki energy work to make 
you feel rejuvenated. My work is adjusted 
to suit your particular needs. Absolutely 
Professional and non-sexual. I have two 
S.F. office locations to serve you. Outcalls 
by request. (Call for special mtro offer) 

Terry Conner (415) 647-6440 


BEST BYz" IN S.F. 

Smart nude masseur 
build, gdikg man, tall blonde 
blue, gobs of fun, safe. Bi. 
table —atmosphere $40 in 
885-6309 anytime 

E45 


THINK BIG 

"Danish Built" 

6', 180# 

Blue Eyed, Masculine Beauty 
Hard Chiseled Body 
Hung, Tantalizing 9" 

Extra Handsome, 
Always a Top Man 

Nude Erotic Massage 
$50 in *$70 Out 
Friendly & Fun Man 

Horst 931-0309 


BLACK MAGIC!!! 

Rock solid Bik BB for 
sensual massage call Dick 
in/out eves 285-1903 

E45 


8" UNCUT ITALIAN 

Nude/Relaxed Massage 
Frank 552-2509 

E45 


Treat yourself— Nurturing 
Massage Michael 753-0687 

E45 

Husky Blonde Bl-eyed Dad 
Swedish massage out call 
Bill 863-3716 before 12 p.m. 

E45 


You'll Melt Under My 

SUPERB HANDS 

18th & Noe. Certified. And 
only $30. Jim 864-2430. 

E45 


n/viMR Mnssnee 

Enjoy the nurturing and revitalizing effect of 
touch through this form of traditional Japanese 
bodywork. AMMA uses no oils, can be done 
clothed, and is effective in reducing physical 
and emotional stress. Treat yourself I Certified. 

NONSEXURL • 75 minutes $20 
_John 626-1569_ 


Blond Swimmer 

MONTANA MAN 

You Get Reenergized 
$45 Ted 626-1925 

E45 

NEW HANDSOME YOUNG 
Sensual * Healing * Nude 
$40/$50 24 hours 771-3817 
E45 


BODYWORK/SPORTSMASSAGE 

Competitive swimmer and runner offers 
bodywork for chronic pain-, injuries, stress 
management, or just to feel wonderful! 

MEMBER A.M.T.A. • $35/HR • NON-SEXUAL 


|EFF GIBSON, CMT • 626-7095 



SCOTT (415) 621 •7646 


NURTURING MASSAGE 
BY SKILLED PROFESSIONAL 
$40/90 MIN.•NON-SEXUAL 

HOLIDAY GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE 



CUS $25/90 MIN ^ 


DAVID 861^362 

A warm, loving masseur. 
Relax & enjoy a slow, deep and 
sensual massage anytime. 
Your place or mine. 



SENSUAL MASSAGE 
$50 90 MIN. 

MAX 821-2351 



SWEDISH/SHIATSU MASSEUR 
SPECIALIZING IN THERAPY 
FOR ATHLETES. CERTIFIED. 
AVAILABLE NOW 
CALL RICH 641-5045 


RELAX IN CLASS 

A RELAXING MASSAGE 

by a handsome, masculine blonde 
6', 190, beautifully nude 
muscular body, summer tan 
Firm, Erotic Swedish Massage 
Massage Lotion & Table, Hard to Beat It 

$40ln/$55 0ut 75 min. 

Mike 931-0149 24 hrs 


Superb Massage 
from Charlie, instructor 
at the Body Electric. 
Sensual. $35/50. 821-7607 
E50 


MASSAGE MATES 



Very Goodlooking Masc 
muse 6'1" 190 lb blonde 
masseur certified 673-8403 
E45 

8" UNCUT ITALIAN 

Nude/Relaxed Massage 
Frank 552-2509 

E45 


Complete full body rubdown 
by hndsm grad sdt. 285-0450 

E45 


Sexy Swedish/Shiatsu massage 
combines skill and 
sensuality. Peter 864-5483 

E45 


DREAM MASSAGE 

For You Asian & Latin Guys! 

Very handsome blonde tall stud, 32, 
muscular, tan, clean cut, hung 9", 
offers a great massage in the nude. 
Relax in comfort. 

Special rate few Asian & Latin men. 
Your bottom's up on my table. 

RON 931-3263 

Warm Man 


Nude yg. smooth gdik 
Oriental fullbody masseur. 
Complete relaxed. All ages 
welcome. Bob 387-1192. 
In/out. Travel Bay Area. 

E45 


FUL L BOD Y SHI A TSU 
& FOOT REFLEXOLOGY 

o 

2 

TL 8 

'7L ^ 

% 6 

> 9 

^ 9 

PETER J. HOPKINS 

$35/90 min 


Lasv Parkiiit; & Close n 

> .Muni! 



Full body massage. Sensual, complete 
relaxing by nude body builder. 
_ JANOS (415) 665-7304 


Hot blond stripper/swimmer 
Nick $50 out 431-4859 

E45 


A confidential network of 
men who enjoy massage in 
a safe, caring atmosphere. 
Massage Mates, Box 421028 
San Francisco 94142-1028 

E48 

Handsome Man —Hot Massage 
neck & chest & buns specialty 
Deep, firm, cert., profsn'l 
6 yr exp, 9-9, Nick, 626-6210 
E46 


San Jose —Swedish Massage 
$25/1 Hr in • Shower Avail. 
Anthony (408) 288-6169 

E45 


ROMANTIC ATTRACTION 
Fun & x-handsome Nordic man 
swimmer & BB 9" cut 6' 185" 

ESPECIALLY LIKE 
SMALL CUTE ASIAN 
& LATIN YNG MEN 

Ron, for a massage 
$40/55 931-3263 24 hrs 

E45 

ATTRACTIVE YNG MAN 
offers soothing, sensual 
caring massage. Out only. 

' $35/hr. Ray 334-0517 

E45 


Masseur, straight appearance. Professional, 
clean-cut young man, 30, athletic. I will 
massage you in the nude on my massage 
table for 1 hr. $ 35/In, S45/0ut. 



24 Hours 


Hot 'n' Sexy 

David 282-3733 $60 


VIRILE SEXY ITAL 

Hot, gdikg, rockhard muscles & 
athi legs. Vers, healthy, yng, hung, 
tall Marine type. Anytime. No BS. 
Dan 753-8604 E46 



BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 39 





































































































































EOPLE & HRSONALS 



San Franciscans 
Hottest Top 

6ft.. 185lbs.. no-nonsense leather 
man. 34 y.o.. hot rugged good- 
looking. Bldnd Master Expert into 
W/S. S/M. F/F. verbal abuse, 
bondage. T/T. Well equiped game 
room. Sling, rack, mirror & toys. 
Novices Welcome. Safe 
controlled space 

MAX 673-4221 


Jockstraps Levis etc. 
WS«JO*Lt SM ★ ★ 928-0449 
E47 

Long XXX Thick 
Perfect Top Very Handsome 
27 yrs., brn hair, bl eyes 
AmEx/Visa/MC 24 hrs. 

Rod 864-4010 In/Out 

E47 

Leather & Spandex 863-3862 

E47 

★ Spanking ★ 928-0449 ir 
E47 

6'2" 190#gdlk BB safe play 
yng well hung 621-3147 

E46 

Models Wanted 
Young, clean cut All-American 
boy look — 18-25 
smooth body nat. build 
no beards top $ on publication 
— send photo to 
Star Studio 204 E 2nd Ave 
Suite 319 San Mateo, CA 
94401 

E46 


CHRIS NOLL ^ 

Erotic Moi'ie Star 
Young. 9' Hung Blonde/ 
Blue. 5'8' . 155, Smooth! 

call922>6322 


MICHAELANGELO’S 

DAVID 



Very Satisfying, Loving, Safe 

929-7336 • $100 


ROGER OF S.F. 

Short, intelligent bodybuilder {5'7'’, 165 
lbs, 42C, 29W, 16A, dynamite legs!), ex¬ 
pert in sensual physical S&M, C&B work. 
Well equipped game room, creative mind. 
Dominant but level-headed, discreet, and 
absolutely safe. 

(415) 864-5566 


ITALIAN DADDY 

Hung and Hairy 
239-8419 



JASON 

175 lbs., 5'8y2 ", 46"C, 29"W 

864-2070 

$115-VISA, MC O.K. 


SEXY SCHOOL 
► BOY ◄ 

Young, Smooth, Cute, 
Well endowed, and Fun 

► SCOTT ◄ 
( 415 ) 771*0552 


ALL AMERICAN! 

BLACK BELT KARATE 

EXPERT; YOUNG BLOND, 
blue-eyed rockhard muscle 
jock. Hung 9"-»- and thick. 
Smooth tan skin with gym¬ 
nast butt and legs. Into fan¬ 
tasy and tough sessions. No 
queens or B.S. 

CHRIS BURNS 
( 415 ) 621-0297 


• SOUTH BAY • 

• COLLEGIATE • 

21, muscular swimmer's body 
Vers, will travel. $100. 

Jeff (408) 395-6429 

_^ 

Sensuous, Safe, and Hung 

6'3" BLOND 

Rex 431-8797 24 hours 

^ 

MR. KINKY 
24 hrs. • 621-6271 


/ LAY BACK 
FRENCH PASSIVE 

S’A EXTRA THICK CUT 

Handsome, Clean-Shaven 
Boyish Good Looks 
6'1", 160, 26 yrs. 

MIKE 664-2057 

Pager 896-7815 (enter your phone #) 
fast call-back 


VERY HOT 

Vlfess6'2"185rBrBI 
Playful Stud X Extra Thick 
24 hn 885-1837 m-mi bpr 


LEATHERMASTER 

Expert B&D-S/M 

Mirrored S. of Market Playroom 
Very Aggressive & Discreet 

Your Fantasy - My Talent! 

RCA 300 Camcorder avail. 

Lots of Toys 

Healthy, Staying That Way 

JACK 

415-680-8959 


HOT BLOND JOCK 

SAFE PLAYFUL 
W/GDLKG BB, 5'8" 
155#, GRN EYES 
BEARD AND SUNTAN 
24 HRS. 

SCOTT 826-3280 


HUNG STUD 

Thick and Big 

GUS (415)469-7221 


Horse-hung Punk Jock Stud 
6'4" Blond Blue 285-4319 

_E46 

Steven-36, 6'2", 175 hard, hairy 
body. Long hair, beard 
moust. Well-hung 431-5974 

_E44 

Hot Athletic Top 
Seeks Bottom 
861-0544 

_^ 

Fat bik Tootsie Role long 
uncut meaty time 861-0544 

_^ 

Top FF Hits the Spot 863-6536 

^ 

HOT YNG MAN 

Works Erotic on 
Your Body - Well Hung 
Call Jeff For a Hot 
Time 441-6808 


UNCUT, HAIRY HUNK 

6'2", 175#, hung top, 24 hrs, safe 
$40/$50 Brian 864-8549 

E45 

Pure Beef 

31, bIk, uncut, 10 >4 safe, $50 
in $60 out Matt 221-7219 

E45 


ROUGH OR ROMANTIC 

431-8797 


HAIRY STUD 

864-2359. Steve. $40.00 

_E45 

Steve-36, 6'2" 175 br hair 
beard —hairy chest, arms and 
legs. Well hung 431-5974 

^ 

Hot Blonde 

College Student with 9" 

$25 Terry 759-1964 

_^ 

Sophisticated Strength 
Hot Energy 821-2351 $100 -f- 
__ E45 

Hot, young college student 
smooth swimmers build 150 
lbs. 5'10" David 474-9657 

__^ 

You've tried the rest, now 
get the best. Hot looks, 27, 

9" banana. 75/out only. 
Check it out! Tom 567-0986. 

E45 


ANIMAL ONE 

863-1774 


Oakland Phallic Worship. Safe 
Gentle Top, 5'5", 142, Hairy. 
FR A/P, GR/A, J/0, Verbal. $70 In 

MARC 444-3204 


Cruel stepbrothers —kinky -t- 
very real, SOM playrm —hot 
'n nasty no-sex fun. 928-5819 
E45 

B.J.'s the Best. 864-5483 
Head My Way! $25 

E45 

Hot Black Guy 474-7480 


Hung, smooth, slim, vers. 
John 775-8906 J/0 


8" & J/0 - Other Safe Hot 
in/out $20-$100 sliding 
scale 24-hr bpr# 746-1026 



HOT Bl STUD 

Youns • Handsome 
Versatile • Huns 

Alex 864-3931 


For your pleasure.,. 

Sexy, clean-cut student. 
Smooth, fit & ton. 

19 yrs. blue/brown. 5'11’. 150# 

Young, healthy & safe 

DALE 928-4896 


6'4", 195#, hairy X-Army sgt. 
Chuck 431-1579 e 51 


B»E*A*S«T*l*E«/Boy Toy 23 
Blond Bowl Haircut»Smooth 
Hot Body«Hung»Fun & Safe* 
Dexter Is Best! 893-3669 

E45 

8" UNCUT 
Mark 552-2509 

E45 

INCREDIBLE 

Sexy stud, hung huge & thick, 
available for safe fun. 

Jon • $100 • 431-2316 • Anytime 
E45| 

PAUL MUSCLE 

19" A 50" C 31" W 771-4094 
^^ 

Hndsm guy - Good body contact. 
Pvt. game rm, W/S 863-6536/24 hrs 
E50 

Hot Boyish Blonde Superhung 
5'10", 135#, 22 safe a lot of fun! 
Call George 776-9240 In/Out 

E45 

★ COLT MUSCLE GOD ★ 

Pay homage to a straight physique 
star. 5'9", 190#, 18" a, 32" w, 
48" c, tan & cut. Strictly for those 
who crave a stud. 285-1794 am 
E46 


SERIOUS MUSCLE 

Comp. BB new In town, 26 yr. 
S'10", 210 lbs., 19"A, 49"C 
31"W, 18"C, Catalonian 
complexion. Hung $80/ln 
S 100/out Vince 861-7931 



DAN 

$100 

922-3645 

VISA/MC ACCEPTED 
(Additional $25) 


Young, masculine, tough and 
lots of good times. Topboy. 
Prefer outcalls. 

SEXY & THICK 

Nickolas$80 415-552-8774 

*!ipVf¥TT* 


very handsome 

25 - 6 Ft -170 lbs. 
in/out 24 hrs, $100 
(Vallejo) (707) 648-1707 

BOTTOM 

Andy $40/in 759*5291 

E46 

"Big Red Bear" 

Great B/J 771-1694 

E46 

Bobby attr hot bod vers, 
special rates for students 
885-5625 eves only in/out 

E46 

BLOND BOTTOM 

Clean cut, safe. Jay 285-0450 

E45 

ONE BIG PACKAGE 

'Handsome virile man 

6'1" 220 lbs 

814 " X 6" uncut, big sac 
$100 out $80 in 

Rob 567-3941 

E45 

Top German Horse w/long & 
thick "Slab of Flesh" 621-1260 
E45 

EX-FIREMAN 

30, 5'10", 190 lbs., BR/BR, 

8" - 1 - cut. Likes to lean back 
while you work his hose. 

DAN 861-7931 

NO GREEK 


SCOTT 

COLLEGE-JOCK 100.00 
(415) 825-2433 

"GYMNAST" 

JOCK-23 YRS. 

Blond, blue-eyed, masculine 
Suy with boyish good looks. 
Incredible "V-shaped" torso 
& washboard abs! Thighs & 
calves of steel! 5' 9" 165 lbs, 
43"C, 28"W, "Hung Huge & 
Thick!" Safe only. 

WOLF 753-6539 



BIG BUTT tall hairy blue-eyed 
Daddy. Chad 861-7014 e 48 

★ $25-Hot Athlete. Hung nice# 

★ Bill 441-1054 Massage, etc.# 

_^ 

HUNKY SWED 

Handsome Hairy Tall Big Balls 
Hung 24 hrs Axel 863-0252 

E47 


★ ★YNG. STUD★★ 

24,6', 150#, 9"x6y2" 
Brown Hr., Blue Eyes 
HAIRY CHEST 
Smooth Defined Body 
24 Hrs. In/Out 

★ ★ "RICK" ★★ 

★ ★(415) 861-0512^^ 


BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 40 






















































































































































BAY AREA REPORTER 
SPORTS & FITNESS 



SF Hosts Tourney, IGBO Confab 


$20K On The Line In Big No-Tap 



Camaraderie is really the point of SFNTIT and IGBO 


(Photo: Photo Graphics/Darlene) 


by Richard McPherson 

Over 300 gay and lesbian 
bowlers from around the U.S. and 
Canada are in town this weekend, 
Nov. 5-8, for the 4th Annual SF 
No-Tap Invitational Tournament 
(SFNTIT ’87) and the Interna¬ 
tional Gay Bowling Organization 
(IGBO) midyear meeting. 

San Francisco’s Castle Lanes 
on Geneva Avenue (next to the 
Cow Palace) is the site of team, 
doubles and singles tournament 
action. The tournament is under 
the auspices of IGBO which will 
hold its semi-annual meeting at 
the San Franciscan Hotel. 

SFNTIT ’87 is one of the 
largest tournaments on IGBO’s 
roster in terms of numbers, but 
offers the largest prize fund of 
any gay tournament in the coun¬ 
try. Bowlers will be competing for 
over $20,000 in prize money; the 
first place four-person team will 
receive $1,600 in cash, the 
doubles winners $1,200 and the 
singles champ will walk away with 
$800. 

Fundraising events and Bud 
Lite sponsorship in the amount 
of $5,000 has caused the prize 
fund to swell to this magnitude 
and still provide over $10,000 for 
distribution to the AIDS Emer¬ 
gency Fund, Coming Home Hos¬ 
pice and the Home for Battered 
Women. 


HIGH ROLLERS 

Some of the best gay and les- 
I bian bowling competitors in the 
[ country will be participating, 
some with professional-caliber, 
200-plus averages. SFNTIT is 
unique in that it is the only na¬ 
tional no-tap tournament in ex¬ 
istence, gay or straight. The no¬ 
tap format includes a nine-pin 
count on the first ball thrown as 
a strike. The handicapping for¬ 
mat of this event means that 
bowlers of all levels of expertise 
have an equal chance at the first 
place prize money. 

In addition to the 100-plus 
men and women bowlers from the 
SF area there will be an equal 
number in attendance from the 


Los Angeles area; over 20 bowlers 
are in town from Florida as well 
as from Portland, with a dozen or 
so from Vancouver, Seattle, 
Milwaukee and Dallas. Over 400 
bowlers in all will represent 48 
major cities. 

Competition runs continuous¬ 
ly at Castle Lanes from Friday 
through Sunday. Doubles and 


singles events are scheduled from 
9 a.m.-8 p.m. on Friday and Sat¬ 
urday. Team play runs on Sunday 
from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. In each squad 
there will be wall-to-wall bowlers 
in the 40-lane bowling establish¬ 
ment. Spectators are welcome 
during all scheduled events. The 
awards banquet will be held Sun¬ 
day evening at the San Fran¬ 
ciscan Hotel. 


All You Ever Wanted To Know 


What Is An IGBO? 


by Ron Keel 

President, Int'l. Gay Bowling Organization 


If you were asked “What is an 
IGBO?” you would probably say 
one of four things: The ghost of 
an igloo; a baby egret; a deriva¬ 
tion of “Yo, Bro!” or ALF’s baby 
brother. 

Cute, but wrong on all counts. 

Of course, if the survey is done 
this weekend, chances are the 
question would be put to several 
IGBOs, or, to be grammatically 
correct, keglers of the Interna¬ 
tional Gay Bowling Organization 
—the world’s largest gay sports 
organization. 

Formed in 1980, IGBO was in¬ 
corporated as a nonprofit organ¬ 
ization in 1985 and now boasts 
more than 15,000 members in 
more than 50 U.S. and Canadian 
cities. 

About 400 of those IGBO men 
and women are in town for this 
weekend’s No Tap Invitational 
Tournament, which is hosting 
IGBO’s mid-year meeting for the 
first time. 

IGBO developed from the 
brainstorm of a handful of bowl¬ 
ers who met in Los Angeles in 
1980. At the time, gay bowling 
leagues were growing in popu¬ 
larity and the group believed it 
was time to form a national or¬ 
ganization to bring the diverse 
groups together. 


IGBO was born to promote 
‘‘unity, communication and 
fellowship” within the interna¬ 
tional gay bowling community, 
according to New York City’s 
Tom Hack, one of the co-founders 
and the organization’s first pres¬ 
ident. 

Word about IGBO’s formation 
quickly spread, and membership 
has grown steadily. Today, more 
than 80 individual leagues or 
tournaments are members. 
League memberships range from 
30 bowlers to more than 300. 

During the past eight years 
IGBO has developed an excellent 
organizational structure. It is 
addressing other issues that are 
important to our continued 
growth and success. They include 
getting more female member¬ 
ship, developing workshops on 
subjects important to IGBO 
members and expansion beyond 
the U.S. and Canada. 

IGBO sponsors a major inter¬ 
national bowling tournament 
every Memorial Day weekend. 
Member cities bid to host the 
prestigious event. Host cities 
have been Houston, Dallas, 
Chicago, Seattle, Louisville, Las 
Vegas and New Orleans. In 1988, 
Washington, D.C. will host an ex¬ 
pected 1,200 bowlers, and Cincin¬ 
nati is the 1989 host. • 


LOTS OF PARTIES 

Castro Area, Mission District, 
Haight St. area and South of 
Market bars will take turns 
hosting and welcoming bowlers 
on Thursday through Sunday 
evenings, with Castro Station, on 
Castro near 18th, being the one 
bar to serve as host for all four 
evenings. Sunday evening will 
culminate in a flaming hot Tea 
Dance, honoring our out-of- 
towners, at Dreamland, Harrison 
at Third. (Bowlers will be admit¬ 
ted free, all others $5.) There will 
be dancing till 2 a.m. 

Raffle tickets will be sold for 


the duration of the tournament 
with all proceeds to be distri¬ 
buted to the aforementioned 
charities (last year’s raffle raised 
$6,000). Prizes include a week in 
Hawaii for two, VCR and many, 
many others. 

Bowlers are reminded that 
tournament check-in is at the San 
Franciscan Hotel in the Crystal 
Ball Room, Thursday, Nov. 5 
from 3 p.m.-12 Midnight. Pick up 
your registration packet and ID 
badge at that time. It will be your 
admission to all partying events. 
There will be a no-host bar from 
5-9 p.m. • 


JUST GIVE ME SIX WEEKS! 
AND I WILUI’fS//>IPf YOUR body. 


MICHAEL 

THURMOND 
6 WEEK BODY 
MAKEOVER 



MODEL: MICHAEL THURMOND 


NOT JUST A WORKOUT PROGRAM- 
WE RESHAPE YOU 


Results are evident in three weeks. I’ve lost 20 lbs. and am 
building a body that I didn’t think I could have. It’s great! 
Sam K. 

I gained 18 lbs. in 6 weeks in all the right places! 

John Schoens 

Michael and his program are truly amazing! I’ve lost 20 lbs. 
in 4 weeks. I feel better and have more energy than I have 
had in years. And all It took was one phone call to Michael. 
I’m ready to sign up for life. 

Fred Seals 

Mike has tailored his program to meet my individual goals 
and dietary needs. He has shown me how to train hard and 
get results. For the first time I have been able to successful¬ 
ly combine bodybuilding with aerobic exercise. The result 
has been a major transformation of my body in only six 
weeks. And I feel better than I have in years. 

Steve Smith 


. .• RESULTS GUARANTEED! 

CALL NOW FOR FREE CONSULTATION 

415-821-7268 


BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 41 





























NEW MESSAGE WITH EACH CALL LEAVE YOUR NUMBER AND HEIL FIND YOU 

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Arnold Tops Leagues 
With 697 Series 


by Richard McPherson 

David Arnold is on a roll. He 
finished last winter season with 
a 169 average and already he’s 
left that average in the dust! In 
the Monday Tavern Guild League 
at Park Bowl, on Oct. 12, he 
punched out games of 235,238, 
224 for a whopping 697 series. 
He’s currently averaging 203 
after five weeks of league play. 

Arnold, who has been bowling 
since the age of three stopped for 
ten years and began again in the 
gay leagues at Japantown Bowl 
one-and-a-half years ago. This is 
his first season at Park Bowl and 
he says, quite naturally, that he 
loves the lanes. He came within 
three pins of the magic 700 mark 
but says he wasn’t thinking about 
a 700 series at all. “In fact I 
didn’t even think I would get 
another 200 my last game,” he 
remarked. Twelve years ago, 
David averaged in the 180s, and 
his current efforts are even now 
putting that average behind him. 
He was delighted by his series 
and reports that this is his best 
ever, his previous high being in 
the 640s. 

LOADS OF 600s 

There were many 600+ series 
shot in the Tavern Guild Leagues 
(TGL) at Park Bowl the week of 
Oct. 12-15. Tim Mulvenon (182 
avg.) shot a 648 series on games 
of 216,206,226. Angelo Maggio 
was hot all week, warming up in 
the 6:30 Monday Trios league 
with a 220 game, before shooting 
a 642 in the Monday TGL (214, 
225,203) followed by a 628 in the 
Wednesday TGL with a 239 high 
game. (Yes, Angelo was that hand¬ 
some speck in the background of 
last week’s column photo.) 

Other 600s: Don Gambell (159 
avg.) 199,210,216/625; Doug Lit- 
win (168) 212, 214/615; Randy 
Peterson (173) 225, 235/615; 
Glenn Judd (165) 201, 202, 207 
/610; J.C. Halstead (182) 233, 
231/610; Ljubo Sliskovic (173) 
234, 206/600. 

Other games over 215: Roy 
Thorson (195 avg.) 234; Pat Con- 
Ion (172) 225; Don Gambell (159) 


224,214; Robyn Trost (157) 224; 
Tom Neidert (143) 210. 

Other achievers: Joe Sanders 
(152 avg.) 212, 210; Rich Ed¬ 
monds (150) 202; John Perry (153) 
203. Special congratulations to 
David Kelsey (134) on a 211 game 
and Joe Wiggins (138) on a 204 
... an exciting experience for 
both. 

In the S.E Women’s Business 
League for Oct. 18 and 25, Mel 
Coyle (184 avg.) was the big 
shooter on the 25th with a 228, 
196, 200 for a 624; the previous 
Sunday she shot a 218 game. 

Other 200+ games: Patti 
Oates (189 avg.) 247 & 203; Velda 
Gooden (198) 233 & 201; Mary 
Russi (150) 221; Cathy Patterson 
(164) 219; Shanon Dorn (156) 219; 
Dolly Casazza (158) 213, 211; 
Dolores Swoyer (166) 206, 213; 
Sara Lewinstein (176) 213; 
Dolores Swoyer (166) 211 and 
Gayle Rodgers (159) 207. 

No scores to report from 
Japantown Bowl this time around 
since I got ahead of myself last 
week. 

WHOOPS! 

Apologies for the error in last 
week’s column where Velda 
Gooden and Pat Conlon’s scores 
merged together, omitting one 
sentence completely. The sen¬ 
tences should’ve read: Velda 
Gooden, 192 avg., still hot from 
her 656 series a few weeks ago, 
shot a 246 and 232 along the way 
to a 665 series. Other 200s that 
night (Oct. 11) Bernice Straub 
(166 avg.) 235; Robyn Trost (157) 
203; Patti Oates (175) 201. Pat 
Conlon (171 avg.) had the high 
series at Park Bowl in the TGL 
the week of 10/5 to 10/7 with a 
628 series, highlighted by a 212 
and 224. 

Is nothing sacred?... A scene 
in an East Bay shopping mall 
parking lot: someone broke into 
Arne Prince’s car and stole his 
two bowling balls, a bag and 
bowling shoes ... and that’s all! 
Everything else intact. No doubt 

(Continued on next page) 



Bowlers at Play 

The evening hours will be party time for SFNTIT ’87 bowlers. 
Following is the roster of what’s-happening-where for bowlers, 
friends and athletic supporters. 

Thur., Nov. 5: Welcoming Parties 

9-11 p.m. 

Cafe San Marcos, Market nr. Castro— 

Buffet for Bowlers; 

11 p.m.-2 a.m. 

Castro Station, Castro nr. 18th St. 

Fri., Nov. 6: Host Bar —Buffet for Bowlers; 


Half-price Drinks 

6-9 p.m. 

Rawhide II, 280 7th St./Folsom 

“A Little Bit of Country in our City by the Bay” 


Sat., Nov. 7: Party Bars 

All evening 

Pilsner Inn, Church/Market Sts. 

Castro Station, Castro nr. 18th St. 

Mauds, 937 Cole St. 

Amelias, 647 Valencia St. 

S.F Eagle, 12th St./Harrison 


Kokpit, 301 Turk St. 

The Village, 18th St. nr. Castro 

Sun., 

Nov 8: Post Tournament Recovery 

9:30 p.m.+ 

Castro Station 

Official Host Bar, “very special” drink prices 

10-2 a.m. 

Post Tournament Tea Dance 


Dreamland, 715 Harrison/Third 

Bowlers admitted free with ID badge or pass. 


BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5. 1987 PAGE 42 

























LOOK 

mm 

CRUISING! 


^ NEW ; 
\ GUYS / 


NEW 

GUYS 


NEW 

GUYS 


GUYS 


BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5. 1987 PAGE 43 


Wrestling Alive And Well In SF 


by Rick Thoman 

While wrestling may not be the 
most popular sport in the gay 
community, the images of hard 
muscled, half-naked bodies grap¬ 
pling in sweaty combat holds a 
special place in the fantasies of 
many gay men and lesbians. San 
Francisco has two wrestling clubs 
ready to accommodate the no¬ 
vice, recreational wrestler all the 
way to the hard-core competitive 
grappler. 

Wrestling enthusiast Jim 
Dollard has provided space at his 
home in Bernal Heights for both 
the San Francisco Wrestling 
Club and the Golden Gate Wres¬ 
tling Club to hold practice ses¬ 
sions. Dollard is head of the S.F. 
Wrestling Club which he de¬ 
scribes as “a sort of catch-all for 
anyone interested in participat¬ 
ing in wrestling.” 

“We do a little bit of every¬ 
thing in the S.F. Wrestling Club,” 
explained Dollard. “We may 
wrestle pro-style or collegiate 
freestyle, or do some tag-team 
wrestling or even a little bit of 
boxing. This is our ninth year as 
an organization and our mem¬ 
bership stands at about 50 peo¬ 
ple, varying in age, size, weight, 
and interest in the sport.” 

Dollard describes the group as 
“part social club, part sports 
club, and even a little bit of a 
‘fantasy’ club inasmuch as we 
sometimes have special sessions 
where members can live out their 
fantasies on the mats. We’ve had 
oil wrestling matches, something 
called ‘kinky nights’ and more.” 
The group is basically set up for 
fun and exercise and boasts a 
loose network of similar gay 
wrestling clubs in New York, 
Chicago, Los Angeles and New 
Orleans. 

Wrestling has held the interest 
of Dollard for many years. He 
even feels wrestling helped bring 
him “out.” Self-described as 
“shy” in college, he was “more 
of a bookworm than a jock. 
Wrestling was the only athletic 
endeavor I participated in. Even¬ 
tually 1 found out you could do 
more with men than just wrestle.” 

LOTS OF TRAINING 

While the S.F. Wrestling Club 
is more social in orientation, the 
Golden Gate Wrestling Club is 
set up for more competitive work. 


The wrestlers are getting ready for Gay Games I 


(Photo: M. Hicks) 


Don Jung organized the Golden 
Gate Club in 1982 in preparation 
for Gay Games I. The club won 
numerous medals at both Gay 
Games and is currently gearing 
up for the 1990 Vancouver 
Games. 

The Golden Gate Wrestling 
Club practices freestyle- 
collegiate wrestling, adhering to 
freestyle rules and regulations. It 
places emphasis on technique 
and execution. Participation in 
the Golden Gate Club involves 
lots of training, with specific 
drills for competition. 

Following the death of Jung 
after last year’s Gay Games, Gene 
Dermody took charge of the 
Golden Gate Club. Originally 
from New York, Dermody wres¬ 
tled in high school and college 
and coached high school wres¬ 
tling for 13 years. He was a 
medalist in Gay Games II and he 
is continuing to excite the com¬ 
munity about the thrills of wres¬ 
tling. 

“We have approximately 10 
members now,” Dermody said. 
“Five of them will definitely go 
to the 1990 Gay Games, and three 
of those five are potential gold 
medalists. Most of our members 
are in their thirties, but the club 
as well as the Games are open to 
all ages. We would like to en¬ 


Team SF Elects Committee 


by Rick Thoman 

Team San Francisco is official¬ 
ly underway as the representative 
organization and liaison to the 
1990 Gay Games in Vancouver, 
Canada. A governing committee 
of five men and five women was 
elected to a one-year term at an 
open organizing meeting con¬ 
ducted on Oct. 24. 

The committee members are: 
Nancy Warren, Ellen Able, Mary 
Ann Powers, Sunny Mawson, 
Trish Hastings, Rick Windes, 
Mark Lipinski, Bernard Turner, 
Bob Puerzer, and Shawn Kelley. 

Team San Francisco will be re¬ 
sponsible for sending a unified 
San Francisco contingent to the 
1990 Gay Games in Vancouver. 
The purpose of Team San Fran¬ 
cisco will be to communicate with 
Vancouver and relay information 
regarding the 1990 Games to the 
San Francisco sports community. 
The organization will work on 
raising funds for the Team SF 
uniform (not the individual 
sports uniforms), facilitate travel 
and housing arrangements, and 
work closely with the various 
sports organizations and their 
members. 


Complete governing rules for 
the Team San Francisco organi¬ 
zation are being formulated for 
presentation at the next general 
meeting to be held sometime in 
January. Everyone seeking to 
participate in the 1990 Gay 
Games is urged to get involved 
with Team SF and the represen¬ 
tative sports organizations. For 
more information regarding 
Team San Francisco, contact 
558-8282. • 

Bowling 

(Continued from previous page) 
the thief was desperate for the 
ball that had recently shot a 751 
league series. Too bad, Arne, but 
when ya’ got a need. I, on the 
other hand, found my car window 
broken a few weeks ago and dis¬ 
covered only a cheap cassette 
player missing. Thank God the 
thief didn’t see my bowling ball 
in the back seat! 

Anyway... welcome SFNTIT 
’87 bowlers and IGBO delegates 
... good luck, have fun and party 
hearty! • 


courage more young people to 
come out and participate.” 

Dermody admits that they 
have problems keeping members 
involved with the club. “We have 
matches against the L.A. gay 
team twice a year, but other 
meets are few and far between. 
That makes it hard to keep the 
competitive spirit going. Plus the 
fact that our training is pretty in¬ 
tense and can involve an austere 
regimen if the guys have prob¬ 
lems maintaining their match 
weight.” 

GREAT INSTRUCTION 

However, the Golden Gate 
Wrestling Club offers excellent 


instruction from Dermody as well 
as others that include an NCAA 
finalist and a Pan American 
Games participant. The club 
hopes to move practices to the 
MCC Church in the Castro soon, 
if insurance hassles can be iron¬ 
ed out. Dermody hopes the more 
centralized Castro location and 
the fast approaching Gay Games 
III will stir renewed interest in his 
group. 

The Golden Gate Wrestling 
Club currently meets at Dollard’s 
home on Tuesday nights from 7 
to 9 p.m. For more information, 
contact Dermody at 821-2991. 

The San Francisco Wrestling 
Club meets every other Saturday 


Gay Sports Day 
On Angel Island 

Care to run, hike or bike 
around Angel Island on a plea¬ 
sant Sunday afternoon? How 
about some softball, volleyball 
or an aerobic workout under 
the sun? Or, just relax for a few 
hours by the water and enjoy 
magnificent scenery and new 
friends. There’s all this and lots 
more awaiting you as the SF 
FrontRunners host the 6th an¬ 
nual Gay Sports Day on Angel 
Island on Sunday Nov. 15, from 
11 a.m.-4 p.m. 

Close to 30 gay and lesbian 
sports organizations from San 
Francisco and the Bay Area will 
be represented there, including 
Gay/Lesbian Sierrans, the Gay 
Softball League, Wilderness 
Women and many, many others. 
Some of these clubs will present 
individual sporting events that 
day (a Fun Run, a hike across 
the island, volleyball game, 
wrestling match, etc.) while 
others will simply introduce the 
public to their respective organ¬ 
izations. 

And what will be the main 
event that day? As has been 
done in the past, there will be 
a huge potluck and picnic im¬ 
mediately following the sports 
events. All are encouraged to at¬ 
tend and to get to know our 
sports community. Admission is 
free to all, but you are asked to 
bring a dish (entree, salad or 
desert) to share and your own 
beverage. For further details, 
please contact SF FrontRun¬ 
ners’ Jim Miller (922-1435) or 
Wendy Cosin (626-1478). • 


at 11 a.m. For more information, 
contact Dollard at 821-9721. • 


The Telephone 
Bulletin Board 
for Gay Men 


GUARANTEED 

4 hot phone numbers 
eadi time you call. 


NEW! 


messages change 
- evewi^hours - 


Call 415 



















CHICKENS# POLICEMEN# MECHANICS# COWBOYS 


SIZZLING HOT 
MAN-SEX 


Tired of the same unbelievaDle 

FANTASIES? 

You’ve NEVER had a sex call 
this HOT, NASTY and SEXY... NEVER! 

Message CHANGES with EACH CALL 

976-6328 


WRESTLERS* FIREMEN • CONSTRUCTION MEN 


Dreamin’ about doin’ it ALL? 

We are doin’ it and lovin’ every minute of it! 
What are we doin’? Just give us a call . . . 
It’s your choice - ANYWAY YOU LIKE IT! 


KINK • TOPS • UNIFORMS 
GROUP ORGASMS 

976-2800 



Duck, Betty, Duck, Vanna 
Tops In 9-Ball 


by Lauren Ward 

The 16 finalists who gathered 
at the Bear Saturday morning 
had already survived a total field 
of nearly 50 players. Today it 
would be decided who would 
claim the S.F. Pool Association’s 
annual 9-Ball Championship. 

When the smoke cleared there 
were two Deluxe Ducks and one 
each from the Betty and Vanna 
White Swallow teams in the top 
four. 

The tournament’s format was 
double elimination with each 
match consisting of a race to four 
wins. Matches among the final 
four were a race to five. For the 
finalists this meant a full day of 
concentration and athletic per¬ 
formance. 

David Lee of the Betty White 
Swallow team is currently ranked 
#1 in league play. He won a close 
4/3 first-round match against 
Lisa Duncan of the Deluxe Ducks 
and proceeded to pick up steam 
as he defeated defending Cham¬ 
pion Rick Mariani 4/2; then 
Chuck Numbers 4/2; and finally 
E.Z. 5/3 in the winners’ bracket 
semi-final. 

After her first-round loss, Lisa 
stormed through the losers’ 
bracket, eliminating Barry White 
4/2; Lynn Westhoven 4/0; “Pooh 
Bear” Davis 4/1; and James In- 
glis 4/1. It was a rather aston¬ 
ishing 16/4 streak. 

Rick Mariani, Vanna White 
Swallow team captain, eliminated 
Kelvin Roberts 4/3, Lauren Ward 
4/2, and Chuck Numnbers 4/3 
before being defeated by Lisa 5/4. 
He finished fourth with a tourna¬ 
ment record of 22/20. 

Lisa’s string of match victories 
would be broken by teammate 



E.Z. in the losers’ bracket final by 
a 5/3 score. Her 27/17 tournament 
record represented more games 
than were played by any other 
participant, and her third-place 
finish was well earned. 

Those who remained at the 
Cafe San Marcos were treated to 
an amazing exhibition as E.Z. 
caught fire and reeled off five 
consecutive victories against 
David Lee to force the final 
tiebreaker for the title. 

To the amazement of all, his 
winning streak continued. Fuel¬ 
ed by momentum, good luck, 
skill, and his opponent’s errors, 
he fired off another five in a row, 
applying the coup de grace with 
a 9-Ball combo to the corner 
pocket. 

David Lee’s second-place 
finish was worth $175. He finish¬ 
ed with a 17/20 tournament rec¬ 
ord. 

E.Z.’s 30/12 was good for the 
top spot and brought the number 
of major SFPA tournaments he’s 
won at least once to five. 

In addition to cash prizes for 
all 16 finalists and com¬ 
memorative T-shirts for all par¬ 
ticipants, the top four will be 
awarded trophies at the annual 
awards party, thanks to tourna¬ 
ment sponsor Bracco Distribut¬ 
ing and Bud Lite. 

League President Donna Blow, 
who acted as tournament direc¬ 
tor, and the entire Board of Direc¬ 
tors would like to thank the 
players as well as the staff and 
management of each of the tour¬ 
nament sites for helping to create 
a successful competition. 

Dial JOE-POOL for SFPA in¬ 
formation. • 


The Watering Hole team 


(Photo: L. Ward) 


San Francisco 
Pool Association Standings 


DIVISION I 


DIVISION III 


Vanna White Swallow 
Cinch Saddletramps 
Bear Thuggs 
Imelda San Marcos 
Pendulum Pirates 
Overpass L’Equipe 
Castro Sta. Express 
Badlands I 


W -L Pet. 
112- 64.636 
97- 79.551 
94- 80.540 
79- 97 .449 
79- 97.449 
73-103 .415 
70-106.298 
58-102 .363 


Deluxe Ducks 
Waterhole IV Revenge 
Park Bowl Pockettes 
Detour DV8S 
Special Effects 
Amelia’s R Us 
Elaine’s Elites 
Maud’s T & C’s 


w- 

- L Pet. 

121- 

55 .688 

101- 

75 .574 

94- 

82 .534 

91- 

85 .517 

82- 

78.513 

88- 

88.500 

78- 

98.443 

60-100 .375 


DIVISION II 

W — L Pet. 
Betty White Swallow 112- 48.700 

S. Marcos Marksmen 80- 64.556 

Bear Bottoms 72- 72.500 

Castro Sta. Cruisers 72- 88.450 

Pilsner Pluggers 62-114.352 

Peg’s Panthers 54-106.338 

OverPass Turnarounds 30- 88.254 


DIVISION IV 


Watering Hole Too 
Eagle Creek Chaos III 
Park Bowl Badasses 
Other Deluxe 
Detour Destroyers 
Special Delivery 
Maud’s Squad 
Amelia’s Furies 


W — L Pet. 
110- 66.625 
109- 67 .619 
107- 69 .608 
99- 77.563 
96- 80.545 
94- 80.545 
82- 94.534 
62- 90.366 • 


BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5. 1987 PAGE 44 






























Documentary Features Lesbian 


Acting Our Age, an hour-long 
documentary about women’s ex¬ 
periences of aging in contem¬ 
porary America, premieres on 
Wednesday, Nov. 11, at 7:30 p.m. 
at the Palace of Fine Arts Thea¬ 
ter, 3301 Lyon St. in San Francis¬ 
co. The documentary is a benefit 
for the San Francisco Gray Pan¬ 
thers, the Women’s Building and 
Options For Women Over 40. 

The stories of six women are 
featured by producer-director 
Michal Aviad. One of the women 
is Shevy Healy,65, from Idylwild, 
CA, who came out as a lesbian at 
the age of 50. 

A champagne and dessert re¬ 
ception will follow the screening. 


Admission to the event is on a 
sliding scale, $8-15. Tickets are 
available in San Francisco at 
Modern Times Bookstore, Old 
Wives Tales Book Store, Aquatic 
Park Senior Center, Glide 
Church Seniors, Rosa Parks 
Senior Center, Salvation Army 
Senior Center and the Potrero 
Hill Neighborhood House. In 
Oakland, tickets are available 
after Oct. 1 at A Woman’s Place 
Bookstore. For more information, 
call 431-1180. • 


CMC Carnival 
Set For Nov. 8 


Motor Club Carnival will be held 
this year on Sunday, Nov. 8, ac¬ 
cording to club President David 
Sarathain. The carnival will be 
held at the Service Employees 
Union (SEIU) Hall, 240 Golden 
Gate Ave., from 12 Noon until 8 
p.m. 

There will be music, entertain¬ 
ment, an open bar and typical 
carnival booths. In addition, 
there will be the traditional Mr. 
CMC Carnival contest. Much of 
the proceeds from CMC Carnival 
will go to various charities, 
especially for those helping in 
the AIDS crisis. 

Tickets are $8 in advance, $10 
at the door. Tickets are available 
at Headlines, the SF Eagle, 
Kimo’s, the Mint, the Village, Mr. 
S. Leathers and the Kokpit. 


Booth space is available. Per¬ 
sons interested in booth space 
may call 626-1805 or 282-5955. • 


Submissions Sought 

Short stories by women are be¬ 
ing sought for an anthology to be 
published by Cleis Press in May, 
1988. The theme is Unholy Alli¬ 
ances: the ways in which people 
collide, cross boundaries of sex, 
culture, race and lifestyle — 
connect across differences. Or? 

Stories should be typed and 
double-spaced. Please include a 
SASE if you wish your submis¬ 
sion returned. The deadline is 
Dec. 31. Contributors will receive 
payment and books. Send to 
Louise Rafkin, 1044V^ 53rd St., 
Oakland, CA 94608. • 


Dance At Cesar's 

Amigas y su Grupo Ritmo, a 
New Mexico-based jazz and salsa 
band, will provide the music for 
a dance at Cesar’s Latin Palace, 
3140 Mission St., on Sunday, Nov. 
8. The band’s appearance is 
sponsored by Feminista Latina 
Action Nueva (FLAN). Admission 
is $5 and FLAN promises door 
prizes. Dance time is from 9 a.m. 
until 2 a.m. 

FLAN spokesperson Maria 
Bautista emphasized that this 
dance is open to the gay and les¬ 
bian community of San Francis¬ 
co. She added that the dance is 
an opportunity to hear Amigas, 
a mixed band of gay and straight 
members. The group has been 
getting excellent reviews in many 
southwestern states. • 





Classif ADs 
f OR Class 5 ^ People 
Bay Area Reporter 


5^ IVA'HOTEL 

DAILY •WEEKLY •MONTHLY 

$ 70 & Up Weekly 

(415)863-6388 

539 Octavia. S.F, CA 94102 


BEST POLK ST. ADDRESS 

SMALL FRIENDLY ROOMING 
HOUSE ATMOSPHERE - GAY BLDG. 

THE SHIRLEY 

1544 Pbik nr. Sacramento 928-3353 
FROM $75 PER WEEK 


OONNELLy HOTEL 

Clean • Quiet 

Central to Polk. Folsom. Castro Areas 
$75 wk. & UP 

1272 Market Street 
552-3373 


CIVIC CENTER HOTEL 

$70/wk & up - $20/day & up 
24 hr. Desk - Switchboard 
Great Transportation 

20 - 12th St. (nr. Market & Van Nasal 
861-2373 


COMMUNITY 

RENTALS 

• Over 1300 Apts, flats & 
houses each month. 

• Vacancies in all city areas. 

• 2 convenient offices. 

• Open 7 days a week. 

• Gay owned/Gay staffed. 

552-9595 


Huge, elegant Queen Ann Viet. 
Flat, $1,250. W/W, DW, Nr. Trans. 
OK to share. Pet negot. 425 
Buchanan. 626-1029^626-3348 
E46 

Bunkhouse 

Apts. 

Office: 419 Ivy Street 
San Francisco 
Mon.-Fri. 1-6 PM 


Commercial Space 
Available for Retail 


$600 - 1BR Apt, 562 Hayes, #4 
hardwood floors, tile kitchen & 
bath, gas stove, curtains & shades. 

$600 - 1BR Apt, 419 Ivy, #17 

Great southern exposure, sunny, 
w/w carpeting, AEK, unique, cur¬ 
tains & shades 

$600 - 1BR Apt, 514 Hayes, #3 
w/w carpet, gas stove, curtains & 
shades, very quiet. 

$550 - 1BR Apt, 419 Ivy #4-D 
w/w carpet, AEK, ground floor, 
curtains & shades. 

$550 - Studio, 501 Octavia #3 
w/w carpeting, curtains & shades, 
gas stove. 

$500 - Studio, 419 Ivy #8 
AEK, w/w carpeting, curtains & 
shades. Quiet. Perfect for the right 
person. 

Stove, refrigerator included. 
Cable ready. First and last 
months’ rent required. No 
deposits. Must be employed. 

863-6262 



Hotel Leland 

1515 Polk 5t. AT Bu5m 


5aii Framosco, CA 94109 
(415) 441-5141 

GREAT LOCATION!! GREAT RATES!! 


Over 100 sunny spacious rooms rooms with bath 
sfiifiir,' . (dloi tv'- phonos maid service 2<-i hou'des- 


MEW MAMAQEMEMT 5IMCE JULY 1986 



$625, 1 Bdrm, garden apt. near 
Castro, new decor, WW carpet, 
D/W, util, included. 621-0760 

E46 


Storefront/Studio for rent 
525 sq. ft. -I- patio & storage. 
Beautiful! $ 585/mo. 864-6516 

E45 

2 Bed. 2 Bath, Deck, Garage, 
Laundry, near Mount Zion Hosp. 
Lease. $800. 921-8504. E45 

$875. 2 Brm apt. Collingwood 
St., Garage avail. Call eves/wknds 
552-5100 or 552-5694. E45 

1 Bdrm unfurn. flat. Remod. 
W/W, Nr. Panhandle. $750/mo. 
Day: 564-4553. Eve: 563-6740 
E45 


STUDIO APT. $375. 

Unfurn. New carpt., stove & 
refrig. Clean, well managd bldg. 
Single, emplyd only. No pets. 
First, last-t- $150 sec. deposit. Call 
Ron 673-6755. E45 

$650. Lrg., sunny 1 Bdrm betwn 
Haight & Castro. Laundry Rm., 
Elevator, roofdeck. Quiet, secure 
bldg. 863-8908. E45 

S.F. 12th St. 800 sq. ft. Toilet and 
basin, office. Ground floor. No 
live-in. $550/mo. 924-2112 eves. 

E45 


COTTAGE - 1 BEDROOM 

$725. Private, Secure, Quiet 
Brite, Nu Kitch. w/gas self-clean¬ 
ing oven. Beautiful garden with 
fountain & hot tub. Fell/Steiner 
864-6626 eves. E45 


LAKE SHORE APT. 

1 Bdrm. private secluded 
Brick Courtyd Entrance 
Garden Setting, Ist/Last 
Sec.Dep. Message 644-0434 
E45 


$775. 2 Bed, Beautifully 
Remodeled. AEK, Levs. W/W 
Includes Parking, Lndry 
McAllister/Baker. 923-1317 

E45 


$825. Lg. Sunny 2 Brm, View, 
W/W, Clean, Secure, Quiet Bldg 
Cat OK. Lndry. 141A Done St. 
off Folsom, near 9th Street, 
621-0871 

E45 


LAFAYETTE HOUSE 

Pvt. 2 Brm, 1 Ba. w/FrpI, 
Wash/Dry, W/W, Dishwasher. 
Walk to Laf. BART/Shopping, easy 
frwy access. $950/mo. incl. 
W&T. Avail. Nov. 15th. Jim, 
945-7131 or 284-5452. E45 


$695-$1200. 1 Br. & 2 Br. Apts. 
Penthouse, Pool, Sauna, Prkg. 
Market/Castro, 621-1644 or 
863-3458._^ 

Castro Furnished Rooms, Remod. 
$125-$135/wk. 626-6806. E02 



Locally Employed Welcome 



Low Daily and 
Weekly Rates 

ALL GAY 

SAUNA - LOUNGE•SUNDECK 
TV in Room or Share Kitchen 

NEAR CIVIC CENTER 



417 GOUGH STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO. CA 94102 
(415)431-9131 


Superior Accommodations in an 
Immaculate European Style Hotel 
Conveniently Located near The 


t20 per night 
and up 


GOLDEN Weekly Rates 

CITY INN 

1.554 Howard St. 
Between 11th & 12th 


NEED A ROOMMATE? 

OUR GAY ROOMMATE SERVICE 
HAS HELPED 1000s OF 
GAY MEN AND LESBIANS 

552-8868 


ROOMMATERS “ 

For compatible, 
trustworthy roommates! 

Oakland/ SF Bay/ 

East Bay San Jose 

533-9949 553-3836 


Lesbian housemate wanted 
$300-i-util. W/D, Fpl., piano, nice 
garden, carpeting. Berkeley near 
Bart. Cat OK. Shr food. No smokg 
heavy alcohol or drugs. 420- 
0895(H) or 626-5444(W) M/W/F 
E47 


$275. Oak-Steiner apt. to share 
for one w/24 y.o. 861-5849. 

• E46 

$400 Share Furn. 8 Rm. Viet. 
Flat. DW, W/D, Mic/wave, 2 firepl. 
Patio—very nice. Near Alamo Sq. 
346-0229._^ 

GWM share 2 Bdrm 1 Bath $300 
-I- 1/2 util. Nr. UC Med. area. Call 
Marc 566-6142. E45 



$300. Own room in big flat. 
Nice group. 863-2079, Don 
E45 


Share Castro/Divisadero 3 Bdrm, 
2 Ba. lrg. flat. View, frpic. $420 
+ V3 util. incl. maid service. Non- 
smoker. 861-2231. E45 


Glenn Canyon home seeking 
compatible co-sharer. One 
bedroom available. 334-1542 or 
333-5189. E45 


Marin. Share hse, own bdrm, W/D 
for Latin or Black, 18-28. $295 
incl. util. John, 454-6203. 

E45 


Share House in Berkeley. 
Spacious room, washer, dryer. 
Close to campus & Bart. $425. 
First, Last, $150. 644-1981. 

E45 


PWARC needs to share apt. start¬ 
ing Dec. 1st. $250 to $300 mo. 
Smoker, in good health. Call Clint, 
457-7099. E45 


Share 2 bedroom apt. $250. mo. 
Alamo Sq. area. Ed, 922-0805 
E45 

Share 3 Bdrm 2 Ba. apt. w/GWMs 
Excellent location, Polk Dist. 
$400/monthly. 771-7846. E45 

Tiburon-Shr. beaut. 2 bd./2 ba. 
Apt. w/GWM, Nonsmoker, $450 
-I- 'A util. Lv. msgr. 381-9767. 

E45 



Share flat, Market-Castro, 
2 bdrms complete furnished for 
gay male above 40, nonsmoker, 
$400, util. incl. Sam 673-7245 
day, 431-0177 eve. E45 


Alameda male wanted to share 2 
bdrm, 1 ba. Apt. with 2 males. 
Nonsmkr only. Quiet street. 
$200. per mo. incl. utl. 521-0100 

E45 

? FURN. RM.FOR RENT IN VIC. t 
^ NO DRUGS AND NO DRINKERS J 

{ $290.00 PLUS DEPOSIT CALL { 
♦ JIM AT 621-2652 10A TO 10P ♦ 


S.J. Nude Models Wanted 
Good Pay, 18-30, Blonds 
Super Body, (408) 249-5224 

E50 


1808 CLUB 

offers good bucks to anyone 
able to clean it and 
meet owner's specifications. 

Start at $6. per hour 
3 hrs. daily, Thursday-Tuesday 
Non-Smoker's apply after 8 PM, 
Thurs., Fri. and Sat. 

See Jim, 1808 Market. 


BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 45 






































































































[IW/A\REA[EEPORTEReLASSIFIEDS 



LOOKING FOR 
THAT DIFFERENT 
KIND OF JOB? 


0 


Professional owner-operator 
household relocation needs a full¬ 
time associate • Class-1 not 
necessary • Traveling in Califor¬ 
nia only • You need to possess 
most of the following qualities: 

ENERGETIC (Not afraid of hard work) 
ENJOY SWEAT • SENSE OF HUMOR 
TAKE DIRECTION WELL 
ENJOY TRAVEL‘EASY GOING 
For the right person this opportu¬ 
nity holds incredible potential for 
growth—Please reply in writing 
with letter of interest and qualifi¬ 
cations to: TJ. VanNattan, 584 
Castro, Suite 264, San Francisco, 
CA 94114-2588. equal opportunity M/F 




Nursing Attendant/ 
LVN's/RN's 

Flexible Home Care Hours 
Live-ins, Shifts, Visits 

An opportunity to care 
for AIDS patients at home. 

Immediate Openings 

Comprehensive Community 
Home Health & Hospice 
Cali 991-3333 


Wanted 2 Barbers. Apply at 
Male Image, 2195 Mkt. 621-6448 
E45 

J/0 Dancers w/gd Iks for all male 
audience. Auditions daily after 
6 PM at 145 Eddy St. E45 

Erotic nude perf. for adult gay 
cinema. Up to $1000 per wk. 
729 Bush M-F after 11am eb 


24 year old gay Australian wants 
to stay 6 months. Needs help/no 
green card. Can anybody help out 
there? Gary, 563-7575. E45 


Hair Salon. All or Part 
Great Deal. 552-7517 


Profitable gay rest, 
and lounge downtown 
Seattle private park¬ 
ing attractive lease 
under market value 
deal with owner 40K 
down bal. on contract. 

Call Shirley: 

(206) 672-3439 



Painter 

Starting Sal. Based on Expr. 
Sheetrock Expr. Helpful, Two 
positions open. 647-7647. 

E46 

COMPUTER OPERATOR 
needed in Open Hand Food 
Project office. Knowledge 
of MS DOS and simple data 
base management required. 
Must be self-motivated & 
willing to find ways for 
PC to ease office chores. 

Our office is a loving 
and busy place to work. 
Start: $6.00/hr. 20+ hrs/wk 
Call Bruce: 641-7860. 

E45 

Fulltime Bartender pos. open at 
S.F. dance bar. Also seeking 
Video DJ w/own library. Call 
431-8775 for info. E45 

Reliable persons for specialized 
moving company. Experienced in 
moving/installing fragile furni¬ 
ture. Must be neat, have positive 
attitude and work well with 
dernanding clientele. Call only 
4-5 P.M. 695-1414._^ 

Seek Macho Couple to Operate 
Farm Central NV. Need own 
transportation plus self-reliance. 
P.O. Box 5134, Reno, NV 89513 

E45 

COMPUTER OPERATOR/ 

DATA ANALYST 

The office of the Clerk United States Court 
of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit is now ac¬ 
cepting applications for the kposition of 
Computer Operator/Data Analyst. Judicial 
Salary Plan Range (JSP) Grade 5-7. Salary 
Range $16,790-$18,418 yearly. Closing 
Date: November 6, 1987. Applications 
may be obtained from Room 202, Office 
of the Clerk, United States Court of Ap¬ 
peals, P.O. Box 547, San Francisco, CA 
94101-0547 (415) 556-8011. E.0.E.E45 

BODY AND FENDER MECHANIC 
(BRIDGE) 

Position open to In-House/Outside Recruit¬ 
ment. Salary Range: $17.80 per hour -t- 
benefits. I Opening. Application deadline: 
Nov. 6, 1987. Position Description: Under 
the direction of the Heavy Duty Mechanic, 
fabricates, welds, and repairs metal on 
bridge vehicles and equipment. Repairs 
fiberglass vehicles as required. Resumes 
are not accepted in lieu of a completed 
Golden Gate Bridge H&TD application. 
Apply at Personnel Department, Golden 
Gate Bridge, Highway and Transportation 
District, 1011 Andersen Drive, San Rafael, 
CA. Mailing address: Box 9000, Presidio 
Station, San Francisco, CA 94129, 
telephone (415) 257-4526. Office hours: 
8:30 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. E.O.E. E45 


HOME AND INCOME! 

VICTORIAN 4 UNITS: Marvelous hi 
ceilings, wonderful terraced backyard, 
hdwd. floors, unique views, 1 car 
garage. Seconds from Castro Village. 
Bargain at $399,500. 

ART DECO FLATS: 2 Huge five room 
(2 Bedrm) flats. Hdwd. floors, frpis., 
decks, some view, 2 car garage. Vi 
block to Castro. Beautiful bldg. 
$399,000. 

C. De Martini 

(415) 441-7272 or 433-3652 

EVANS PACIFIC REALTOR 


DODGE DIPLOMAT 

1982 Auto, 8 cyl., P/S, P/B, AC 
XInt running. Super body! 

4 Door Blue Sedan, Sharp! 
$2,900/6.0. Mornings after 11/3 
Brandon 775-8678 

E45 

Comm. Popcorn Machine 
24x24x30, Good Promo for Bar 
or large affairs. $365. Call 
Toni 626-8390 

E45 



Enemas • Free Intro • 864-8597 
E50 


Wanted: Greenhouse space in ex¬ 
isting building or will build in your 
yard. Could trade gardening ser¬ 
vices or alternative. Dean, 
922-6534. e47 




TOKYO . . . . via LAX $507 MANILA . RT $599 

TOKYO . NSJALRT$587 JAKARTA . RT$869 

HONGKONG JALRT$587 SHANGHAI . RT$649 

SINGAPORE . JAL RT $697 GERMANY .... OW $199 
150 POWELL ST. SUITE 402 A, SF, CA 94102 



BOB DOUGLAS 

TRIAL ATTORNEY 

Criminal •Juvenile 
Family •Civil •Gov't Benefits 
— Moderate Fees — 

552-9640 


AFFORDABLE LEGAL SERVICE 
BANKRUPTCY SPECIALIST 
FROM $195.00 FEE 
INSTALLMENT PAYMENTS ARRANGED 
WILLS. CORPS. PARTNERSHIPS 
LAW OFFICE OF 
SCOTT V SMITH 863-1417 


FINANCIAL 

PROBLEMS? 

FREE INITIAL CONSULTATION 
WITH EXPERIENCED ATTORNEY 
Waiter R. Nelson 864-0449 


+ CASH FLOW 

PLUS TAX SHELTER 

If you are earning over 
$25,000 & need tax shelter 
& positive cash flow from 
California Real Estate, phone 
Alan (415) 986-8120. Approx. 
Investment $8,000-$15,000. 

E46 


Gay Bar & Restaurant 
For Sale: Portland OR: 
The Liveable City! 
Very Large & well 
equipped. Owner 
wants freedom! Call 
Kate 503-288-1681 

cow HOLLOW CUTTERS 
offers hairstyling chair 
rental. Good environment, 
location, parking. Call 
Robb at 563-6140. $100. wk. 

E45 


GAY LEGAL REFERRAL 
SERVICE 

Project of 

BAY AREA LAWYERS 
FOR INDIVIDUAL FREEDOM 
DISCRIMINATION 
REAL ESTATE - BUSINESS 
CRIMINAL LAW 
PERSONAL INJURY 
FAMILY LAW 
621-3900 

$20 Referral Fee for first 1 ' 2 hour 
consultation. Some low fee oi 
referrals available. 


Kelly's Hauling 
Service 

Large Truck/Experienced Men 

861-2216 • 337-9744 


News — Opinion 
Entertainment 
All in 

Bay Area Reporter. 

R & R Hauling, Yards, 
Basements, $25 a load plus 
dump fee. Call 552-2585 
__^ 

Hauling, etc. Big Pickup Truck. 
★ $30 min. Bill 441-1054 ★ 
E45 


^ "When you have^ 
to be sure 
that your move 
is right" 

Specializing in offices 
and households. 
Licensed • Insured 

GEMINI 


(4-75) 554-8870 
(4 75) 929-8609 

ICAL. T142874I 



SUNSHINE MOVERS 


Lowest Legal Rates 
Expert Piano Moving 
24 Hr./7 Day Service 
Licensed & Fully Insured 
Corporate and Office 
Packing with Care 




' 821-9440 

CAL T 140575 


Save $ You do the work, we do 
the driving. Sm./Lgr. Truck 
558-8863._^ 

Herkules Hauling 
Hauling, Relocating, Delivery 
Small Jobs OK. 387-6734 

E47 

Big Haul w/small truck $20. 
—What fits —David —863-5591. 

El 

Large 5 Ton Van For Hire 
Exp. 24-Hr. Beeper - 548-0153 



THE BEST MOVERS IN THE GALAXY! 


Save 15-50% on Moving & Storage! 

Family-owned by Bay Area Natives. 
Free Wardrobes & Free Estimates. 
Quick, courteous, gentle crews. 
Save money & trees: Vlte lend boxes! 
6 fully equipped 18-30’ trucks! 
No hidden fees-Same rate 7 days! 
Professional, caring & affordable. 
Vie take Plastic & Checks too! 


RELOCATING? 

David's Hauling 821-2691 

EB 

★ Flints★Hauling & Relocation 
Services. $15 hr. Call 863-8482 
for 2 X-lg trucks-12 yrs. Expr. 

E48 

★ Trucking Service, Etc.^ 
Hauling/Garage/Basement 
Lot Clearing - 10 yrs. Expr. 
Call J. W. Leo, 431-4672 



OMEBlGMANOt 

ONE BIG TRUCK 


SpedoUiing in Koommorte Bnlocatioa 


10% i*turns to gar choxlttos (415) 931-0193 


2 MEN & VAN CHEAP 

24 hr page. Louis 979-4555 
E45 

Lotus Hauling to the dump 
Sm.-Lge. truck 861-8612 


MOVING SPECIALISTS 



821-4755 

CALT-133915 

3055 23RD STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO • 94110 



EST. 1973 

C»l P.U.C.T. ■ 140305 

STORAGE 

VISA • MASTERCHARGE 

LCDWEST LEGAL RATES 

HOUSEHOLD • OFFICE 

567-6166 


lur network of independent movers 
is safer, faster, & cheaper too! 
Dally runs: NY, Bos, DC., Mia, Atl. 
Days, not weeks to the East Coast. 
Only 500 pound minimum, too. 
Pickup dates at your convenience! 
Need storage? 6 days free! 
Guaranteed rates/No hidden charges! 
Free CHAMM6NE with your move too! 
You can’t beat our service & rates. 
I CAUAHYTUK I 
8394444 ' 


5% OF PROFITS 
DONATED TO PEACt/ , 
ENVIRONMENTAL CAUSES! 


I SERVICE CALL WORK 
I FAST RESPONSE 
I EMERGENCY REPAIRS 
I ON-TIME. OUALITY WORK 

I Cristopher 
Electric 
’ ( 415 ) 282-3003 


BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 46 













































































































































©AYZ^REALXIEPORTERQLASSIFIEDS 



Plumbing Gt Flooring 

Best Rotes 
5 Veors Experience 
Free Estimates 

Lorry 864-6023 


LEHMAN ELECTRIC 

of California 

Electricians (or Home and Business 

( 415 ) 431-5975 

Evening appts. Available 
CSL 494965 


MANHONTERS Painting .Carpentry 

AKin riADrtcKiiKjn amh riPAKicoc w » ■ m 

t«51621-8652 


The Urban Animal 
On Holiday? Fine Pet Care 
In Your Home. 995-2881 


AND GARDENING AND CLEANERS. 
FREE estimates. 


Not 


VIDEO XMAS CARD 

going home for Xmas? 


Restoration Floor 

Remodeling Refinishing 
Painting & Installation 

CHRIS (415) 979-8815 


★ Sheetrock ★ Plastering ★ 
Painting. Call Ben 536-5119 

^ 

MEL OTT'S 
PLUMBING 

282-8713 LIC.408474 


BIG STROKE 

Painting Int/Ext 
Wallpapering 
Quality Work 
Reasonable Rates 
Free Estimates 

653-6875 
Cole & Kevin 


REMODELING 

• Carpentry • Floor Work 

• Tile Work • RefInIshIng 

• Painting & New Floors 

Experienced 

Paul 558-8548 Eric 


PLUMBING 

CARPENTRY 

ELECTRICAL 

Multiple Units a Specialty 

David 282-1511 
EXPERT CARPENTRY 

Have a bunch of small jobs 
or a large one? Cali us in. 

25 years of friendly experience. 
FREE ESTIMATES! 



Home Improvements Center 
Plumbing, Carpentry, Electric 
673-1498, Nick 

^ 

Reasonable & Reliable 
Handywork-Think R&R 566-0646 
_^ 

Quality Interior Painting 
Larry and Randy 621-6231 

^ 

Painting interior/exterior 
free estimates 626-5018 

E47 

CARPENTER 

Call Bruno 626-3131, ext. 300 

E48 

Sheila's Repairs 

PLUMBING 
ELECTRICAL 
CARPENTRY 


THE TELEPHONE MAN 

Installations for Home or Business 
From One Jack • 
to Complete Phone Systems 
^ LOVX/ RATES 

QUALITY WORK 
PLEASE CALL JIM <4ISI 441-3310 


FIRST CALL CATERING 

FOOD FOR ALL OCCASIONS 
Cocktail parties • dinners • brunches 
Bartenders • Servers 
Experienced Professionals 

861-8454 


Send a personal Video home. 
Family/Friends will love seeing 
you on VCR. Star in your own 
greeting while we shoot and 
produce. Do it now before 
Holidays. Less than airfare. 

652-6603 

E45 

Robert Trickey Upholstery 
Fine Quality & Fair Prices. 7 yrs. 
in S.F. Free estimate. 864-6516 

E45 

Improve Your Lifestyle! 
French house cleaner to do your 
housechores. $8./hr. Ref. S.F. 

Richard 621-4596 

E45 


ULTRA-BRITE INC. 
CARPET CLEANING 
AND SALES 

• Carpets Steam Cleaned 

• Upholstery Cleaning 

• Carpet Repairs 

• Carpet Stretching 

• New Carpet Sales 

( 415 ) 626 - 9812 - 583-3733 

Free Est. 24 Hr. Serv. 


HOME CLEANING 

Reliable and Experienced. Call 
Dave 553-3852 for Estimate. 

E49 


Z & H Housecleaning 

552-8328 

w (go ahead. . . 


PIANO 

LESSONS 

931-4673 

KELLV 



SAVE MONEY Z / 

For a short time we will clean 
any rug or carpet for 20% off 
list price. SAVE MONEY by * 1 [ 
having us clean your floor 
coverings before the , * 

Fall rush 

David Dei Rosario 285-9908 



Super Cleaning $7.00 an hour 
Call 776-6526 for appt. E45 

Quality Cleaning Co. 
Professional, Reasonable, Bonded 
We clean apts., home or office. 
Free estimate. Cali 626-4218 
Rick or Henry 

E46 

Italian housecleaner, 7 yrs exper. 
S.F. Ref. Enrico 861-0294 E47 

Professionals 
Home & Office Cleaning 
Roger 431-8243 Ref. Exp. 


Quality Housecleaning 
Fast. Refs. Don 863-9053 

E4 

* Carpets Steam Cleaned * 
Hugh 441-2730 


CLASSIFIED ORDER FORM 


Deadline for each Thursday's paper is NOON MONDAY. 
Payment MUST accompany ad. 

No ads taken over the phone. 

If you have a question, call (415) 861-5019. 


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BAY AREA REPORTER NOVEMBER 5, 1987 PAGE 47